TEDx: Jordan Edelheit: Breaking Stereotypes

August 14, 2016 0 comments Open printer friendly version of this article Print Article

The U.S. has only five percent of the global population but has twenty-five percent of the incarcerated population. Jordan Edelheit believes we can transform our society and better understand the mass incarceration problem that exists here by putting a face to these statistics. MetroJacksonville is very proud to be a media sponsor of TEDxJacksonville. This great video of Jordan Edelheit is from TEDxJacksonville 2015! Join us after the jump for "Breaking Stereotypes, Building Empathy."



The U.S. has only five percent of the global population but has twenty-five percent of the incarcerated population. Jordan believes we can transform our society and better understand the mass incarceration problem that exists here by putting a face to these statistics. Some of the most positive disruptors are those working at Marion Correctional Institution (MCI), a 2,700-men prison in Marion, Ohio. Officials there use Skype to facilitate conversations between audiences and incarcerated men; the resulting conversations on incarceration, justice, and humanity have the unique power to build empathy, understanding, and awareness of our shared humanity.

While an undergrad at Ohio State, Jordan Edelheit fell in love with TED’s mission of “ideas worth spreading” and began organizing TEDx events. In addition to TEDxOhioStateUniversity, Jordan was on the founding team of the first TEDx to take place in an adult prison, TEDxMarionCorrectional. She has since spent the past three years striving to learn and share stories within the justice system, and now works with The Mayerson Foundation in Cincinnati, Ohio leading their young professional and social change programs. She is inspired by countless incarcerated men who lead by example that spoken word poetry can be a tool of expression, possibly even the answer to sharing our most random beautiful thoughts. Jordan believes in building empathy by listening to one story at a time. She finds herself smiling most after experiencing shared humanity in unexpected spaces . . . like prison.

This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community. Learn more at http://ted.com/tedx