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Northside's Parkway Shops Nearing Completion

While much of Jacksonville's retail focus addresses what's new at St. Johns Town Center or what's lacking in downtown, the area around the Northside's River City Marketplace continues to see growth as well. Here is a visual update on the status of the latest shopping center north of the Trout River: Parkway Shops

Published February 18, 2013 in Development      44 Comments    Open printer friendly version of this article Print Article


feature

Riding the wave of success from the development of River City Marketplace, Ramco-Gershenson Properties Trust is moving forward with their latest retail project at the I-95/Airport Road interchange in North Jacksonville.  Across the street from River City Marketplace, phase 1 of Ramco-Gershenson's Parkway Shops features 89,138 square feet of retail space for national retail and restaurant tenants.

Due to be completed this Spring, the majority of retail space within the center has already been leased. Dick's Sporting Goods will serve as the largest anchor.  This 45,000 square foot space will be the chain's third location in Northeast Florida.  Their first two area stores are located at St. Johns Town Center and Orange Park Mall. Furthermore, Marshall's is nearing completion of their latest Jacksonville location in an adjacent space. The 25,000 square foot store will be the chain's seventh in the region and second on the northside of the city. Ulta Beauty, plans to open in the first phase of Parkway Shops as well.  Ulta already has Jacksonville stores at Markets at Town Center and Oakleaf Town Center.  Also on its way, Jacksonville's second BJ's Restaurant & Brewhouse is currently under construction on a 2.94 acre outparcel.  

After this phase is complete, additional land is set aside for four outparcels and a phase two, featuring as much as 260,000 square feet of additional retail space.

Page 2 - Parkway Shops Construction Images



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44 Comments

peestandingup

February 18, 2013, 04:30:07 AM
Gross.

I-10east

February 18, 2013, 07:05:34 AM
Let more of the typical anti-suburban rhetoric begin...

thelakelander

February 18, 2013, 07:48:39 AM
A possible kick in the pants for the Regency area.  Nevertheless, this area should get another major economic boost with Shands moving forward on their project across the street.

tufsu1

February 18, 2013, 08:43:24 AM
Gross.

just curious...is your problem the location or the design of the center....in essence, if it were more walkable, would that be not gross?

peestandingup

February 18, 2013, 09:04:52 AM
Gross.

just curious...is your problem the location or the design of the center....in essence, if it were more walkable, would that be not gross?

Its gross because every single one of these places, scattered all across the country, look EXACTLY the same, have the same corporate giants occupying them (many stocked with Chinese made goods using slave labor), are completely car-centric with seas of parking lots surrounding them, stuck out on the boonies while the city cores (what actually defines a real city) looks like shit with no one living in them, etc.

Has nothing to do with being a hipster, or snob, or urban whore/suburban hater or anything else I'm sure people will try to label this as. Its gross because that's what we've become here in America & is a big problem with what's wrong with us as a society & a country. Hope that answers everyone's questions. Feel free to disagree, I just personally think its tragic.

thelakelander

February 18, 2013, 09:11:29 AM
I've always felt....and still do...that you can't blame site design on a private company.  Government controls this.  Dick's, CVS, Marshall's, etc. could ultimately care less about suburban vs. urban design, inner city vs. far flung store location, etc. as long as there is a viable market for them to do business in and their costs are the same.  Here, it's simply more difficult to put together a multimodal friendly site plan than the autocentric stuff the city's land use and zoning regulations promote. If you want change, it all starts at the local level, imo.

fsquid

February 18, 2013, 09:21:16 AM
I've always felt....and still do...that you can't blame site design on a private company.  Government controls this.  Dick's, CVS, Marshall's, etc. could ultimately care less about suburban vs. urban design, inner city vs. far flung store location, etc. as long as there is a viable market for them to do business in and their costs are the same.  Here, it's simply more difficult to put together a multimodal friendly site plan than the autocentric stuff the city's land use and zoning regulations promote. If you want change, it all starts at the local level, imo.

agree

peestandingup

February 18, 2013, 09:38:05 AM
I've always felt....and still do...that you can't blame site design on a private company.  Government controls this.  Dick's, CVS, Marshall's, etc. could ultimately care less about suburban vs. urban design, inner city vs. far flung store location, etc. as long as there is a viable market for them to do business in and their costs are the same.  Here, it's simply more difficult to put together a multimodal friendly site plan than the autocentric stuff the city's land use and zoning regulations promote. If you want change, it all starts at the local level, imo.

Sure. I don't blame the stores themselves or the companies who build these types of destinations. They're just doing what they do. Governments could ultimately stop it, many of them have (with urban growth boundaries & things of that sort). But thats usually not the norm. Its a complicated issue I believe. A lot of it has to do with cities relying on this type of outward growth instead of smart, localized growth, transportation alternatives & true life quality enhancements. Jax is certainly in that camp. We talk about that a lot on here of course, but we're not a unique city in that respect. It's what everybody's done pretty much. Add some mega banks making loans on crap cookie cutter housing, spending more money on gas and everything that goes along with that whole mess, and you've got yourself a giant turd sandwich of an economy & cities across the country that are a shell of their former selves.

Developers of course do benefit & I'm sure there's a lot of back room deals going on, but its ultimately up to the people & the governments who represent them to reject it. But fat chance of that usually happening. People it seems in general don't care enough to pay attention & will just go with the "norm" or with what corporate America tells them to do, and governments are more likely to take the easy way of just letting anything be developed anywhere, no matter if it makes sense or has people's best interests in mind or not.

The funny part is, all of this stuff will eventually die off anyway from the retail collapse thats currently happening before our eyes, so who knows. Maybe they'll turn it back into cow pastures or nature will just reclaim it when its abandoned.

thelakelander

February 18, 2013, 09:49:49 AM
Quote
A lot of it has to do with cities relying on this type of outward growth instead of smart, localized growth, transportation alternatives & true life quality enhancements. Jax is certainly in that camp.

Anytime a municipality relies on "growth" as an economic engine, its a major problem for long term fiscal sustainability.  All growth isn't good and in Jacksonville's case, we've developed a model that is ponzi scheme based.  It's ponzi scheme based because the subsidies we provide (roads, utilities, libraries, schools, police/fire, pensions, etc.) are typically more than the amount of overall revenue that low density development generates.  Thus, even after decades of growth, as soon as the growth stops, you're in the red and in need of budget cutbacks.  With that said, suburban development isn't bad and not all urban development is good.  There is a balance.  For our future, we should be making sure that all of our growth should be fiscally sustainable on the public level instead of enacting policy to boost the individual developer's profit margins.

Doctor_K

February 18, 2013, 09:53:54 AM
Not to mention the TONS of derelict, dilapidated, and abandoned strip malls so much closer to "town". 

How about "smarter growth" for the sake of rehabbing all of this vacant, existing property than growth and expansion for the sake of growth and expansion?

At what point does it end?

thelakelander

February 18, 2013, 10:03:45 AM
It can end several ways.  For example, it can end with the city ultimately filing bankruptcy.  This is occurring in some cities across the country such as Stockton, CA.  It can also end with the general public electing representatives that work to move us away from decades old policies that ultimately lead to bankruptcy.  We've seen this type of thing happening with Charlotte and now it appears that even Orlando is starting to follow a similar path.  Locally, I think we're at a point where we could go either way.

peestandingup

February 18, 2013, 11:14:48 AM
It can end several ways.  For example, it can end with the city ultimately filing bankruptcy.  This is occurring in some cities across the country such as Stockton, CA.  It can also end with the general public electing representatives that work to move us away from decades old policies that ultimately lead to bankruptcy.  We've seen this type of thing happening with Charlotte and now it appears that even Orlando is starting to follow a similar path.  Locally, I think we're at a point where we could go either way.

I think a lot of cities are going to be unable to handle what this type of growth model has done because they're either not recognizing it, or are just telling themselves it'll somehow magically get better & they can just get back to growing themselves out of anything. I mentioned collapse of retail because I believe it's going to be a giant shit storm for a lot of cities to handle & all the housing arrangements that have grown up around that type of big box industry. Kinda like Detroit did around the auto industry. Its an extreme example sure, but one that should be learned from. Now they don't know what to do with all the housing glut in the outer rims & are mowing it down to turn it back into green spaces, gardens, etc because they simply can't take care of it.

I honestly don't know what to think about Jacksonville. Some days I think its going to be OK & they'll come to their senses, some days I think its doomed when they talk about outer beltways, mobility fee moratoriums, & all that nice development that goes along with those things as a way to "grow ourselves" out of trouble. Thats obviously never going to work. So anyone who supports it, you know who you need to get rid of. Because they either have someone's hands down their pants, or are just too stupid to hold any kind of elected office or appointed chair that makes decisions over city matters.

jcjohnpaint

February 18, 2013, 11:57:07 AM
Supply side economics-  Exactly what some on our council want to promote with the moratorium.  We need to rid our selves of these selfish politicians.  That will be a start. 

stephendare

February 18, 2013, 12:05:22 PM
Supply side economics-  Exactly what some on our council want to promote with the moratorium.  We need to rid our selves of these selfish politicians.  That will be a start.

And replace them with politicians who know that there is just as much profit from infill and densification for developers. 

FSBA

February 18, 2013, 12:29:14 PM
A possible kick in the pants for the Regency area.  Nevertheless, this area should get another major economic boost with Shands moving forward on their project across the street.

People talk about The Avenues and the Towncenter being the death of Regency, but the opening and growth of RCMP is what did Regency in. Regency was still the primary retail area for most Northsiders prior to RCMP.

Tacachale

February 18, 2013, 01:31:15 PM
I have a couple of thoughts on this stuff. For one, yes, the local government sets the zoning, but developers and private citizens influence the government. It's not as if the city can just change all its zoning codes without backlash, and it's also not as if private citizens and companies aren't behind the current set up; changing everything in a fell swoop just isn't going to happen. Second, if developers can't get what they want in one municipality or county, they often go even further out to find a place that will let them do what they want. Thus in some cases restrictions can actually encourage further sprawl, which is what's happened in the St. Augustine area and much of St. Johns County, really. Third, Jacksonville isn't anywhere close to bankruptcy; we're in the financial state we're in largely because taxes are so low and our elected officials don't have the guts to raise them. We don't have a looming asteroid threatening to flatten us and force change; if we want change we have to do it because we want it.

In short, any change we seek needs to be practical or it will fail to happen, if not backfire entirely. It begins and ends with us.

thelakelander

February 18, 2013, 04:11:23 PM
Yes, I agree that all of this begins and ends with us.  Case in point, we elected Redman into office and let him run unopposed a few years back.  Can we really complain when he decides it's best to level Hemming Plaza or enact policy that is counterproductive to the revitalization of the downtown district he represents?  However, in terms of modifying the zoning code to allow for higher densities or reduced setbacks in certain areas, I seriously doubt you'll find much protest from the development community.  That type of stuff only leads to increased profits and higher returns for the average taxpayer.  That's a different animal from trying to enforce an urban development boundary on an already sprawled out county.  That ship sailed away from Duval County decades ago.

Also, I wouldn't be so quick to declare everything is peaches and cream financially.  We may be standing tall now but we're a quick Mike Tyson left hook to the chin from seeing the ring side ways. We may not be nearing bankruptcy today but we'll eventually approach that direction if everything continues "as is" on the same path.  The way I see it, we're setting ourselves up to encounter some real financial challenges when the chickens finally come home to roost in the form of maintaining and replacing our infrastructure and investments (schools, utility lines, pensions, road maintenance, etc.).  In the past, we've had the federal and state government to bear significant portions of various burdens.  With everyone so cash strapped now, that support will continue to decrease.

I-10east

February 18, 2013, 06:31:46 PM
Not to mention the TONS of derelict, dilapidated, and abandoned strip malls so much closer to "town". 

To me it's all about location, so I don't buy that right at this moment in 2013 putting a Dick Sporting Goods in some old place that have seen better days (DT, Gateway, Regency etc) and expecting it to have the same success as the Parkway Shops location. I understand that everyone wants to be resourceful, but bottomline location is very important; Growing & safe vs the downtrodden areas, not much of a decision.

thelakelander

February 18, 2013, 07:14:26 PM
Well they did open a Dick's in Orange Park Mall a few years back. That section of Blanding, while congested, has seen better days. However, unlike Regency, continuously updates Orange Park Mall's offerings.

cityimrov

February 18, 2013, 10:43:16 PM
That very first picture, is that what Mellow Mushroom is going to look like in Avondale? 

I-10east

February 18, 2013, 11:00:41 PM
Well they did open a Dick's in Orange Park Mall a few years back. That section of Blanding, while congested, has seen better days. However, unlike Regency, continuously updates Orange Park Mall's offerings.

The Orange Park Mall itself is doing pretty well; It's like night and day in direct comparison to Regency which has all of those empty spots where restaurants & stores should be inside. Did Chicken Now which was in Reg's food court even last 1/2 a year before they closed already? Hell, even the Landing has a better open-to-close food court ratio than Reg right now.

I-10east

February 18, 2013, 11:19:34 PM
People talk about The Avenues and the Towncenter being the death of Regency, but the opening and growth of RCMP is what did Regency in. Regency was still the primary retail area for most Northsiders prior to RCMP.

Good point. Many Northsiders religiously ventured out to Reg back in the day when the Northside had hardly anything but Gateway. I guess that's the gamble when the community (Arlington) has lack of support for it's nearby mall, which seemingly relied on another part of town which deserved a RCMP sized mall many years ago. So I see no 'blame game' for RCMP being built, that would be like blaming the internet for the decline of the newspaper, as people naturally move on to what's more better and convient.

thelakelander

February 19, 2013, 06:55:36 AM
My point with OPM is that it partially fares better because there has been continued investment in it. If i recall, OPM received some sort of makeover around the time of the Oakleaf Town Center coming online as well. Not the same can be said of Regency. Thus, OPM has been able to better handle it's market share, despite Oak leaf Town Center opening nearby, while Regency has seen more of a struggle with RCM. By the same token, Avenues was revamped around the time SJTC opened. The only odd ball that didn't invest in itself over the last decade was Regency.

fsujax

February 19, 2013, 08:16:12 AM
Now if only Costoco would build a store at the RCMP I would never have to go to SJTC again!

I-10east

February 19, 2013, 08:53:14 AM
Sorry for going off course a lil' but it's funny how some can call a single big box like Bass Pro Shops a 'destination trip' but the freaking SJTC with all kinds of upscale shopping, department stores, eateries. etc oh no, that's definitely not a worthy of a destination trip SMH.

fsujax

February 19, 2013, 09:09:29 AM
My only issue with the SJTC is the traffic flow and parking, especially in and around Costco. The design is terrible.

fsquid

February 19, 2013, 09:56:30 AM
My only issue with the SJTC is the traffic flow and parking, especially in and around Costco. The design is terrible.

yep, I try to avoid it if I can.  Luckily, the traffic around Total Wine isn't terrible.

peestandingup

February 19, 2013, 10:36:19 AM
Sorry for going off course a lil' but it's funny how some can call a single big box like Bass Pro Shops a 'destination trip' but the freaking SJTC with all kinds of upscale shopping, department stores, eateries. etc oh no, that's definitely not a worthy of a destination trip SMH.

Did someone actually say that, or is it the voices in your head again?

I-10east

February 19, 2013, 10:50:40 AM
^^^I've heard people say both statements on different accounts. I haven't been to BPS yet, and I'm not denying that it might be a 'destination trip' and I'm looking forward to the new one in SJC, but to say that SJTC is not a destination (like some said on that STJC thread N4J report a lil while back) like it's some broad statement concerning most is ridiculous, 'bad parking' or not.

FSBA

February 19, 2013, 11:01:02 AM
I've been to the original Bass Pro Shops in Missouri and it is a sight to behold. It is equal parts tourist trap and retail store. However I doubt the other ones around the country come anywhere close.

I-10east

February 19, 2013, 11:17:34 AM
^^^Thanks for the info. Kinda sound similar like Macy's being that the only one that truly matters is in Manhattan.

thelakelander

February 22, 2013, 02:14:23 PM
Another tenant is headed to Parkway Shops. The latest restaurant will be Newk's Express Cafe:

http://jacksonville.com/opinion/blog/423471/gary-mills/2013-02-22/newks-express-cafe-plans-second-jacksonville-location

FSBA

February 23, 2013, 09:04:34 AM
Sounds interesting. Between that and BJs it will add some much needed variety to the restaurant scene at RCMP. Now all it needs is a hookah lounge and a craft brew place like Daliah's and I won't need to go to Riverside/Avondale.

thelakelander

April 05, 2013, 10:35:07 AM

With River City Marketplace success, new shopping center on its way near JIA

Quote
The area around Jacksonville International Airport is getting busier. Driven by River City Marketplace, a new shopping center is opening there. Dick’s Sporting Goods has its grand opening Friday in Parkway Shops. Marshalls, the center’s other anchor, will open next Thursday. It will replace the Marshalls that opened in 2011 in the Highland Square shopping center on Dunn Avenue. That store closes Sunday.

Read more at Jacksonville.com: http://jacksonville.com/business/real-estate/2013-04-05/story/river-city-marketplace-success-new-shopping-center-its-way#ixzz2PbEkJRIo

tufsu1

April 05, 2013, 01:57:39 PM
^ so glad Marshall's is closing a store they opened 2 years ago!

FSBA

April 05, 2013, 02:06:47 PM
I'm surprised JCPenney hasn't moved from Dunn Ave to RCMP. The complex they're in is getting abit seedy and vacant.

thekillingwax

April 05, 2013, 06:24:27 PM
I'm sure they'd like to, but I'm not sure how JCP is sitting financially. From what I heard, their whole "no more sales" thing was a big financial disaster. They'd be a good fit out there but maybe the rent/lease isn't in their range. It's gotta be dirt cheap where they are now, that shopping center is dying a slow death- only thing we ever go out there for is Marco Polo.

I'm happy for the northside getting all this stuff, certainly makes it more attractive to potential residents. One thing I'm honestly a little shocked that hasn't been announced is a Target. I guess there may not be room for it now but I know a lot of people that live out that way and they all say that's the biggest missing store. There's one in Fernandina. I haven't been to the one in Regency in a long time- last time I was there, it was pretty nasty on the inside (by Target standards) and overall looked run-down.

thelakelander

April 05, 2013, 06:30:38 PM
Hmm, so JCPenney can't outrun the fate of the shopping center they originally abandoned.....Gateway?  There's more land in the RCMP area if they're willing to pay.

carpnter

April 06, 2013, 09:22:57 AM
I'm sure they'd like to, but I'm not sure how JCP is sitting financially. From what I heard, their whole "no more sales" thing was a big financial disaster. They'd be a good fit out there but maybe the rent/lease isn't in their range. It's gotta be dirt cheap where they are now, that shopping center is dying a slow death- only thing we ever go out there for is Marco Polo.

I'm happy for the northside getting all this stuff, certainly makes it more attractive to potential residents. One thing I'm honestly a little shocked that hasn't been announced is a Target. I guess there may not be room for it now but I know a lot of people that live out that way and they all say that's the biggest missing store. There's one in Fernandina. I haven't been to the one in Regency in a long time- last time I was there, it was pretty nasty on the inside (by Target standards) and overall looked run-down.

They did have a Target planned for the northside but most of their new store plans were shelved when the economy took a dump.  They have been remodeling nearly all of their existing stores that aren't SuperTargets and converting them to the current layout.  Red walls, larger market area, etc... All of the regular stores in Jax, including Regency, have been remodeled now. 

simms3

April 06, 2013, 01:41:22 PM
I've always felt....and still do...that you can't blame site design on a private company.  Government controls this.  Dick's, CVS, Marshall's, etc. could ultimately care less about suburban vs. urban design, inner city vs. far flung store location, etc. as long as there is a viable market for them to do business in and their costs are the same.  Here, it's simply more difficult to put together a multimodal friendly site plan than the autocentric stuff the city's land use and zoning regulations promote. If you want change, it all starts at the local level, imo.


Nobody will consider that site urban, though.  I agree with you overall, but these nationals have store formats that work depending on the site...We have both urban and suburban Ross's in our portfolio, among other stores (we are getting ready  to do the first ever urban Michaels in one of the busiest pedestrian intersections in the country and it's a real challenge educating them on how it works differently than they are accustomed in strip centers such as above).  The Northside as a submarket is bottom barrel super high risk limited return prospect type market...no retailer or developer in their right mind would try something new there. :(

FYI costs to do urban retail are magnitudes higher than suburban.  Our NNNs for urban format stores across our portfolio are easily 2-10x higher than the same store in a suburban strip or mall format.  While maybe not the case in Jax, typically taxes on a mixed-use urban building are exponentially higher than taxes on a suburban strip (and I'm sure the city of Jax would assess a nicer urban format development higher than this strip unless they are one of the few cities that actually looks at income in their assessment rather than cost).

Marshalls may have a sales threshold target for a place like the Northside of $150psf on an occupancy cost of 10% (occcupancy cost being rent + NNNs + percentage rent, basically what they pay to LL).  Increase development costs and you then increase the rent you must charge, 99% likely the NNNs too and their sales threshold then increases, which creates the likelihood that they no longer consider a depressed market like the Northside.

I-10east

April 06, 2013, 01:47:44 PM
The Northside as a submarket is bottom barrel super high risk limited return prospect type market...no retailer or developer in their right mind would try something new there. :(

Gander Mtn?

I-10east

April 06, 2013, 01:57:13 PM
I've seen FAR worse than the Dunn Ave Shopping Center. It's actually pretty solid occupancy-wise with many stores still out there. Beall's, Citi Trends, It's Fashion Metro, JCP, Winn Dixie, Hibbett Sports and not to mention and of those smaller stores. It's not exactly the SJTC, but far from Gateway. I guess if alot of stores in a mall isn't all high and mighty upscale, the entire complex is deemed 'seedy'. I don't hear about a helluva lot of crime happening out there.

simms3

April 06, 2013, 02:23:12 PM
The Northside as a submarket is bottom barrel super high risk limited return prospect type market...no retailer or developer in their right mind would try something new there. :(

Gander Mtn?

Ramco-Gershenson, who I worked with in my previous job, got in early,  plopped down a cookie cutter standard regional shopping center with floater/outparcel opportunities on cheap land.  They saw an opportunity to develop this retail at a low enough basis to charge low enough rents to attract these retailers to the area, which happens in any area's underperforming submarkets.  Note that where Gander Mtn is also pulls from higher income Nassau/Camden, even Westside Jax (easier to get to than SS or St. Aug).  The stores up there are targeting a very low sales $/person in contrast to what they would target in say the SS or SJC.  It's a underperforming market and everyone knows that, just have to build accordingly.

At first I actually thought these Parkway Shops were further "in" the Northside when I read Dunn Ave...now it's totally obvious that this is as suburban a location as it gets (was reading people's comments clamoring for more "urban" design).

fieldafm

April 06, 2013, 05:19:16 PM
Quote
bottom barrel super high risk limited return prospect type market


Umm, no. 


RCMP has a better $/sq ft than everything but about 7 similar strip mall/regional malls in Jax.  And that covers a lot if very profitable development around town.   

Plus, the City issued over 300 million in bonds to build the infrastructure to support the regional shopping center.  It isn't super high risk. 

I'm not saying RCMP is something the City should subsidize (which they do and lose money on), but your characterization of 'bottom barrel' is not accurate.
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