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Remembering Railroad Row

Ever wonder why Jacksonville lacks a famed district like New York's SOHO, Atlanta's Castleberry Hill, New Orleans' Warehouse District, or Dallas' West End? Twentieth century demolition removed the building fabric needed to spur such a district. Today, Metro Jacksonville remembers Jacksonville's Railroad Row.

Published March 21, 2012 in History      38 Comments    Open printer friendly version of this article Print Article


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The layers of downtown Jacksonville's economy were no more evident than in the layout of Railroad Row.  Dominating Bay & Forsyth Streets between the train station and Broad Street, this was an environment where the economic engines of the maritime and railroad industries met.  This beehive of activity created an atmosphere for a mix of uses creating one of Jacksonville's most interesting urban scenes, including the notorious Ward Street red light district.



Looking west down Bay Street at the intersection with Bridge Street.  Dominated by two to three story masonry buildings, the Railroad Row strip stretches for blocks in the background.  Many of these businesses were industrial and wholesale companies served by the railroad behind them.  Their West Bay Street frontage was dominated by wholesale retail operations and markets selling their products to the general public.  The practice of developing suburban zoning regulations which separated complementing uses at the pedestrian level would eventually eliminate this type of scene in Jacksonville by the late 20th century.



West Bay Street, just outside of the Jacksonville Terminal in 1921, was a vibrant place of activity.  Although the terminal was a mile outside of downtown, it was directly connected to the rest of the city by a streetcar line. 13,828,904 passengers rode Jacksonville's 42 mile street network in 1912.  By 1930, Jacksonville was known as the "Gateway City of the South" and featured 59 miles of streetcar track.  With the Terminal bringing in as many as 20,000 passengers a day, Railroad Row grew up between downtown and the terminal.  Railroad Row was unique in that uses we believe aren't complementing today, such as manufacturing, hotels, restaurants, and bars, all mixed together in a seamless compact pedestrian scale setting.





This Sanborn map of the block between Lee and Davis Streets indicates a mix of uses (hotels, shops, restaurants, wholesale companies, industrial uses, etc.) within a compact setting.



This aerial of the Jacksonville Terminal clearly illustrates the building density of Railroad Row around the intersection of West Bay and Lee Streets.  The mixed use nature of the buildings is evident with the presence of railroad sidings running parallel on both sides of West Bay Street.  Hotels operating on Railroad Row included the Desoto, Olympia, St. Charles, and Colonial Hotels.



This scene captures utility lines being laid down Bay Street, near Jefferson Street, looking west, in the heart of Railroad Row.  Like a scene resembling today's Pittsburgh Strip District, West Bay Street was dominated by the Atlantic & East Coast Terminal Company's railroad freight depot bounded by Bay, Jefferson, Forsyth, and Lee Streets.  By 1925, the leading industries in Jacksonville were ship building, lumber and cigar manufacturing.  The port, which was the deepest on the South Atlantic Coast at the time, specialized in lumber, cotton, phosphate, cigars, sugars, fruits and vegetables.  Companies operating along the West Bay Street strip included Crane Company Plumbing Supplies, Cudahy Packaging Company, Swift & Company, Dixie Warehouse Company, and the Atlantic Distribution Company Beverage Depot.



This Sanborn Map illustrates the location of the Atlantic & East Coast Terminal Company's depot and the building density surrounding it in the vicinity of Jefferson Street.



This image captures of the offices of the Atlantic & East Coast Terminal Company's freight depot at the intersection of Jefferson and Forsyth Streets.  Completed in 1910, it was demolished down in 1979 after its operations were relocated outside of downtown.  If left to remain, it would have been the perfect facility for a use like a public market within walking vicinity of the heart of the Northbank.  A similar structure in downtown Savannah was preserved, eventually being put back to use as classrooms for the Savannah College of Art & Design (SCAD).



Now the site of the new Duval County Courthouse, the intersection of Adams and Clay Streets gave off a completely different vibe during the 1946 Armistice Day parade.



By the mid 20th century, the east end of the district had transitioned into a furniture district between Bay and Adams Street.  This image captures E.C. Newsom Furniture Company in 1948 at the intersection of Adams and Broad Streets.  This building and several around it were demolished in the mid-2000s in anticipation of new development that many thought the new courthouse would bring with it.





11 Broad Street was representative of many of the small masonry buildings that, when combined, created a unique urban environment.  The site of this building is now a pocket park at the intersection of Bay and Broad Streets.



This late 1970s aerial captures the district looking east from I-95 over Forsyth and Bay Streets.  By this time, the district was in decline as it's economic engines were relocated outside of downtown to other areas of Jacksonville.  When this image was taken, the maritime industry had already relocated to Talleyrand and Blount Island.  The passenger railroad station had been relocated to Northwest Jacksonville and the freight railroad terminal to West Jacksonville.  

With no railroad station bringing in 20,000 passengers a day to downtown Jacksonville, the majority of downtown's hotels would close by the end of the decade.  With no railroad passengers, no tourists, and a loss of thousands of manufacturing and maritime jobs from the core, all of downtown's major retailers would shut down by the mid 1980s.  

History suggests that the relocation of the railroad and maritime industry ultimately killed retail in downtown Jacksonville by the end of the 1980s.  Not white flight or suburban shopping malls, which were well into their third continuous decade of activity by then.


RAILROAD ROW TODAY

Needless to say, with the power of the wrecking ball in the name of "urban revitalization" and "downtown redevelopment", Railroad Row is all but gone.  However, a few buildings still stubbornly cling to life.


The site of Hotel Desoto, which enjoyed a prime location across the street from the Jacksonville Terminal, has been reduced to an overgrown surface parking lot.  The Skyway provides transit connectivity, but the buildings that would have made transit viable are no more.



Above: The site where the Crane Company once stood at the corner of Bay and Lee Streets.

Below: The Crane Company building during the 1930s.  Designed by Marsh & Saxelbye, this structure was known for its decorative brickwork.





The Duval Motor Company, one of Jacksonville's earliest Ford dealerships, was located one block north of the Crane Company on the corner of Forsyth and Lee Streets.





927 West Forsyth is one of the few buildings remaining in the vicinity of the Jacksonville Terminal.  Constructed in 1909, for many years it was the home of the Southeast Wheel & Rim Company, shown below.





The remaining two buildings on the block shared by 927 West Forsyth have housed a variety of uses over years including City Meat & Slaughter House company in 1925.  927 West Forsyth, like all of the West Forsyth Street buildings between Lee and Jefferson Streets, once faced the massive Atlantic & East Coast Terminal Company's freight depot.



Interline Brands occupies by land that was once consumed by the Atlantic & East Coast Terminal Company freight depot and offices.



This image of Florida East Coast Railway staff was taken inside the Atlantic & East Coast Terminal Company's warehouse.  Standing on the left is John W. Martin.  Martin would become 24th Governor of Florida, in office from 1925 to 1929.



Across the street, near the intersection of West Forsyth and Madison Streets, this building dates back to 1902.  In 1915, the Jax Chero-Cola Bottling Company operated out of the structure.  Chero-Cola was founded in 1905 as the Union Bottling Works by Claud A. Hatcher in Columbus, GA.  Hatcher's first beverages were named Royal Crown, a ginger ale and a cola called Chero-Cola.  In 1912, the company's name was changed to Chero-Cola.  Over the years, the company's name has changed and it is now known as Royal Crown Cola International.







Sally Industries, at 745 West Forsyth Street, makes robotic characters and figures for use in theme parks, museums, motion picture, and retail stores worldwide.  Sally also provides electronic control and audio systems, staging, lighting, and sound track production.  In addition, the firm creates and installs entire attractions and interactive rides, such as Universal Park's E.T.'s Adventure.  The building housing Sally Industries was completed in 1950 for the Horne-Wilson, Inc.





Located next to Sally, at the intersection of Jefferson and Houston Streets, this building was the home of the Fairmont Creamery Company.


Cora Crane's The Court bordello at the intersection of Davis and Houston Streets.

A century ago, the intersection of Ward Street (now Houston Street) and Davis Street was the epicenter of Jacksonville's famed red light district.  



This Sanborn map illustrates the location of female boarding houses (labeled "F") also known as bordellos, in the vicinity of Davis Street and Ward Streets.



By the late 20th century, most of the bordellos had been replaced by additional warehouse space served by a railroad spur which ran in the center of the street.  While the railroad is long gone, loading docks that once were served by box cars remain in the facades of buildings still standing.






The Hotel Flagler was located one block north of The Court, at the intersection of Davis and Adams Streets.  Today, this site is a vacant lot.



The Covington Building at Forsyth and Jefferson Streets served as a military jail during the Spanish-American War.  Although it survived the Great Fire of 1901, it fell to the wrecking ball associated with the River City Renaissance plan of the 1990s.  Today, the block of surface parking bounded by Forsyth, Broad, Houston, and Jefferson Streets is arguably one of the worst looking areas in downtown Jacksonville.  Look closely and you'll discover its not a parking lot you're parking on.  It's actually the foundations of several demolished buildings that once gave the district its unique flair.  For many years, the majority of the block was occupied by the Pierce-Wall Furniture Company.









This Sanborn map illustrates the footprints of buildings that once stood on this derelict block.  Across the street two former furniture company buildings still remain.  At one point, they were considered for demolition by the JTA to make room for a downtown bus rapid transit station.



During its early years, this building was occupied by the Hart Furniture Company.



Located next door to the Hart Furniture Company was the Davis Furniture Company.  Before Davis Furniture occupied the building, it housed a poultry supplies entity known as the National Products Company.



Founded in 1889 by John A Cunningham, the Cunningham Furniture Company eventually grew to become one of the Southeast's largest home furnishing businesses before closing in 1984.  For many years, it was one of the tallest buildings in the area.  The image below captures the remains of the Cunningham Furniture Company at the intersection of Forsyth and Broad Streets.  Today, the foundation, which once supported some of the finest pieces of furniture in the city, is used for cheap surface parking.



The Railroad Row district has disappeared primarily due to isolated demolition of small buildings between 1970 and 2000.  The scene of the district today, with the comparisons of images from the past, visually highlights the importance of historic preservation in a pedestrian scale setting.  While we can't fix the destruction done to this once popular setting in the name of "revitalization", we can learn from our past when it comes to the preservation of remaining structures, such as the Laura Trio.


Article by Ennis Davis

Historic Images courtesy of the State Archives of Florida.








38 Comments

simms3

March 21, 2012, 07:18:37 AM
It is AMAZING what Jacksonville destroyed.  The city forever screwed itself over, and that is the mentality that still exists!  Now the city is filled with suburbanite family transplants and 3rd generation natives who simply know no better and know not what the city used to be like, so the mentality that downtown is and should be forgotten/neglected is perpetuated.

Supposedly Jacksonville's rallying point to prevent further demolition was in 1982 with the Union Terminal, but I think it had to be lukewarm at best, and where was everybody in the 50s, 60, and 70s when literally 90% of the city was paved over for surface lots?

In Atlanta the rallying point was 1973 with the potential razing of the Fox by Southern Bell (Atlanta still lost many treasures, including its own Union Station), but that was a really strong rallying point and holds today.  Georgia Tech has wanted to demolish a building that is relatively insignificant, and the city and the whole community continues to protest and block GT's advances towards purchasing and demo'ing the building.  The only buildings razed are projects - and then they are replaced by new garden-style affordable apartments and townhouses.

In NYC the most famous example of public outcry was Penn Station in 1963, and that effort failed, but look at Manhattan now.  Buildings still go down, but bit by bit and only to build further up.  Nothing is razed for surface lots and they just have so many buildings to begin with.  My company has been instrumental in preservation in NYC, particularly in Chelsea where we restored the two largest buildings there (and sold one to Google in 2010 for $1.8B - the largest office deal of the year).  And NYC did not completely destroy its waterfront.

Back to Jacksonville there is just no sense of preservation, history, 21st century thinking whereby we connect to our roots as we reach to the future.  There are still people who just don't care.  Even amongst the more highly educated, business-oriented and potentially intown readers of the Biz Journal there were still a good 15-20% of people who voted that a *private* investor should just demolish the Laura Street trio rather than renovate.

The destroying of the waterfront in Jacksonville for me is particularly damaging as waterfronts are unique to waterfront cities, and Jacksonville would have had the only "northeastern" style waterfront in the south with wharves.

Despite popular belief, Birmingham, Nashville, and Atlanta were all much larger than Jacksonville until the 60s.  Birmingham had over 600,000 people in the 40s and 50s for instance.  Their building fabrics were always more substantial to begin with, but keeping their fabrics was not going to ensure their growth.  Atlanta had to look at building an airport, keeping it civil during the 60s race riots, and going for things like the Olympics to rise above the rest of the south.  But Jacksonville is waterfront in Florida.  It never had to invent expensive gimmicks to ensure its growth, in fact as much as it "sucks" now it is still growing rapidly.  No state income, an unbeatable climate, the beach, etc.  If in fact it had kept its downtown intact AND had developed the suburbs, it could potentially be 3rd in the south behind Atlanta and Miami.  Its tourism could be strong and it could be an attractive place to educated creative types and 21st century businesses.

thelakelander

March 21, 2012, 07:33:26 AM
Good points.  The loss of the waterfront is somewhat disturbing to me as well.  While Atlanta and Birmingham were larger, Jacksonville (173,065) passed Nashville (167,402) before 1940.

http://www.census.gov/population/www/documentation/twps0027/tab17.txt

I'm not as familiar with Nashville during this era but it could be a good comparison case study, considering they have been similar in size/scale since 1920 and both consolidated during the 1960s.

stephendare

March 21, 2012, 07:37:57 AM
Ennis, congratulations on the scope invoked by this article.  We have been discussing the importance of this district to the growth and economy of the city for the past year---ever since we discovered this economic reactor of the past while researching the bordellos so long ago with Beth Slater.

I hadnt seen this piece before today, and its hard to project to our readers how much research you had to do in order to get this information compiled.  magnificent job!

Our history has been so destroyed, and falsified that you had to go back to original sources and references in the old papers of the time to determine what the buildings were used for.

But to be able to invoke even this partial view of what this all was like and what it could have been used for?

just genius.

Thanks.

stephendare

March 21, 2012, 08:02:34 AM
btw,  here is an interesting thing about Jacksonville that only a few living people remember or know about.

We were pretty famous at the turn of the last century as a bottling town (healthy florida mineral water---or so the legends of the time portrayed it---coming from lots and lots of mineral springs)

Check out this (terribly unorganized) list of the bottles, bottling companies, bottled drinks etc from Jacksonville:


http://www.ca-yd.com/html/jaxcomp/jaxcomps.htm
Quote
Bottling Companies and Soda Brands of Jacksonville, Florida

 

Prepared by C.A. Weide, May 2001. The following is a listing of every known soda fountain/soda retailer and soda brand/soft drink bottling company that operated in Jacksonville Florida from 1885-2002. Click on the links at left labeled "Detailed Listings" to obtain details on each company. Additions, corrections and comments encouraged. Please send any updates via E-mail using link at bottom of page. All material and information regarding companies and bottling plants obtained after August 1, 2004, will be high-lighted in blue below and details will be available when the next update is made.

Alphabetical Listing of Companies and Flavors

2001 A & W
1928 A & W Root Beer
1918 Aaron Abisch (soft drinks)
1925 A-B Ginger Ale
1918-28 Abisch, Aaron (soft drinks)
1925 Abner, Jas. (soft drinks)
1924-25 Abood, Namy (soft drinks)
1928-30 Abras, Moses (soft drinks)
1935 Ace High Bar
1948-64 Acosta & Co.
1948-64 Acosta, L. T. & Co.
1935 Acre, Holly (soft drinks)
1935 Adams, Jos. W. (soft drinks)
1926 Adams, Quincy (soft drinks)
1911 Aerated Water Co.
1949-56 AFS Water Service Inc.
1949-56 AFS. Water Service Inc.
1942-44 Akin, Chas. (soft drinks)
1916 Albury, F.L. (soft drinks)
1925 Albury, Saml (soft drinks)
1906 Alford & Rennolds
1919 Allen, B.F. (B.F. Allen)
1919 Allen, B.F. (soft drinks)
1948 Allen, Charles
1948 Allen, Charles R. (Charles R. Allen)
1919 Allen, Thomas (soft drinks)
1919 Allen, Thomas (Thomas Allen)
1923 Allen, T.J. (soft drinks)
1920 Almond, Mrs. M.J. (soft drinks)
1909 Altree
1897-05 Altree Son & Nephew
1898-01 Altree, George
1898-04 Altree, George (George Altree)
1920 Ambrosia
1905 American Club Ginger Ale
1925 Amiker, John (soft drinks)
1929-33 Ancrum, Lizzie (soft drinks)
1923 Anderson, Augustus (soft drinks)
1920 Anderson, J.T. (soft drinks)
1937 Anderson, Mrs. Clara (soft drinks)
1922 Anderson, W.A. (soft drinks)
1917 Angel, Frank (Frank Angel)
1917 Angel, Frank (soft drinks)
1922 Angerholzer, Fred (soft drinks)
1922-25 Anheuser-Busch Ginger Ale
1898-99 Anthony Solary
1875-87 Antonio Solary
1876-77 Antonio Solary Sarsaparilla
1900-01 Antonio & Antonio Jr. Solary
1912 Apoilinaris (spring water)
1926 Aquazone Oxygen Water
1920 Aranguras, Benito
1898 Arcadian Lithia
1915-16 Armour's Grape Juice
1920 Armstrong, Benjamin
1922-24 Armstrong, Bristow (soft drinks)
1938 Arnold Waterman
1925 Arrow Special
1925 Atkinson, Paul (soft drinks)
1927 Atkins, David (soft drinks)
1922 Atkins, Paul (soft drinks)
1919-28 Atlantic Distributing Co.
1919 A.F. Dechman & Company
1949-56 A.F.S. Water Service Inc.
1927 B & O Bar
Unknown B & W Sodas
1941-50 B-1
1933-34 Babbs, Bernice (soft drinks)
1931-33 Babbs, Linsey (soft drinks)
1928 Bacon, Samuel (soft drinks)
1906 Badger Brand Ginger Ale
1928 Bailey, Milsey F. (soft drinks)
1929 Bailey, Robert (soft drinks)
1920 Bailey, Sarah (soft drinks)
1919 Baker, Larkin (soft drinks)
1935 Baker, Pansy (soft drinks)
1922 Baker, S.G. (soft drinks)
1917 Baldwin, J.B.
1917 Baldwin, J.B. (J.B. Baldwin)
1924 Banks, Ella (soft drinks)
1920 Banks, Solomon (soft drinks)
1937 Bansbach, Bernice (soft drinks)
1920 Bardin, G.W. (soft drinks)
1917 Barma
1917 Barma (Blatz Brewing Co.)
1989-00 Barq's
1921 Barry, C.A. (soft drinks)
1946-48 Bartell, Roosevelt (soft drinks)
1943 Bass, Frieda (soft drinks)
1948-49 Batey-Common Co.
1931-32 Beauchamp, Harry (soft drinks)
1920 Beaufont Ginger Ale
1924 Beckett, George (soft drinks)
1933-34 Beckner, Mrs. Rennie (soft drinks)
1935 Beckner, Wallace (soft drinks)
1928 Beers, Orin F. (soft drinks)
1921 Begras, George (soft drinks)
1898 Belfast Ginger Ale
1928 Bellamy, Sim (soft drinks)
1918 Bellwood, Charles (soft drinks)
1921-24 Bell, John (soft drinks)
1921 Bell, Lillie (soft drinks)
1946-49 Bell, Norman (soft drinks)
1925-28 Belton, Jos. S. (soft drinks)
1939-40 Beneby, Osborne (soft drinks)
1919 Benjamin Company
1927 Bennett, John F. (soft drinks)
1929 Bennett, Mrs. Grace (soft drinks)
1922 Bennett, R.R. (soft drinks)
1927 Berloe, Simon (soft drinks)
1942-44 Berrier, John (soft drinks)
1912 Bethesda (spring water)
1922-24 Betros, George (soft drinks)
1924 Betteryet Cigar & Soda Co.
1904-20 Bettes, C. C. Company
1919-23 Bevo
1926 Beyes, August J. (soft drinks)
1928 Bibbons, Mrs. Maude (soft drinks)
1929-36 Big Boy Bott. Co.
1951-62 Big Five Beverages
2001 Big Red
1929?? Big Sixty
1928 Big-Time Corp.
1904-07 Bilz
1920-21 Bingham, J.W. (soft drinks)
1903-19 Bis-Mac
1954 Black Cherry Beverages
1923 Black, M.B. (soft drinks)
1932-33 Blalock Roland (soft drinks)
1941-48 Blank, Lennis (soft drinks)
1919 Blatz
1919 Blatz Beverage
1914 Bloodwine Bottlers Co.
1914-20 Bludwine Bottlers Co.
1913 Bludwine Bottling Company
1913-20 Bludwine Bottling Co.
1915-20 Bludwine Bott. Co., Florida
1926 Blue Bird
1904-12 Blue Lick Springs Water
1922-23 Blue Ribbon Lunch (soft drinks)
1921-25 Blum Beverage Co.
1923 Blum, Charles, Bev. & Grocery Co.
1925 Bobolz
1947 Bobs Cola
1933-34 Bodine, John A. (soft drinks)
1928-35 Bohannon, William (soft drinks)
1927 Bohon, Rane (soft drinks)
1935 Bonacker & Goodrich, Inc.
1936-39 Bonacker, Holt & Acosta, Inc.
1931-32 Bonella, Lose (soft drinks)
1907-16 Boone & Co., Daniel
1916 Boone's Drug Store
1915 Booth & Whitaker
1916 Booth, E.J.
1916 Booth, E.J. (E.J. Booth)
1950 Botl-O
1930 Boulevard Pharmacy
1912 Bowden
1911 Bowden Lithia Water
1912 Bowden (spring water)
1933-34 Bradley, Sarah (soft drinks)
1911-16 Brainol Co., The
1917-19 Brainol Mfg. Co.
1920-23 Bra-Nola Co.
1921-26 Braren, B.K. (soft drinks)
1937-42 Braser Bott. Co.
1918-22 Breden, Henry (soft drinks)
1923 Brewington, Daisy (soft drinks)
1923 Brickley, John (soft drinks)
1907-16 Brinkley & Baines
1907-08 Brinkley & Baines Flats
1921 Brisby, John (soft drinks)
1946 Britton, Alonzo (soft drinks)
1912-16 Broad Rock Spring Water
1912-16 Broad Rock Springs Mineral Water
1912 Broad Rock (spring water)
1935 Brown Derby, The
1963 Brownie
1928 Brown, Benjamin H. (soft drinks)
1942-48 Brown, Bruce (soft drinks)
1924 Brown, B. (soft drinks)
1926 Brown, B.H. (soft drinks)
1927 Brown, Elbert (soft drinks)
1929 Brown, Emma (soft drinks)
1920 Brown, Harold (soft drinks)
1930-31 Brown, Heil Water Co.
1928 Brown, John (soft drinks)
1929-40 Brown, Mary (soft drinks)
1947-49 Brown, Nathan (soft drinks)
1942 Brown, Nathanael (soft drinks)
1941-43 Brown, Saml (soft drinks)
1924 Brown, Susie (soft drinks)
1929 Brown, William (soft drinks)
1925 Brown, Wilson (soft drinks)
1921 Brunson, Lilly (soft drinks)
1920 Bryant, Herbert (soft drinks)
1918-21 Bryant, Pell (soft drinks)
1918 Bryant, W.H. (soft drinks)
1920 Bryant, W.J. (soft drinks)
1918-21 Bryan, J.B. (soft drinks)
1950 Bubble Up
1947 Bubble Up Bottling Co.
1904 Buckhead Lithia
1909-12 Buckhead Mineral Water
1925 Bucklew, J.L. (soft drinks)
1928-30 Buffalo Rock Bottling Co.
1927-30 Buffalo Rock Bott. Co.
1923-30 Buffalo Rock Ginger Ale
1930 Buffalo Rock Ginger Ale Co.
1926 Buie, D.T. (soft drinks)
1940-41 Bunney, Robert (soft drinks)
1918 Burce, W.H. (soft drinks)
1944-48 Burgess, Willie (soft drinks)
1917 Burke, H.E.
1917 Burke, H.E. (H.E. Burke)
1908 Burnette, Charles Co. (Charles Burnette Co.)
1921 Burnside, A.E. (soft drinks)
1920 Butler, J.H. (soft drinks)
1918 Buttons, W.R. (soft drinks)
1923-24 Byard, Prince (soft drinks)
1927 Campbell, Hester
1936-38 Canada Dry Ginger Ale Inc.
1939 Canada Dry Bott. Co. of Jacksonville
1940 Canada Dry Bott. Co. of Florida
1941-58 Canada Dry Bott. Co. of Jacksonville (Inc.)
1955-56 Canada Dry Ginger Ale Co.
1956-57 Canada Dry Bottling Company of Florida Inc.
1959-70 Canada Dry Bott. Co. of Jacksonville (Inc.)
1961-70 Canada Dry Bott. Co. of Florida Inc.
1967 Canada Dry Bott. Co.
1960?? Canada Dry Grapefruit
1898 Cantrell & Cochrane's Ginger Ale
1921 Canty, Aletha
1930-32 Canty, Letha (soft drinks)
1935 Carling Tavern
1920-24 Carn L. & Bros.
1924 Carn, Wilbert (soft drinks)
1932-33 Carrie Fields
1920-22 Carter, Marion (soft drinks)
1925 Caruso, Jas
1930-31 Cascade Bott. Co.
1932-33 Cascade Ginger Ale Co.
1935 Cass, Laura (soft drinks)
1932-32 Cave, The
1899-21 Cedar Springs Water Co.
1915-16 Celestins Vichy
1940 Celo
1935-37 Celo Bott. Co.
1918 Cerva
1928 Chamberlain, Callie (soft drinks)
1936-39 Chambers, Claude (soft drinks)
1922 Chambers, Noah (soft drinks)
1929 Chandler, John (soft drinks)
1930-31 Chaney, Grover (soft drinks)
1920 Chapman, Walter (soft drinks)
1948 Char Mar
1879-94 Charles Blum
1920-25 Charles Blum Bev. Co. Inc.
1923 Charles Blum Bev. & Grocery Co.
1911-18 Charles Blum Co. Inc.
1895-10 Charles Blum & Co.
1908 Charles Burnette Co.
1935 Charles E. Hires Root Beer
1935 Charles E. Hires Root Beer Co.
1948 Charles R. Allen
1939 Char-Mar Bott. Wks.
1923 Chas. Blum Beverage Co. Inc.
1919 Chas. Blum Bev. Co.
1940 Chavis, Rosita (soft drinks)
1922 Chavous, Beulah (soft drinks)
1927 Cheatham & Runyon
1928 Cheatham, Lewis (soft drinks)
1977 Chek
1977 Chek Flavors
1925-28 Chelf's Drug Store
1928 Chero Cola Bottling Wks.
1887 Chero-Cola
1915-28 Chero-Cola
1923-26 Chero-Cola Bottling Co.
1928 Chero-Cola Bottling Works
1925 Cherry, Thomas
1927 Cherry, William (soft drinks)
1948 Chitty & Co.
1927 Chocolate Bubbles
1930-31 Citrus By-Products Co. Inc.
1963 Citrus Products Co.
1929 Clamer, Winnie (soft drinks)
1928 Clanton, John (soft drinks)
1926-28 Clark & Lewis, Inc.
1921 Clark, Sophronia (soft drinks)
1925 Clayton, Prince (soft drinks)
1986-01 Clearly Canadian
1947-57 Clicquot Club
1923 Clicquot Club Birch Beer
1950 Clicquot Club Bottling Co.
1947-57 Clicquot Club Bott. Co.
1919-30 Clicquot Club Ginger Ale
1923 Clicquot Club Root Beer
1923 Clicquot Club Sarsaparilla
1951 Clicquot Club-Grapette
1951 Clicquot Club-Grapette Bottling Co.
1939-41 Climpson, George (soft drinks)
1947-57 Cliquot Club Bott. Co.
1950 Cliquot Club Bott. Co. of Jacksonville
1925-28 Cloud, Gus (soft drinks)
1925 Cluxton, Nellie (soft drinks)
1929-32 Coachman, Lee (soft drinks)
1923 Coburn, L.E. (soft drinks)
1954-63 Coca-Cola Co.
1904-74 Coca-Cola Bottling Co.
1951-55 Coca-Cola Bott. Co. of Atlanta
1976-77 Coca-Cola Bottling Co. of Jacksonville
1916-66 Coca-Cola Bott. Co., Florida
1904-71 Coca-Cola Bott. Co., Jacksonville
1955 Coca-Cola Bott. Co., Jacksonville Bottlers
1950-53 Coca-Cola Bott. Co., Jacksonville Distributors
1947-63 Coca-Cola Bott. Co., Miami
1965 Coca-Cola Bott. Co., Southside
1969-73 Coca-Cola U.S.A.
1938 Coca-Pina
1950 Cock'n Bull Ginger Beer
2001 Coco Rico Soda
1926 Coco-Lax Co.
1925-26 Coco-Lax Co., The
1904-05 Coco-Phosphate Co.
1905 Coco-Phosphate Co. Inc.
2001 Coco-Rico Soda
1923-24 Cohen, Joseph (soft drinks)
1928 Cohen, Max (soft drinks)
1909 Cola Ale
1942-44 Coleman, Ernestine (soft drinks)
1927 Collins, Jefferson (soft drinks)
1941-42 Collins, John (soft drinks)
1931-35 Colonnade, The
1947-51 Common & Co.
1941-46 Common & Macclinchey
1929 Conner, Neal (soft drinks)
1914-20 Consolidated Bludwine
1914-20 Consolidated Bludwine Bottling Co.
1919 Cook's
1943 Cooner, George (soft drinks)
1925 Cooper, Robert (soft drinks)
1927 Coral Rock Ginger Ale
1927-33 Coral Rock Ginger Ale Co.
1929 Coral Rock Ginger Ale Co. Inc.
1916 Corbett, Andrew (soft drinks)
1935-46 Corbett, Jas (soft drinks)
1929 Corbitt, Asbury (soft drinks)
1931-32 Cornelius, Stubbs (soft drinks)
1942-43 Cotton, Lucy (soft drinks)
1959 Country Club Sparkling Water
1986-01 Country Time
1935 Cowart, Jas (soft drinks)
1921 Cox, Colamer (soft drinks)
1921-22 Crabtree, G.W. (soft drinks)
1944-46 Craddock, Jas (soft drinks)
1931-33 Craig, Andrew (soft drinks)
1932-34 Crazy Crystal Co.
1934 Crazy Crystal Water Co.
1935-39 Crazy Water Crystals Co.
1949 Crescent Beverages
1936 Crews, Lee (soft drinks)
1946 Croom, John (soft drinks)
1932-32 Crosby, Alf (soft drinks)
1935 Crowd, Danl (soft drinks)
1910(?) Crown Bottling Company
1910(?) Crown Bottling Co.
1986-01 Crush
1940-48 Cuba-Kola
1933-34 Cummings, Edward (soft drinks)
1920-22 Cummings, George (soft drinks)
1925-27 Cummings, Hazel (soft drinks)
1927 Cusimano, Jos
1926-28 C.W. Zaring & Co.
1923-31 Dailey, Wm. (soft drinks)
1920 Daniels, John (soft drinks)
1926 Daniels, Robinson (soft drinks)
1943-44 Daniel, Mack (soft drinks)
1944-48 Davis, Diamond (soft drinks)
1932-34 Davis, Etta (soft drinks)
1925 Davis, Henry (soft drinks)
1916 Davis, J.T. (soft drinks)
1925 Davis, Minnie (soft drinks)
1933-36 Davis, Rosa (soft drinks)
1925-33 Davis, Wm. H. (soft drinks)
1939-40 Dawson, Jack (soft drinks)
1941-42 Dawson, Pearl (soft drinks)
1921 Day, J.R. (soft drinks)
1924-26 Debardelaben, J.W. (soft drinks)
1927 Debrause, Jas. (soft drinks)
1919 Dechman, A.F. & Company
1940-50 Delaware Punch
1939-40 DeLoach, Pierpont (soft drinks)
1929 & Dennis, Lucile (soft drinks)
1928 Dennis, Saml. (soft drinks)
1922 Devampert, Anderson (soft drinks)
1919-24 Dewitt, Oliver (soft drinks)
1971-00 Diet Pepsi
1964-01 Diet Rite
1964-01 Diet Rite Cola
1929 Dingle, Frank (soft drinks)
1961 Dixie
1920 Dixie Beverage Company
1921-65 Dixie Bottling Works (Inc.)
1921-65 Dixie Bott. Works (Inc.)
1969 Dixie Land Paper & Packaging
1923 Dixon, J.H. (soft drinks)
1931-32 D'Letha, Bentley (soft drinks)
1926 Dodd, J.B. (soft drinks)
1923 Dodge, J.B. (soft drinks)
1920 Dorr, G.C. (soft drinks)
1922-23 Doster, George (soft drinks)
1973 Double-Cola Bottling Co.
1973 Double-Cola Bott. Co.
1926-28 Douglas, W.L. (soft drinks)
1939 Dove, Jas. (soft drinks)
1937 Dragonette, The
1923 Drawdy, Emily (soft drinks)
1935 Drummond, Jas. (soft drinks)
1930-62 Dr. Herring's Ginger Ale Co.
1904-00 Dr. Pepper
1933-36 Dr. Pepper Bottling Company Inc.
1963-70 Dr. Pepper Bottling Co.
1933 Dr. Pepper Bottling Co. Inc.
1962-67 Dr. Pepper Bottling Co., Jacksonville
1972-73 Dr. Pepper Bott. Co.
1938-53 Dr. Pepper Bott. Co., Florida
1937 Dr. Pepper/Pure Ice & Bev.
1937 Dr. Pepper/Pure Ice & Bev. Co.
1947-50 Dr. Swett's Root Beer
1921 Durham, Clifford (soft drinks)
1941-42 Duval Bott. Co.
1928 Duval, John (soft drinks)
1942 Dykes, Elmira (soft drinks)
1973-74 D/B/A Pepsi-Cola-Seven Up
1973-74 D/B/A Pepsi-Cola-Seven Up Bottlers of Jacksonville
1916 E.L. Booth
1919-40 Elixir Water Co.
1923 Elixir Mineral Water Co.
1919 Elliott's Pharmacy
1895-09 Eureka Bottling Works
1945-46 Evervess
1919 50-50
1919 Famo
1911 Fan-Taz
1932-33 Fields, Carrie (Carrie Fields)
1921-48 Fifty-Fifty Bott. Works
1926-28 Fifty Fifty Bott. Co.
1929-36 Fifty Fifty Bott. Co. Inc.
1919-29 Fitch & Wilkinson
1930-42 Fitch-Wilkinson Inc.
1968-86 Florida Beverage Corp.
1937-41 Florida Beverages Inc.
1914-20 Florida Bludwine Bottling Co.
1923-31 Florida Bottlers Co. Inc.
1931-32 Florida Citrus Bev. Co.
1916-96 Florida Coca-Cola Bottling Co.
1938-67 Florida Dr. Pepper Bott. Co.
1925-40 Florida Fresh Water Co.
1906-07 Florida Koca-Nola Bott. Co.
1915-20 Florida Provision Co.
1932-33 Fountain of Youth Products Co.
1917 Frank Angel (soft drinks)
1968-71 Fresca
1950 Frostie Bottling Co. of Jacksonville
1951-69 Frostie Bott. Co.
1951 Frostie Old Fashioned Root Beer
1920 F.W. King & Co.
 

stephendare

March 21, 2012, 08:03:15 AM
Quote
1899-00 G. Muller & Co.
1911 Gus Muller & Co.
1923 Gangi Bros. Beverage Co.
1940 Gasparilla Ginger Ale
1953-61 Gator Beverages
1972-74 Gatorade
1911-13 Gay-Ola Co.
1887 George Henry
1908-18 Glendale Co.
1909 Glenn
1905-12 Glenn Springs Mineral Water
1916 Golden Ribbon Bev. Assoc.
1923 Good Grape
1927 Good Hope Mineral Water
1923 Good Hope Mineral Water Co.
1929-63 Good Hope Water Co.
1920 Gosman Ginger Ale
1920 Gosman Lemon Soda
1920 Gosman Root Beer
1920 Gosman Sarsaparilla
1923 Grape Bouquet
1942 Grapette
1947-57 Grapette Bottling Co.
1956-67 Grapette
1963 Grapette-Sunburst Bott. Co.
1923 Grapico Bottling Works
1912 Great Bear (spring water)
1920 Green River
1928 Groover-Stewart Drug Co.
1949 Gulf Chocolate
1941-52 Gulf Coast Beverages (Inc.)
1940 Gulf Root Beer
1908 Guy Cigar Co.
1917 H.E. Burke
1908 Hagan's Root Beer
1904 Hagan & Dodds Root Beer
1909 Hampton Mineral Water
1916 Hampton Springs Water Co.
1905-15 Hanne Bros.
1916 Hanne Bros. Phosphate Sales Co.
1918 Hanne Bros.
1926 Harney-Judy Fruit Co.
1927 Harney-Morrow Fruit Company
1909-12 Harris Lithia Water
1999-01 Hawaiian Punch
1916 Heard & Snyder
1930-31 Heil Brown Water Co.
1887 Henry, George
1947 Hep
???? Henry & Heitz Bottling Works
1925 Herman Bobolz
1929 Herring Beverage Co. Inc.
1930-34 Herring Ginger Ale Co.
1935-36 Herring Ginger Ale Co. Inc.
1937-56 Herring Ginger Ale Inc.
1946-49 Herring Ginger Ale
1951-53 Herring Ginger Ale Bott. Co.
1960-62 Herring Beverages
1962 Herring Ginger Ale
1950 Hi-Spot
1947 Hi-Cola Bottling Co.
1944 High C Cola Bott. Co.
1909 Hires
1950 Hires-Nesbitt Bottling Co. of Florida Inc.
1955 Hires Root Beer
1965-70 Hires Root Beer Bottling Co.
1909 Holly
1909 Holly Springs
1937 Home Beverage Co.
1947-48 Home Beverage Delivery
1909 Hygeia Mineral Water
1904-07 Ironbrew
1959 I. Y. Inc.
1907-16 J. Daniel Boone & Co.
1917 J.B. Baldwin
1950 J. D. Tomlinson Beverage Co.
1925 Jacksonville-Atlantic Distributing Co.
1914-17 Jacksonville Bottlers and Fountain Supply Co.
1901-30 Jacksonville Bottling Works
1915-27 Jacksonville Chero-Cola Bott. Co.
1955 Jacksonville Coca-Cola Bottling Co. Bottlers
1950-53 Jacksonville Coca-Cola Bottling Co. Distributors
1903-86 Jacksonville Coca-Cola Bottling Co.
1962-67 Jacksonville Dr. Pepper Bott. Co.
1913 Jacksonville Gay-ola Bottling Co.
1966-69 Jacksonville Icee Corp.
1970-71 Jacksonville Ice Corp.
1909 Jacksonville Mineral Water Co.
1907 Jacksonville Mfg Co.
1928-31 Jacksonville Nehi Bottling Co.
1908-11 Jacksonville Pepsi-Cola Bott. Co.
1915 Jacksonville Soda Co.
1917 Jacksonville Tripure Water Co.
1893-12 Jacksonville Steam Bott. Works, The
1898 James F. Lynch
1944-46 Jax Cola Co.
1930 Jax Ice & Cold Storage Co., Inc.
1889-92 J. H. Kornahrens Sr.
1895 J. L. Kornahrens & Co.
1892 John C. Raabe
1913 John's English Brew Ginger Beer
1882-16 John L. Kornahrens
1905 John L. Kornahrens Bott. Works
1889-91 John Wedding
1898-01 John Zahm/Zahn
1898-16 Joseph Zapf
1947 Joyner Beverages
1919 Kass Produce Company
1920 King, F.W. & Co.
1906 Koca-Nola Company
1882-84 Kornahren, John L.
1886-87 Kornahrens & Wedding
1889-92 Kornahrens, J.H. Sr.
1891-92 Kornahrens Steam Bott. Works
1895 Kornahrens, J.L. & Co.
1896 Kornahrens & Co.
1897-07 Kornahrens, J. L.
1905 Kornahrens, John L. Bott. Works
1908-18 Kornahrens, J. L.
1948-64 L.T. Acosta & Co.
1908 Lackawanna Natural Springs Water Co.
1916 Lackawanna Water & Ginger Ale Co.
1913 Lackawanna Water Co. Inc.
1968 Laney Water Conditioning Inc.
1919 Larkin Baker (soft drinks)
1938 Lawrence M. Moseley
1892 L.D. Townsend
1898 Leake & M'Neil
1940 Lemmy
1908 Lemo-Lime
1955 Like
1920-22 Lime Cola Bott. Co.
1946-47 Lime Cola Bottling Co. of Jacksonville
1947 Lime Cola Bottling Co. of Florida
1948 Lime Cola Bott. Co.
1941 Lime Dry Kola
1965-67 Lindsay Soft Water Co. of Jacksonville
1928 Logan-Boardman Co.
1912 Londonderry (spring water)
1898 Lynch
1932-33 Magnolia Mineral Water Co.
1929 Magnolia Water Supply Co.
1929 Magonial Water Supply Co.
1947 Main Line
1903 Malt Nutrine
1912 Manacea (spring water)
1919 Marx Bros.
1882 Mason & Heitz Bottling Works
1950 Mason's Old Fashioned Root Beer
1924-33 Matay Bott. Works (Inc.)
1927 Mavis Bottling Co. or America
1928 Mavis Bott. Co.
1929 Mavis Bott. Co. of Florida
1927 Mavis Chocolate
1930 Mavis NuIcy Bottling Co. of Florida
1929 Maytag Bott. Wks. Inc.
1923 Mecca Products Co.
1902-03 Metto Co. , The
1904-09 Metto Brand
1893 Meyer, Muller & Co.
1924 Mi-Grape
1947-63 Miami Coca-Cola Bottling Co.
1939 Mil-K-Botl
1950 Mil-Kay
1952 Mil-Kay Orange
1941 Mission Beverages
1947 Mission Orange
1999-01 Mistic
1927 Mountain Valley Ginger Ale
1927 Mountain Valley Water Co.
1947-48 Mountain Valley Water Co.
1941 Moxie
1905 Muller & Co.
1895 Muller & Robertson
1928-31 Nehi Bott. Co., Jacksonville
1943-60 Neal Tyler & Sons
1929 Nehi Corp.
1929 Ne-Hi Bott. Co.
1931-33 Nehi Bott. Co.
1935-36 Nehi Bottling Corp. of Jacksonville
1936-37 Nehi Bottling Corp.
1938 Nehi Bottling Corp. of Jacksonville
1968-70 Nehi Bottling Co.
1947 Nesbitt
1950 Nesbitts
1936 New Yorker Ginger Ale
1925 NIB
1924-39 Nu-Grape Co. of Florida
1899 Nu-Grape Bottling Co.
1947-55 Nu Grape
1929 Nu-Icy
1912 Nuvida (spring water)
1921-25 Orange Crush Bott. Co.
1924-28 Orange Crush Bott. Co. of Florida
1930-36 Orange Crush Beverages Inc.
1941 Orange Crush
1937 Orange-Crush Florida Beverages Inc.
1950 Old Colony
1947 Olmstead Bottling Co.
1949 Olmstead Orange Crush Bott. Co.
1926-28 Orange Squeeze Bott. Co.
1906-11 Ossinsky, Phillip
1946-54 Padgett Beverages
1955 Padgett Beverages & Bottling
1956-65 Padgett Beverages
1936 Pal-O
1909-11 Palmetto Phosphate
1916-17 Palmetto Phosphate Sales Co.
1938-63 Par-T-Pak
1904-07 Peach Mellow
1885(?) Peoples Bottling Wks.
1919 Pep
1939 Peppo Supreme Beverages
1909 Pep-To-Lac
1908-11 Pepsi-Cola Bott. Co., Jacksonville
1908-43 Pepsi-Cola Bottling Co.
1944-68 Pepsi-Cola Bott. Co. of Jacksonville (Inc.)
1969-73 Pepsi-Cola Allied Bottlers Inc.
1973-74 Pepsi-Cola Seven-Up Bottlers
1973-83 Pepsi-Cola Seven-Up G.C.C. Beverage Inc.
1980-83 Pepsi-Cola Seven-Up Bottlers of Jacksonville Inc.
1986 Pepsi-Cola Bottlers of Jacksonville General Cinema Corp.
1989-00 Pepsi-Cola Bottlers of Jacksonville
2001 Pepsi-Cola Bottlers
2002 Pepsi Bottling Group, The
1906-11 Phillip Ossinsky
1917 Pinap-a Co.
1915-16 Pin-Ap-ola Bott. Co.
1939-40 Pi-Nella
1948 Players
1912 Poland (spring water)
1941-51 Pop Cola Bottling Co.
1947 Pop Cola
1959 Pop Kola
1960-65 PopKola-Grapette Bottling Co.
1940 Pora Water Co.
1919 Porter-Hagood Co.
1913 Pura Ginger-Ale
1915-42 Pura Water Co.
1935-37 Pure Carbonic Inc.
1935-38 Pure Ice & Bev. Co.
1936 Pure Water Co.
1925 Queen Bass Dist. Co.
1928 Quincho Root Beer Stand
1928-32 Quencho Bev. Co.
1931-32 Quench Root Beer
1932-33 Quench Root Beer Stand
1912 Quisisanna (spring water)
1892 Raabe, John C.
2001 RC Cola
1903 Red Rock Ginger Ale
1906-11 Red Rock Co.
1947-48 Red Rock Bott. Co. of Jacksonville
1948 Red Rock Bottling Co.
1946 Red Rock Cola
1960-62 Regent Beverages Inc.
1919 Reif's Special
1942-50 Rice Bott. Co.
1911 Robt. W. Simms Co.
1936-38 Rock & Rye Bott. Co.
1933-36 Rosa Davis (soft drinks)
1938 Royal Crown
1939-71 Royal Crown Bott. Co.
1947 Royal Crown Bottling Co. of Jacksonville
1940-65 Royal Palm
1931-32 Royal Sales Co.
1899 Russell
1889-18 R. W. Simms
1950 St. Johns Bottling Co.
1925 Samuel Stewart
1903 Sarsaparilla Brew
1911-20 Saussy & Co.
1921-24 Saussy & Common
1925-39 Saussy, Common & Macclinchey
1919 Schlitz Famo
1960-62 Schweppes
1989-01 Schweppes
2001 Seabev
1896 Sebago Bott. Co.
1937-69 Seven-Up Bott. Co. of Jacksonville, Inc.
1906 Sheboygan Mineral Water
1926 Shadow Lawn Ginger Ale
1922 Sherman Stafford
1927 Shivar Pale Dry Ginger Ale
1938 Silver Sparkles
1910 Simmons, A.L.
1911-14 Simmons Bott. Co.
1883 Simms
1889-18 Simms, R.W.
1918 Smith-Richardson-Connoy, Inc.
1928 Smith, Richardson & Conroy, Inc.
1885-87 Solary, Antonio
1927 Southern Drug Company
1913-15 Southern English Ginger Beer Co.
1986-01 Southeast-Atlantic Corp.
1999 Southeast-Atlantic Beverage Corp.
2001 Southeast-Atlantic Beverage
1927 Southern Fruit Bev. Co. Inc.
1965 Southside Coca-Cola Bottling Co.
1967 Sprite
1947-50 Spur
1955 Spur Distributing Co. Inc.
1939 Squirt
1950 Squirt Bottling Co. of Jacksonville
1959-67 Squirt
2001 Squirt
1922 Stafford
1907-16 Standard Bott. Works
1904-12 Stafford Springs Water
1886-99 Star Bottling Works
1900-10 Star Bott. Co.
1910-17 Star Bottling Works
1925 Stewart, Samuel
1949 Strawberry Malt
1933-34 Su-No-Wa
1933-38 Su-No-Way
1939-55 Sun Crest Bev. Inc.
1949-51 Sun Crest Beverage Co.
1953 Suncrest Beverage
1935-37 Sun Springs Water Co. Inc.
1936 Sun Water Co.
1936 Sun Water
1960-67 Sunburst Flavors
1963 Sunburst
1999-01 Sunkist
1957 Sunny Isles Quinine Water
1929-31 Sunshine Bev. Co.
1967 Tab
2001 Tahitian Treat
1909-18 Tate Spring Water
1967 Teem
1938 The Sparkles Co.
1919 Allen, Thomas
1933-46 Thomas Beverages
1936-37 Thomas Bev. Co.
1923 Todd Brothers Bottling Co.
1956-57 Tom Collins
1950 Tomlinson, J.D. Beverage Co.
1904-07 Topaz Lithia Ginger Ale
1965 Topp Cola
1892 Townsend, L.D.
1924 Tripura Water
1939 Tripure
1904-05 Tropical Mfg Co.
1933-34 Tru Fruit Distributors
1936-38 Tru Fruit Distributor
1942-51 Tru-Fruit Bott. Co.
1959 Tru-Fruit Flavors
1925-36 Try-Me Bott. Co.
1926 Try-Me Beverage Co.
1950 Try-Me
1946 Two-way (2-Way)
1950-60 Tyler, Neal and Sons
1927 United Produce Company
1926 Utica Club Bev. Co.
1943 V Beverage Co.
1926 Valley Forge Distributing Co.
1895 Vandross, D. E.
1999-01 Vernors
1904-12 Veronica Springs Water
1919 W.T. Williams
1895 Wamboldt, A. W.
1923-26 Ward's Lemon Crush
1921-26 Ward's Lime Crush
1919-27 Ward's Orange Crush
1928 Wascott Club Dry Ginger Ale
1938 Waterman, Arnold (Arnold Waterman)
1898 Waukesha Arcadian Company
2001 Welch's
1919 We-No
1989-91 Wedding, John
1909 Welaka Mineral Water
1904-12 West Baden Springs Water
1926-27 Whiddon Stores
1926-27 Whiddon's Cash Stores
1963-67 Whistle
1920-57 Whistle Bottling Co.
1924-25 Whistle Co. of the South
1925 Whistle Co. of Florida
1947-49 Whistle-Vess Bott. Co.
1953 Whistle-Vess Bott. Co. Inc.
1950-51 Whistle-Vess Cola Bott. Co.
1953-62 Whistle-Vess Cola Bott. Co. Inc.
1912 White Rock (spring water)
1963-65 White Rock
1909 White Springs Mineral Waters
1903 White, Walton & Co.
1912 Whittle (spring water)
1935-36 Wi-Wauchula Water Co. Inc. of Fla.
1936 Wi-Wauchula Water Co. Inc.
1925-33 Wm. H. Davis (soft drinks)
1919 W.T. Williams
1946 Wizzard Water Agency
1941 Yukon Club Beverages
1897 Zahm/Zahn
1898 Zapf
1926-28 Zaring, C.W. & Co.

BridgeTroll

March 21, 2012, 08:06:32 AM
Ennis, congratulations on the scope invoked by this article.  We have been discussing the importance of this district to the growth and economy of the city for the past year---ever since we discovered this economic reactor of the past while researching the bordellos so long ago with Beth Slater.

I hadnt seen this piece before today, and its hard to project to our readers how much research you had to do in order to get this information compiled.  magnificent job!

Our history has been so destroyed, and falsified that you had to go back to original sources and references in the old papers of the time to determine what the buildings were used for.

But to be able to invoke even this partial view of what this all was like and what it could have been used for?

just genius.

Thanks.

Thank you Stephen for articulating what I was also thinking... Great Job Ennis!

stephendare

March 21, 2012, 08:08:23 AM


The Metropolis (owned by the L'Engle Family) ran weekly contests for people to come up with menus from jacksonville's food shops.

This one, by a Springfield woman, listed three different locally bottled drinks in 1913.

stephendare

March 21, 2012, 08:11:22 AM


If you read the above article carefully, you will see that the new association was addressed by the mayor at the time, John Martin----the same man in the photo from the article who went on to become governor

Quote


This image of Florida East Coast Railway staff was taken inside the Atlantic & East Coast Terminal Company's warehouse.  Standing on the left is John W. Martin.  Martin would become 24th Governor of Florida, in office from 1925 to 1929.

peestandingup

March 21, 2012, 08:12:59 AM
There wasn't a sense of preservation or planning, and that mentality is obviously still around today (Springfield's struggles as an example & our huge sprawling footprint that never ends). It's those single factors that doesn't give me high hopes for the city overall. I don't know that its "forever screwed", but it sure is for a while. That stuff is really difficult to reign back in & recover from. And leadership still seems to be asleep at the wheel regarding these things, including transit.

Speaking of which, looking through these pictures it still blows my mind that someone thought it was a good idea to not only level half the town, but put a raised transit system OVER the barren land, like it was just too lively down there on the ground or something. And at a cost of $70 Million a mile no less. Brilliant.

simms3

March 21, 2012, 08:22:38 AM
Good points.  The loss of the waterfront is somewhat disturbing to me as well.  While Atlanta and Birmingham were larger, Jacksonville (173,065) passed Nashville (167,402) before 1940.

http://www.census.gov/population/www/documentation/twps0027/tab17.txt

I'm not as familiar with Nashville during this era but it could be a good comparison case study, considering they have been similar in size/scale since 1920 and both consolidated during the 1960s.

I guess I should have specified counties.

Duval County 1940 - 210,143, 774 sq. miles, 272 ppsm

Davidson County TN 1940 - 257,267, 502 sq. miles, 512 ppsm

Fulton County + Dekalb County GA 1940 (ATL is in both) - 479,828, 797 sq. miles, 602 ppsm (392,886 in Fulton alone over 502 sq. miles, 743 ppsm in 1940)

Jefferson County KY 1940 - 385,392, 385 sq. miles, 1,000 ppsm already in 1940

Jefferson County AL 1940 - 459,930, 1,113 sq. miles (though mostly uninhabitable), 413 ppsm (B'ham was the king of the south until the 60s)

Shelby County TN 1940 - 358,250, 755 sq. miles, 475 ppsm

And of course NOLA and Richmond were already huge, and surprisingly Chattanooga and Spartanburg were similar in size to Jacksonville at this point.  Hamilton County TN had 180,478 people in 1940 over 542 sq. miles (333 ppsm).


I guess my ultimate point is that Jacksonville was dense and thriving for the relatively small size it was, and that was due to its waterfront, its location as a winter destination in FL, and its utilization of the economies of its day.  The city has completely lost all of that.

Garden guy

March 21, 2012, 08:35:29 AM
Good ole southern conservative leadership...dontcha just love it?

ChriswUfGator

March 21, 2012, 09:01:09 AM
Sounds like the Jacksonville "Renaissance" was a smashing success...

thelakelander

March 21, 2012, 09:04:29 AM
Good points.  The loss of the waterfront is somewhat disturbing to me as well.  While Atlanta and Birmingham were larger, Jacksonville (173,065) passed Nashville (167,402) before 1940.

http://www.census.gov/population/www/documentation/twps0027/tab17.txt

I'm not as familiar with Nashville during this era but it could be a good comparison case study, considering they have been similar in size/scale since 1920 and both consolidated during the 1960s.

I guess I should have specified counties.

Duval County 1940 - 210,143, 774 sq. miles, 272 ppsm

Davidson County TN 1940 - 257,267, 502 sq. miles, 512 ppsm

Fulton County + Dekalb County GA 1940 (ATL is in both) - 479,828, 797 sq. miles, 602 ppsm (392,886 in Fulton alone over 502 sq. miles, 743 ppsm in 1940)

Jefferson County KY 1940 - 385,392, 385 sq. miles, 1,000 ppsm already in 1940

Jefferson County AL 1940 - 459,930, 1,113 sq. miles (though mostly uninhabitable), 413 ppsm (B'ham was the king of the south until the 60s)

Shelby County TN 1940 - 358,250, 755 sq. miles, 475 ppsm

And of course NOLA and Richmond were already huge, and surprisingly Chattanooga and Spartanburg were similar in size to Jacksonville at this point.  Hamilton County TN had 180,478 people in 1940 over 542 sq. miles (333 ppsm).


I guess my ultimate point is that Jacksonville was dense and thriving for the relatively small size it was, and that was due to its waterfront, its location as a winter destination in FL, and its utilization of the economies of its day.  The city has completely lost all of that.

Simms, thanks for your detailed explanation.  Now I understand where you were coming from in regards to community size from that era. 

As an urban planner, I tend to view the demographics between pre and post WWII american cities as being different.  For example, a rum running trip from Jacksonville to Pablo Beach would have took a full day during Prohibition.  That trip would have been all woods once out of South Jacksonville.  Despite being in Duval County, a place like Mandarin was its own city and not economically reliant on Jacksonville.  Given the era and technology of the time, I believe its safe a former farming community like Antioch in Davidson County would have had its own separate economy that wasn't reliant on Nashville before WWII as well. 

Quote
I guess my ultimate point is that Jacksonville was dense and thriving for the relatively small size it was, and that was due to its waterfront, its location as a winter destination in FL, and its utilization of the economies of its day.

I agree.  Looking back, about a decade ago, I started making it a point to visit nearly every city in this list that had a population of 100k or above before 1920:

http://www.census.gov/population/www/documentation/twps0027/tab16.txt

The majority had decently developed dense urban cores because that's simply how communities were developed during the era before the interstate highway system and suburban zoning regulations came to dominate our society.  For me, it's been pretty cool to discover what each community has done with their urban core in the last half century.  Unfortunately, it appears that Jax was one of the leaders in detonating a significant chunk of ours in a relatively short time period.

thelakelander

March 21, 2012, 09:13:25 AM
Supposedly Jacksonville's rallying point to prevent further demolition was in 1982 with the Union Terminal, but I think it had to be lukewarm at best, and where was everybody in the 50s, 60, and 70s when literally 90% of the city was paved over for surface lots?

I think we're still waiting for that true rallying point or it may be occurring right before our eyes with the Laura Trio and the mothballing efforts in Springfield.  Historically, we've tended to stand up for specific buildings or neighborhoods from time to time but we've never really embraced preservation in a manner that sibling communities like Savannah and New Orleans have.  When the rally came to save the old terminal half of Railroad Row was still standing.  However, a good chunk of it was taken out by the horrible plan to "clean up" LaVilla and buildings are still coming down around the courthouse site.

thelakelander

March 21, 2012, 09:35:43 AM
Ennis, congratulations on the scope invoked by this article.  We have been discussing the importance of this district to the growth and economy of the city for the past year---ever since we discovered this economic reactor of the past while researching the bordellos so long ago with Beth Slater.

I hadnt seen this piece before today, and its hard to project to our readers how much research you had to do in order to get this information compiled.  magnificent job!

Our history has been so destroyed, and falsified that you had to go back to original sources and references in the old papers of the time to determine what the buildings were used for.

But to be able to invoke even this partial view of what this all was like and what it could have been used for?

just genius.

Thanks.

Thanks.  As you know, we've been interested in the history of this district for years and this brief article doesn't highlight 99.5% of it's rich history and stories behind the people and buildings that once stood there (and even the few still standing).  Two of the sites in the soon to be released Reclaiming Jacksonville book (Jax Terminal Tunnels & WP Sumner Company) were once a part of this district.  Researching their past revealed additional stories, people, and companies from this district that all deserve to be topics of their own.



From an economic standpoint, there's no telling how many thousands of people were employed in the railroad industry by itself.  The train station alone employed 2,000.  That's equal to downtown attracting Everbank except Everbank won't bring as many spin off support jobs as the railroad and maritime industries did during that era.  While we can't recreate what was lost, learning and understanding downtown's economic history does help one to come to the realization why many of the redevelopment plans over the last half century have failed. 


Inside the Railway Express Agency's terminal in 1948.


Caribbean Fruit and Steamship Company providing bananas for produce trucks in 1948.

In short, we've focused too much on expensive gimmicks without attempting to lay the ground work for a natural self organizing sustainable urban environment.  Jacksonville's position of being a logistics community created the vibrant place that downtown once was.  While it doesn't necessarily hurt, throwing money at downtown isn't the most pressing concern.  How we over regulate the core, which stymies the natural market, should be the focus.  Perhaps its time to better take advantage of the river and railroad related assets that still remain in addition to modifying public policy?

Ocklawaha

March 21, 2012, 09:42:51 AM
This was an excellent piece Ennis!

Keeping the old waterfront is a major theme of many of our articles, and while it would indeed be cool to have a 'working waterfront' today, it's just not possible, at least not in any historic sense.

The changes that have occurred in the transportation of freight were already moving full force by the end of WWII. General merchandise boxcars were 'super sized,' and as distribution centers and warehousing moved away from the railroads in many locations, those cars morphed into semi-trailers. In the 60's and 70's the hottest ticket on the railroad was a solid block of 'piggyback TOFC semi-trailers' rolling non-stop between major metro centers. How much parking space would we have needed for a 100 car train of 200 vans, 5x each day?

Where there were once literally thousands of men loading and unloading individual boxes and crates, and bulk cargo by the net full, they were quickly replaced by large cranes, and fork lift trucks. Small steamships became much larger and started taking on a scale of truck-load lot proportions.

Some of this traffic could still have been loaded in a downtown waterfront such as ours, but as the train lengths grew, and the industry looked for economies, the container was born. Today maritime shipping is all about the 'TEU' or 20' foot container (larger containers are measured in 20' TEU's, so a 40' is 2 X TEU). With the containerized cargo came even larger cargo vessels, and today we are looking at truly aircraft carrier sized 'Post Panamax' ships.

These ships of 8,000 or more containers CAN be completely unloaded and set in a container yard, truck, or rail car, WITHOUT a human element.

No matter how hard we might have tried to keep a working waterfront, it wouldn't have happened and today we'd probably be complaining as the city was in roughly 1960 that the whole dock, warehouse, waterfront complex is rotting and falling into the St. Johns River.

I agree that this was a much more 'human' time, and the downtown was blessed by it's location. However today it is simply impractical to think anyone would want this labor intensive method of shipping for nostalgia's sake. As we struggle with hundreds of empty lots stupidly left in the wake of hopeful investors or irresponsible owners, imagine how much more we would struggle had that shipping industry stayed downtown. Safe to say the whole area south of Union and north of the River would be a massive container lot. Downtown Jacksonville would be straddling the Trout River.

Keeping a few of the old docks in place would have been wise, provided there would have been a way to maintain them through those transition years. Today, interesting little 'import' shops, food vendors and perhaps our local crab boat industry could call them home. But in a downtown where fishing in OUR river is illegal, and roller skates are a capital crime, I wouldn't hold out much hope.

So today we have a downtown created for automobiles, where we could have had one created for the container... Somewhere in all of this the HUMAN ELEMENT got left waiting for the next streetcar.

BridgeTroll

March 21, 2012, 09:56:56 AM
What affect did the attempt to transform Jacksonville into "The Bold New City of the South" impact the destruction of this area?  By that I mean the desire to transition the city from a blue collar industrial (rail and shipping) economy to a white collar financial center type economy... of the Atlanta model for example.

stephendare

March 21, 2012, 10:08:47 AM
What affect did the attempt to transform Jacksonville into "The Bold New City of the South" impact the destruction of this area?  By that I mean the desire to transition the city from a blue collar industrial (rail and shipping) economy to a white collar financial center type economy... of the Atlanta model for example.

By itself, the idea wasnt a bad one.

It was spurred by the fact that  Haydon Burns had an intuition about how a new florida exemption for the insurance and banking industry statute could be used.  Ed Ball and the porkchop gang had passed through the changes in order to give themselves fat tax loopholes in their various businesses, but in the process opened up florida to tax free, heavily subsidized insurance and bank relocations.

Burns was the first to recognize that the rest of the industry would be able to play under the same rules that Florida National Bank and Florida East Coast Rail insurers did.

He began marketing the city to those big industries.

Unfortunately then, as now, there was a small group of people who believed that you had to get rid of the 'blight' first.  which meant (as it does now) demolishing every structure that was being visibly used by 'the wrong set'---and utilizing the available land for parking.

stephendare

March 21, 2012, 10:13:35 AM

No matter how hard we might have tried to keep a working waterfront, it wouldn't have happened and today we'd probably be complaining as the city was in roughly 1960 that the whole dock, warehouse, waterfront complex is rotting and falling into the St. Johns River.

I agree that this was a much more 'human' time, and the downtown was blessed by it's location. However today it is simply impractical to think anyone would want this labor intensive method of shipping for nostalgia's sake. As we struggle with hundreds of empty lots stupidly left in the wake of hopeful investors or irresponsible owners, imagine how much more we would struggle had that shipping industry stayed downtown. Safe to say the whole area south of Union and north of the River would be a massive container lot. Downtown Jacksonville would be straddling the Trout River.

Keeping a few of the old docks in place would have been wise, provided there would have been a way to maintain them through those transition years. Today, interesting little 'import' shops, food vendors and perhaps our local crab boat industry could call them home. But in a downtown where fishing in OUR river is illegal, and roller skates are a capital crime, I wouldn't hold out much hope.


Ock, you raise great points about the state of the industry had we kept the industry downtown. 

But what would have happened if we had kept the passenger industry connection between rail and sea downtown?

What would you extrapolate would have happened?

How can we create the same kind of economic connetion and vibrancy using waterfront to rail connection today?

tufsu1

March 21, 2012, 10:21:55 AM
great article....can't wait for the book!

thelakelander

March 21, 2012, 10:24:03 AM
Quote
Keeping the old waterfront is a major theme of many of our articles, and while it would indeed be cool to have a 'working waterfront' today, it's just not possible, at least not in any historic sense.

Ock, I believe a working waterfront is possible but you can't get caught up on the ground level details of what the specific uses should be at this point.  I base that belief upon the successful transformation of similar districts in American cities all across the country (San Francisco, San Diego, etc. are good examples). 

While the waterfront of the past was port related and the area may not be suitable for container terminals, there's no reason a waterfront of the future can't offer more pleasure craft opportunities (think St. Petersburg or Miracle Mile) and be an environment that offers the possibility of small scale fishing, crabbing, charters, river cruises, etc. 

As for Commodore's Point, perhaps we should be trying to grow the remaining heavy maritime industries there instead of dreaming of ways to relocate them?  Perhaps some of the surface tailgate lots west of the Talleyrand should be repurposed for addition maritime related industry?  The river, rail, and expressway are already in place.  On the railroad front, while railyards won't be coming back, the terminal becoming an intermodal transportation hub would be a huge economic benefit.

ubben

March 21, 2012, 11:31:15 AM
Great article. And good points in the comment section about the nature of the shipping business. Yeah it sucks what we've lost, but a huge part of that is simple changing of the industry. We have a shallow, curvy river. The shipping had to move toward the ocean as the ships went to mammoth size. But can't we bring the rail depot back to downtown? That is something we can control.

BridgeTroll

March 21, 2012, 11:35:01 AM
What affect did the attempt to transform Jacksonville into "The Bold New City of the South" impact the destruction of this area?  By that I mean the desire to transition the city from a blue collar industrial (rail and shipping) economy to a white collar financial center type economy... of the Atlanta model for example.

By itself, the idea wasnt a bad one.

It was spurred by the fact that  Haydon Burns had an intuition about how a new florida exemption for the insurance and banking industry statute could be used.  Ed Ball and the porkchop gang had passed through the changes in order to give themselves fat tax loopholes in their various businesses, but in the process opened up florida to tax free, heavily subsidized insurance and bank relocations.

Burns was the first to recognize that the rest of the industry would be able to play under the same rules that Florida National Bank and Florida East Coast Rail insurers did.

He began marketing the city to those big industries.

Unfortunately then, as now, there was a small group of people who believed that you had to get rid of the 'blight' first.  which meant (as it does now) demolishing every structure that was being visibly used by 'the wrong set'---and utilizing the available land for parking.



While the idea may not have been a bad one it seems they put the cart before the horse.  Destroying rows of buildings in anticipation of shiny high rise office buildings filled with white collar office workers.  Of course getting rid of the blight used by the "wrong set" was a side "benefit".

simms3

March 21, 2012, 11:39:46 AM
What affect did the attempt to transform Jacksonville into "The Bold New City of the South" impact the destruction of this area?  By that I mean the desire to transition the city from a blue collar industrial (rail and shipping) economy to a white collar financial center type economy... of the Atlanta model for example.

The difference is in how the cities went about transforming their economic bases.  If you fly into Hartsfield and ride the train into the city, you will see old industrial communities and warehouses from an earlier era still standing for the whole 15 miles up.  Castleberry Hill is by no means the only remaining warehouse district and it is by far not the most successful.  There are brick stacks still remaining all over the city, and this holds true for Chattanooga, Nashville and Birmingham.

These cities did not view complete demolition and destruction as the way to transform their economies.  Sure they abandoned these older areas and their downtowns and developed the burbs, but compared to Jacksonville they largely left their inner areas intact.  Now, especially in Atlanta's and Nashville's case these inner areas are seeing a rebirth - and they aren't reverting back to their industrial uses.  They are becoming upscale office, residential and shopping districts catering to 21st century industries (tech, media, engineering, etc) and appealing to the creative classes, the wealthy and the educated.  Facebook has located their southeastern office to an old warehouse complex on the Westside called the Brickworks, and it is convenient to Georgia Tech and has other offices and plenty of restaurants and bars.  An old meatpacking plant that is rather large (120,000 SF and 4 floors) is something I get to work on, and now features upscale shopping and office tenants from Room & Board to Free People to Billy Reid to Calypso St. Barth and a 4 star restaurant, among others (as well as the most popular GT college bar - Ormsby's which is in the basement and has indoor Bocci Ball).

It will be next to impossible for Jacksonville to create these sort of atmospheres that attract and fuel young professional communities, universities, tech firms, etc etc.  It will be next to impossible for Jacksonville to get a good tourism industry going outside of the beach (and even the beaches aren't handled well imo).

Nashville is really an impressive city - moreso than Charlotte in my opinion, and it shows really well.  It has lofts and condos and density all over the place, much of it adaptive reuse.  It has all of its bars on 2 streets downtown (like Bay St times 25 at least).  It has tourism.  It has a cultural identity.  It has warehouses converted for 21st century uses.  It also has Vanderbilt which functions much like Georgia Tech and Emory do in terms of attracting top talent and top firms to the city.  The synergy going on results from many things, but one of the cornerstones is the infrastructure that has been preserved there and can now serve important uses.

Unfortunately Jacksonville went about its 20th century transformation a bit differently and will now have a more difficult time competing as a 21st century city where the past is a large part of the key to the future.

simms3

March 21, 2012, 11:43:24 AM
And might I mention especially considering that Atlanta has the second largest and seventh largest datacenters in the world - these are in prewar buildings.  One is downtown behind the old Macy's and just traded hands in one of the most publicized deals (the front/Macy's portion is now converted retail and event space, with bars fronting Peachtree).  One is on the Westside and is about 1 million sf.

Datacenters are taking over these old buildings.  They go to where there is a demand for datacenters, and where there is infrastructure for datacenters.  Jacksonville could have potentially capitalized on this had it kept its stock.

BridgeTroll

March 21, 2012, 11:46:06 AM
Quote
These cities did not view complete demolition and destruction as the way to transform their economies.  Sure they abandoned these older areas and their downtowns and developed the burbs, but compared to Jacksonville they largely left their inner areas intact.

I guess my question is why... Why did Jax decide to demolish a section of town rather than waiting for it's reuse possibilities?  My hypothesis is that they were in a hurry.  (and the whole undesirable thing...) Demolish now... ie... pave the way for future new construction.  Of course with hind sight we are witness to the fact that the desired redevelopment never occurred and we are left with open space...

stephendare

March 21, 2012, 11:56:38 AM
Quote
These cities did not view complete demolition and destruction as the way to transform their economies.  Sure they abandoned these older areas and their downtowns and developed the burbs, but compared to Jacksonville they largely left their inner areas intact.

I guess my question is why... Why did Jax decide to demolish a section of town rather than waiting for it's reuse possibilities?  My hypothesis is that they were in a hurry.  (and the whole undesirable thing...) Demolish now... ie... pave the way for future new construction.  Of course with hind sight we are witness to the fact that the desired redevelopment never occurred and we are left with open space...

You can see the literal exact same dynamic still at play in the present bridge troll.

Consider this insane rich to immediately demolish the courthouse and old city hall on the possibility that an as yet undesigned convention center might get the approval, and might find the funding to get built in a decade or so.

Or how about SPAR's campaign to demolish the old heart of Jacksonville hotel and all those pesky historic structures.

It defies common sense, yet the people who subscribe to this madness simply cannot be dissuaded in argument.

Unfortunately we have listened to this kind of bullshit for way too long. 

It is time we stopped.

Ocklawaha

March 21, 2012, 11:58:37 AM

No matter how hard we might have tried to keep a working waterfront, it wouldn't have happened and today we'd probably be complaining as the city was in roughly 1960 that the whole dock, warehouse, waterfront complex is rotting and falling into the St. Johns River.

I agree that this was a much more 'human' time, and the downtown was blessed by it's location. However today it is simply impractical to think anyone would want this labor intensive method of shipping for nostalgia's sake. As we struggle with hundreds of empty lots stupidly left in the wake of hopeful investors or irresponsible owners, imagine how much more we would struggle had that shipping industry stayed downtown. Safe to say the whole area south of Union and north of the River would be a massive container lot. Downtown Jacksonville would be straddling the Trout River.

Keeping a few of the old docks in place would have been wise, provided there would have been a way to maintain them through those transition years. Today, interesting little 'import' shops, food vendors and perhaps our local crab boat industry could call them home. But in a downtown where fishing in OUR river is illegal, and roller skates are a capital crime, I wouldn't hold out much hope.


Ock, you raise great points about the state of the industry had we kept the industry downtown. 

But what would have happened if we had kept the passenger industry connection between rail and sea downtown?

What would you extrapolate would have happened?

How can we create the same kind of economic connetion and vibrancy using waterfront to rail connection today?


Quote
Keeping the old waterfront is a major theme of many of our articles, and while it would indeed be cool to have a 'working waterfront' today, it's just not possible, at least not in any historic sense.

Ock, I believe a working waterfront is possible but you can't get caught up on the ground level details of what the specific uses should be at this point.  I base that belief upon the successful transformation of similar districts in American cities all across the country (San Francisco, San Diego, etc. are good examples). 

While the waterfront of the past was port related and the area may not be suitable for container terminals, there's no reason a waterfront of the future can't offer more pleasure craft opportunities (think St. Petersburg or Miracle Mile) and be an environment that offers the possibility of small scale fishing, crabbing, charters, river cruises, etc. 

As for Commodore's Point, perhaps we should be trying to grow the remaining heavy maritime industries there instead of dreaming of ways to relocate them?  Perhaps some of the surface tailgate lots west of the Talleyrand should be repurposed for addition maritime related industry?  The river, rail, and expressway are already in place.  On the railroad front, while railyards won't be coming back, the terminal becoming an intermodal transportation hub would be a huge economic benefit.

BINGO! I believe both Stephendare and Lakelander have hit on the crux of the situation as it might have/could have/should develop.

Today a working waterfront is the Inner Harbor in Baltimore, the cruise terminal in Norfolk, or the reinvented 'Pike' in Long Beach (though I'll always miss the old seedy one there too!) 

Had we preserved just a few of those buildings for the sake of future water related recreation, and small retail, fishing, charter business, it would be a magnet throughout the south today. The fact remains however that it couldn't be done for myriad reasons. One of the prime reasons was the 'new' Atlantic Coast Line Railroad Building in the late 1950's cut off the rail lines to anything east of that point (current CSX tower). Nobody could afford to sit on those sites until we moved from a production/industrial society, to a barren information age city. Having seen the waterfront in both era's the old one would never had made it to 1970 without massive infusions of cash and little hope for a ROI.

The 'Bold New City' concept was flawed in that it removed human space for automobile space. Tearing down the waterfront as bad as it was and replacing the most valuable land in Florida (at that time) with a massive parking lot speaks volumes to a lack of vision. Sure we snagged a few big dog banks and insurance companies, and perhaps hung on to some retail for a bit longer, but the age of the consolidation of industry blew right past us. Meanwhile we jealously guarded our riverfront parking lots!

Godbold's Jacksonville Landing concept I believe was largely based on recovering some of what we once had, but the scale of the place, lack of a fixed transit connection, broken parking replacement promises, horrible maintenance, and very limited river or street interaction have given us another 'tumbling wharf on the waterfront'. Albeit one that COULD be fixed.

I think Stephen is on to a cutting edge idea that we could explore further and push toward reality. There would be some major obstacles to overcome and timing of each element as it came on line would be critical.

Getting Amtrak and the intercity bus companies back into a single downtown station building would help.

A streetcar connection between that historic station, punching all the way through the historic downtown core, to the Hyatt, Newnan, Beaver, Stadium, Gateway, would also kick start the movement of people through the core again.

Lakelander's concept of turning the landing and Wells Fargo building's retail inside-out to face the street would work. The addition of a historic element missing from most such remakes is the broad awnings which once protected downtown's citizens from the blazing summer heat or rain.

A vigorous recruitment of small cruise lines:
http://blountsmallshipadventures.com/where-we-go/2012-atlantic-coastal-waterways?view=itinerary
http://www.americancruiselines.com/Search?r=Southeast%20US&d=By%20Departure%20Date&s=By%20Ship
http://www.pearlseascruises.com/  (Under Development to our area)
http://www.smallshipcruises.com/cruisereport/cruisereportradissonsevenseas.shtml (Currently serving Tampa-Gulf area)

Roundtable discussions between Jaxport Cruise Executives - Disney - Amtrak - Port of Sanford - Greyhound Charters - JIA and the small ship operators could create a thriving market with a connectivity unlike any in the country. It could also revive the St. Johns River as a regular cruise route.

Development of a multipurpose Florida Marine Welcome Center - Visit Jacksonville - Small Cruise Terminal - with more retail along the waterfront could be the dynamo that gives it the needed attractiveness to the various private carriers and theme parks. 

Using Stephens premise, there is no reason why Amtrak couldn't run into downtown with regularly scheduled trains carrying cruise passengers. No reason why we can't market the southeast, Disney and all the rest, right from our waterfront.

We need more interaction between the water and the city, even at the landing it is very restricted. We also need to lighten up on our social laws that prevent an executive from seeing a fisherman or skater while enjoying a lunch on the bulkhead. How many muggers wear skates?



What affect did the attempt to transform Jacksonville into "The Bold New City of the South" impact the destruction of this area?  By that I mean the desire to transition the city from a blue collar industrial (rail and shipping) economy to a white collar financial center type economy... of the Atlanta model for example.

I think the sell out that this city started in 1932-36 to the automobile industry and completed by replacing entire districts of human activity with more space for automobiles is at the heart if not THE heart of the matter. A little wisdom from south of the border, quoting the mayor of Bogota, "roads move automobiles - fixed transit moves people."

thelakelander

March 21, 2012, 12:05:54 PM
Ock, I know your post regarding preservation focuses moreso on the waterfront but I don't see why Railroad Row (specifically the area bounded by Water/Bay, I-95, Adams, and Clay) absolutely "had" to be leveled.  Also, in regards to working waterfronts, I believe the Shipyards and JEA sites offer a ton of opportunity for a variety of uses.

stephendare

March 21, 2012, 12:13:44 PM
Ock, I know your post regarding preservation focuses moreso on the waterfront but I don't see why Railroad Row (specifically the area bounded by Water/Bay, I-95, Adams, and Clay) absolutely "had" to be leveled.  Also, in regards to working waterfronts, I believe the Shipyards and JEA sites offer a ton of opportunity for a variety of uses.

+1

Ock I know you have spent a lot of time thinking about this, please share some of your ideas about how to restore the vibrancy of the waterfront rail connection!

Simms, you are 100% correct that the problem lay in how we dealt with these issues.  I saw a lot of examples of both kinds of mentality I my travels through the small cities of the Midwest.

Muncie and Anderson both demolished their own heritages to make way for "progress" and we're subsequently left with neither.  Cities like Richmond and others built modern industrial corporate centers on the fringes of their cities and today they are in possession of both.

simms3

March 21, 2012, 12:25:12 PM
Well to be frank the City Hall Annex and the "old" courthouse replaced buildings that really could have benefited us now and are frankly irreplaceable.  In my opinion, to me the Annex and Courthouse are replaceable by anything.  They offer no architectural redemption, and they can't be retrofitted to benefit street level activity.  Office users aren't going to want those buildings - they are class C at best without much window space.  There is literally no other use for them.  In fact, I would rather see surface parking on those sites than what we have now.  The comparison of the attitude of demolishing truly irreplaceable structures/infrastructure to demolishing precisely what we are revolving this whole discussion around (i.e. 60s transformative modernism) is moot.  One demolition (the demolition to make way for the hulking ugly structures we have now) was a bad decision.  One demolition would only be a bad decision financially if we have no better use replacement, but would not impact the city in any which way.

To demolish the "old" courthouse for a convention center that will benefit the city and the surrounding environ is not the same as demolishing an entire city's industrial base, half of its neighborhoods, its cultural heart, and much of its basic infrastructure.  No comparison - bad comparison.

Ocklawaha

March 21, 2012, 12:30:05 PM
Ock, I know your post regarding preservation focuses moreso on the waterfront but I don't see why Railroad Row (specifically the area bounded by Water/Bay, I-95, Adams, and Clay) absolutely "had" to be leveled.  Also, in regards to working waterfronts, I believe the Shipyards and JEA sites offer a ton of opportunity for a variety of uses.

Perhaps our greatest loss was the Atlantic and East Coast Terminal Building, it was ugly, weird, and freaking huge! Whoever came up with the idea to knock this down should be flogged and tossed in a pasture in front of a raging armadillo stampede.

You and I are in complete agreement on all of the above points, and yes, I was pretty much limiting myself to the water-rail interaction and why it HAD to change. But there is not a reason in the world why the entire district along with LaVilla and Fairfield had to be leveled.

Missing from all of our posts is the loss of the BEAUTIFUL Lee Street Viaduct, which in spite of 'valid' reasons that were found to rip it down, was actually the victim of the Convention Center boys wanting a view into downtown from the front door straight down Water Street.

I would disagree with Simms on the point that we have surrendered our city to 'better places'. We took a different approach, for better or worse, but as Lakelander pointed out, there is plenty of room to fix the errs.

aclchampion

March 21, 2012, 01:45:42 PM
Absolutely fan-damn-tastic article!

Marley Weinstein

March 21, 2012, 03:52:03 PM
Great Article!

mtraininjax

March 22, 2012, 03:29:20 PM
Fantastic work, Jerry Spinks would have been in awe, as much as I am!

Ocklawaha

March 24, 2012, 10:57:14 PM
Ock, I know your post regarding preservation focuses moreso on the waterfront but I don't see why Railroad Row (specifically the area bounded by Water/Bay, I-95, Adams, and Clay) absolutely "had" to be leveled.  Also, in regards to working waterfronts, I believe the Shipyards and JEA sites offer a ton of opportunity for a variety of uses.

Neither do I lake, the leveling of LaVilla, Brooklyn and Fairfield were complete shocks to me when I got back from Colombia. The wholesale butchery of these districts plus most of Davis and 'Florida Avenue' aka: A.P. Randolph, borders on criminal negligence. Actually West Bay Street was not only historical, it was also quite interesting through the 1980's. It might have gone artistic, and trendy, the bones of those streets were an excellent collection of decorative brick, early hotel, bordello and industrial architecture. Many a railroader paid for their women by the hour over on Houston Street.

Wasn't this more of Jack Dynamite's handiwork?


Good ole southern conservative leadership...dontcha just love it?

You know Garden Guy, I don't know how smart we are, but I've never seen a Southron pay $25 dollars to see some damn fool wrestle an alligator.

MajorCordite

June 23, 2012, 06:37:49 PM
Absolutely a magnificent article.   And excellent comments too, I might add.   

However, as a former Jax resident (1960 - 1981) I feel depressed when I see these pictures and read the commentary.  May dad and grandfather worked for the Atlantic Coast Line Railroad and I spent a lot of my early years in and around Union Station.  We frequently ate in the old hotel coffee shops, had breakfast or lunch in the dinners in and around this area.   On Saturdays you could get a haircut on East Bay Street, at Crowd's Barber Shop, plunder through The Army Surplus Shop next door, walk west stopping at a juice stand and watch a guy smash coconuts and get fresh coconut milk. 

Sometimes we would have lunch at this Chinese Restaurant over on Hogan Street and my dad would take me to this little curio shop, which you got to by walking down some steps slightly below street level.   In 1963, I bought a little magnetic mummy in a coffin magic trick which I still have.  Occasionally he would drop me off at the Florida theater and I would watch a matinee.  Looking back, I now realize I was not experiencing Jacksonville in its heyday but I was passing through a time that was about to end.  As I have said before, it is sort of like visiting your elderly grandparents and you suddenly realize that they will only be around for a short while longer.

In 1968, at age 15, I rode the train by myself from Grand Central Station, NY, the day after Christmas, to Union Station.   I walked all the way from Union Station to Hemming Park with one tattered suitcase and caught a bus, 21C to Arlington. (.25 cents)  It took me directly to my front door.  So, maybe I was living in Jacksonville in its prime.   You certainly can't move around the city and the suburbs like that today.   Thanks for the memories!

     

Johnny Hall

August 10, 2012, 09:38:11 AM
hi there , im so happy to find this site , brings back so much to me now. i remember mr. ashton the barber there in the terminal and the watch shop too but not the nice mans name. my mother worked for mrs. cubie glover at the sundries store across from the station. my father john l. hall jr. had a business on bay st. called needham and hall plumbing plus he had some if not all interest in the st. charles hotel. i do also remember that it did burn down sometime in the 60's and the fire dept. used water from mccoys creek to put out the fire. that was about the time we moved from post st. out to collins rd. (west side) and opened the halls poultry farm. the last time i saw the union terminal was back in the 80's when ramses  the king exibit was touring and set up there. i hung the banners out front on the massive colums of the terminal. jacksonville screwed itself is exactly how i feel too. i do thank you for the memories though.

i do miss those old buildings because i was in and out of many of them during the day while my mother and father worked on bay st. she paid a railroad hobo ervin brown to watch me. mom would have hurt him if she knew where all we went during the day. i remember being really close to both steam and diesel train engines and even inside one on a few occasions. im very sure its why im a rail fan to this day.

i had a strokeback in dec. 2011 and forgot a bunch of this until finding this site. so thank you webmaster and contributors. most sincerely johnny hall

 
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