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Bike Sharing in Urban Jacksonville?

To combat traffic congestion for an affordable cost, Miami Beach is betting big on an overlooked form of transit: bike sharing. Could such a program work in walkable areas of Jacksonville?

Published January 14, 2011 in Transit      18 Comments    Open printer friendly version of this article Print Article



Image source: Floridabicycle.org


Bike Sharing in Miami Beach

Following the successful examples of Barcelona, Montreal and Paris, Miami Beach is in the process of building one of America's most extensive bicycle-sharing programs.

Set up as a public/private partnership with DecoBike, the city will provide the sidewalk and street space for stations, while DecoBike will foot the bill for 1,000 bicycles and 100 self-service stations. Profits generated by memberships, rentals and advertising will be split between the city and DecoBike.


Quote
The fee structure is designed to encourage short trips for transportation. A $15 monthly membership, available online, covers an unlimited number of rentals. The first 30 minutes of any rental -- usually enough to reach a destination -- are free. After that, the fee can reach $6 an hour, depending on total time. Short-term rentals and discounted passes are available for visitors.

The concept is that users would check out a bike to get from home to, say, the bank or the store, where they return it at a DecoBike rack. Then they would check out another bike to head for home or their next destination.

"The idea is to get you from station to station, so that you never have to lock up the bike on your own time,'' Reese said.
http://www.miamiherald.com/2010/12/31/1996001_p2/pedal-power-to-help-with-beach.html

In addition to bike sharing, the City of Miami Beach is also in the process of instituting an interconnected network of on-street bike lanes and designated bikeways to improve safety and convenience.  While Jacksonville isn't as dense or congested as Miami Beach, could a smaller sized bike share program be viable in certain areas of Jacksonville?







18 Comments

dougskiles

January 14, 2011, 05:31:02 AM
This would be near utopia for me - and maybe a few others?  People really seem to love their cars around here.

Hopefully that will change when we give people viable alternatives (bike lanes, transit systems) that begin where people live and end where they work and play.

Now as to the question of where it would work best?  As much as I love downtown and our urban neighborhoods, I think the bike sharing would work much better at our beach communities.

dougskiles

January 14, 2011, 07:22:31 AM
One more place comes to mind - the St Johns Town Center.  Very spread out & walkable.

Speaking of the Town Center - I am interested in knowing what the average distance walked from car to store is - if anyone has that statistic, please post or email to me.  Thanks.

uptowngirl

January 14, 2011, 07:26:24 AM
Downtown and the Urban core already have a bike sharing program of sorts (OK maybe not that funny!), But this is an awesome idea and I would agree SJTC, Beaches, are both great places for this.

dougskiles

January 14, 2011, 08:27:41 AM
You are correct - and the repository seems to be Hogan's Creek.

Non-RedNeck Westsider

January 14, 2011, 08:47:00 AM
One more place comes to mind - the St Johns Town Center.  Very spread out & walkable.

Speaking of the Town Center - I am interested in knowing what the average distance walked from car to store is - if anyone has that statistic, please post or email to me.  Thanks.

Not feasible.  You have to drive to get there, so you're prob. not going to ditch your car for a rent-a-bike.  How is the typical soccer mom with 2 kids in tow going to do her shopping with everyone on a bike.

There isn't any average distance.  Park in front of DSW or Target or drive around until you find a spot curbside.  This 'walkable' town center is very much designed for cars, albeit poorly.

Captain Zissou

January 14, 2011, 09:10:53 AM
Do the bikes have to be so ugly??

I agree that the beach is better laid out for something like this, but everyone at the beach already has a bike.  It's part of their wardrobe.  I'd love to see this instituted downtown and in the core.  Avondale is best laid out for it, San Marco's ok, but going between the two could be difficult.  I'm not sure how much of an issue crossing the bridge is.

fieldafm

January 14, 2011, 09:34:10 AM
Quote
While Jacksonville isn't as dense or congested as Miami Beach, could a smaller sized bike share program be viable in certain areas of Jacksonville?


Several bike shops at the beach now have bike rentals.  It could definately work, but like you said it would have to be limited to dense areas... I can only really see the beaches and Riverside/Avondale being viable.  That being said, Riverside/Avondale is prime right now for a more bike friendly transformation.  Dedicated bike lanes is something the newest City Council member(whoever that may be come March) for this district needs to focus on.

Quote
You are correct - and the repository seems to be Hogan's Creek.

At the SCAD/Shipyards project, one group(whom I liked the best) had integrated a bike rental station along the Hogans Creek Greenway their shipyards master plan called for.  It was one of the five reasons I liked their ideas so much.

urbaknight

January 14, 2011, 11:37:13 AM
I've ridden across the main st bridge on my bike many times. It's a great workout. The Acosta bridge is much more difficult to bike on.

There needs to be more bikeracks DT, like the one in front of the arts museum next to the library. That would at least show people that they have a place to lock up their bikes.

cephus

January 14, 2011, 01:24:38 PM
I'm all for it:  Riverside, San marco, Beaches.  heck, I'd do it at Topwn Center because I HATE the parking mess and sprawl.  If only it could have been developed like the Grove in LA, which has a streetcar for crying out loud.  www.thegrovela.com 

peestandingup

January 14, 2011, 01:42:12 PM
The problem as I see it is density & transportation tying our neighborhoods together. The areas/cities that this works in are HIGHLY condensed where people/bikers are able to move around easily from one neighborhood to another. So you could say, rent a bike in Avondale to take over to San Marco or up to Springfield, then be able to drop off the bike there & take public transportation back home. Jax doesn't have that type of setup at all. Even the "core" here is spread out. Meaning you simply cannot easily get to each of our urban areas without a car. You could probably string something together, but it would be a PITA & defeat the purpose.

So the sad reality is, until we get better connectivity & better public trans, this isn't going to be an option for us. People will just opt to stay in their cars unless you're able to take them out of the equation completely.

fieldafm

January 14, 2011, 01:48:46 PM
Honestly, I bike a lot in b/w the core and the urban neighborhoods.  Even with the no man's land seperating downtown with the neighboring core hoods, I still bike less miles than I would if I went from the Jax Beach Town Center to the Neptune/Atlantic Beach Town Centers.  The difference is the infill/density in b/w the two beach hubs, not the distance.

north miami

January 14, 2011, 03:35:01 PM
Saw the very same in Paris last month (including the funky looking bikes...) The emphasis in Paris is on use by tourist.

Anything bike-able a plus.

As rowdy as our weather here may exhibit at times fact is we are a masterful ideal location for cycling.

Noone

January 14, 2011, 08:15:14 PM
This is a single for Bay Street Pier Park. It can happen. Another lob pitch for the District 4 city councilman. During the St. Johns River Summit in Sept. One of the speakers on Locally Resourceful Tourism for a sustainable River economy was Herb Hiller. An avid cyclist. I spoke to Herb about this.

Herb came to Jacksonville and just think of the easy potential to connect neighborhoods. A pocket pier at Holmesdale ave. and a bicycle rack. Bike to Mudville Grille and the St. Nicholas business district. Reverse it. Take a boat over to Bay St. Pier Park and then grab a bike on Bay Street Pier Park. You have just connected both sides of the St. Johns River. Is this organic growth?

blandman

January 14, 2011, 11:01:48 PM
Saw the very same in Paris last month (including the funky looking bikes...) The emphasis in Paris is on use by tourist.

I don't think this system was designed for tourists.  Tourists (like myself!) can enjoy a ride, but it works best for residents who have yearly memberships, which makes picking up and dropping off a bike extremely fast (just punch in a code...no credit card required).

Noone

January 15, 2011, 07:00:43 AM
Have it for both. Allow it to grow organically. The market will show where the market is headed.

Springfielder

January 15, 2011, 08:21:10 AM
I like the concept, the problem is that for the most part, Jacksonville really isn't bike friendly.

On the same kind of concept, especially in cities where there's more density, (including their downtown) there's also a car sharing company that works extremely well. It's great for those who don't own one, who live in heavily populated areas/neighborhoods and can rent one of the cars.

ricker

January 17, 2011, 12:47:15 AM
This is a single for Bay Street Pier Park. It can happen. Another lob pitch for the District 4 city councilman. During the St. Johns River Summit in Sept. One of the speakers on Locally Resourceful Tourism for a sustainable River economy was Herb Hiller. An avid cyclist. I spoke to Herb about this.

Herb came to Jacksonville and just think of the easy potential to connect neighborhoods. A pocket pier at Holmesdale ave. and a bicycle rack. Bike to Mudville Grille and the St. Nicholas business district. Reverse it. Take a boat over to Bay St. Pier Park and then grab a bike on Bay Street Pier Park. You have just connected both sides of the St. Johns River. Is this organic growth?

AWESOME!

Noone

January 17, 2011, 01:24:35 AM
Ricker,
The same thing can happen in the JMM Jacksonville Marina Mile. Is that whats trying to be created on the westside? First thing is to find out who is the councilman. We are 60 days out from an election and this forum is OK but if you want to make it happen then talk to the candidates that are running for office. 630-1377

The transient vendor ban 2010-856. How about bicycle vendors? Maybe there aren't any now. But think of this example. And it could happen anywhere in Jacksonville. Kayak to a location under the 17 bridge that your talking about. If all you want to do is kayak that is fine. But if you want to continue on there is a bicycle rack. You leave your kayaks there and now you get on the bikes and bike to that restaurant which would be the end of your trip. Restaurants will now want to have a bicycle rack. Maybe there is something like this in San Marco already. Just asking. Is this organic?

So who wants to kayak Hogans Creek and McCoys Creek? We won't talk about it we'll do it. Elected officials and those running in the spring elections go to the front of the line. 
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