Five of the Most Amazing Things About Jacksonville

April 3, 2013 15 comments Open printer friendly version of this article Print Article

Without Jacksonville the world would be a poorer and less interesting place. It is no exaggeration to say that some of the most important cultural and social trends of the past hundred years are rooted either in Jax or people from Jax. Without Native Jaxson Don Estridge, for example, would we all be connected online right now? What would people yell at concerts around the world, "Blackbird!"? Join us after the jump as Stephen Dare compiles five amazing facts that no one seems to know about Jacksonville!





1.  It is the City that First Named "The Blues" Officially.

http://etd.lib.fsu.edu/theses_1/available/etd-03312006-171940/unrestricted/pds_dissertation.pdf

Lynn Abbot and Doug Seroff have identified the first published account of blues singing on a public stage. The word was used to describe a performance in LaVilla on April 16, 1910.

In an Indianapolis Freeman “Stage” section article entitled “Jacksonville Theatrical Notes,” the reviewer states that Prof. John W. F. Woods, a ventriloquist, and his doll Henry, “set the Airdome wild by making little Henry drunk.

He uses the ‘blues’ for little Henry in this drunken act.”

We can be fairly certain that visiting vocalists had adopted this style elsewhere and carried it into these theaters.

LaVilla regular, Gertrude “Ma” Rainey was the conduit through which the blues first moved onto many vaudeville stages. When John W. Work interviewed Ma Rainey at the Douglas Hotel in Nashville during the early thirties, she described memories of her first experience of this music. While touring with a tent show through a small Missouri town around 1902, she heard a girl who “came to the tent one morning and began to sing about the ‘man who had left her.’”

Rainey learned this “strange and poignant” song and used it in her act as an encore. The overwhelming response to this song convinced her to give this music a “special place” in her act.

Work documented that, “many times she was asked what kind of a song it was, and one day a few years later she replied, in a moment of inspiration, ‘It’s the Blues.’”

Check out Metrojacksonville forum research on the "Black Bottom Blues" that Ma Rainey is singing about in the video above!
Black Bottom Blues Originated in Jacksonville





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