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Lost Church, Lost Battlefield, Lost Cemetery, Lost War

The story of the loss and rediscovery by the Metro Jacksonville team, of Brick Church, and its Battlefield, and Cemetery from the long ago Civil War. Discovered not 500 feet from I-95, in Downtown Jacksonville.

Published March 1, 2010 in History      105 Comments    Open printer friendly version of this article Print Article


feature



During the Civil War, one of many small battles around Jacksonville took place at "The Brick Church."  While the battle was certainly small in numbers it involved a number of military firsts.

Following the secession of the State of Florida on January 10, 1861, Lincoln began to assemble a massive amphibious naval armada in the Chesapeake Bay.

The companies forming the First Florida cavalry commanded by Col. G. W. M. Davis, spent several months in training at "Camp Davis," six miles from Tallahassee. The 1St Florida was interracial White, Latino and Black, with many Spanish speakers within the ranks. When they were assigned to the Army of Tennessee, they honored our state with intrepid gallantry at Richmond, Perryville, Chickamauga, and Missionary Ridge. After the abandonment of Florida's coastal defenses in early 1862, several warships of the Federal Navy passed the bar and headed up the St. Johns River. Fierce cannonade followed as they attempted to run past St. Johns Bluff and Yellow Bluff Forts, and several gunboats were seriously enough damaged to be forced to return to the fleet base. St. Johns Bluff fell to a 1,200 man invasion force that made an overland (salt marsh) trek from Mount Pleasant Plantation to the Confederate batteries, sadly indefensible from a land approach.


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105 Comments

sheclown

March 01, 2010, 07:24:14 AM
Has MJ contacted Joel's office about this?

What a wonderful find.  I am amazed.

fsu813

March 01, 2010, 07:52:15 AM
curious as to why no sources or citations are referenced.

hard to tell what was lost, what's a new discovery, and what's been known....

sheclown

March 01, 2010, 08:02:36 AM
well...if it is known, it sure isn't treasured...why wouldn't a city set aside a site as significant as this?

Jason

March 01, 2010, 08:36:19 AM
Wow.  What an amazing story!

I can't wait to see what may become of this descovery.

Dan B

March 01, 2010, 08:38:35 AM
This was during the first occupation of Jacksonville in 1862?

Interesting stuff. I do wish that there was some sort of tag on the photo so we knew what we were looking at.

Another interesting civil war site in jax is Yellow Bluff. It was held for a time by the famous Mass 54th.

Another thing I would be interested to find out, are there any remnants of the fortifications that the ACoE started to build around the city in 1864ish?

jandar

March 01, 2010, 09:03:10 AM
This city has had issues with historical sites. Nothing new.

This site though should be saved.

samiam

March 01, 2010, 10:17:45 AM
This city has had issues with historical sites. Nothing new.

This site though should be saved.

I agree 100%. As I have said before on here. There has to be a massive amount of lost civil war history in Jacksonville. I have found 3 ring civil war era bullets in Riverside, Downtown and Springfield. If that's not evidence of civil war activity I don't know what is.



Ocklawaha

March 01, 2010, 10:30:16 AM
curious as to why no sources or citations are referenced.

hard to tell what was lost, what's a new discovery, and what's been known....


The battlefield itself, the church and the war were all lost to anyone living today. Apparently there has never been any effort to preserve any of the above, perhaps because the participants returning from such hell holes as Gettysburg, Atlanta or Kennesaw later in the war, had a hard time even considering such an action a battle.

As for historical citations, as with anything you will see me write on the war, everything is taken straight from the "Official Records of the War of The Rebellion, both the Army and Naval series."  JU has a complete set available for public use, the downtown library also has some of the records.

The books are arranged by state or territory, and then by year and month. Each is at least as big as a family Bible, and there are well over 100 volumes... so enjoy!


OCKLAWAHA

BridgeTroll

March 01, 2010, 10:38:25 AM
Quote
I have found 3 ring civil war era bullets in Riverside, Downtown and Springfield.

If they look like this...  They are called a Minie ball

samiam

March 01, 2010, 10:39:15 AM
I have heard rumors that there was a civil war POW camp and a fort over in Riverside. I think the fort was were the YMCA is now.

samiam

March 01, 2010, 10:42:02 AM
Quote
I have found 3 ring civil war era bullets in Riverside, Downtown and Springfield.

If they look like this... They are called a Minnie ball



Yep


I called them bullets because every one knows what a bullet is. They are 58 cal. Big hunks of lead. I also found a clay pipe and some Indian pottery shards in the same area.

Dog Walker

March 01, 2010, 11:02:48 AM
Why post the picture of the recent dog skeleton?

Cliffs_Daughter

March 01, 2010, 11:04:29 AM
Quote
Fight at the "Brick Church." On March 17 the Union artillery commenced a cross fire from their intrenchments upon a portion of Major Brevard's battalion at the "Brick Church." The Confederates held their position for about two hours, when the Federals appeared in force. A sharp engagement followed, and the Federals were driven back.
http://fcit.usf.edu/FLORIDA/docs/c/civatjax.htm

samiam

March 01, 2010, 11:06:36 AM
Why post the picture of the recent dog skeleton?
That's what I thought, Then I thought, I guess someone is using it as a pet cemetery  ???

heights unknown

March 01, 2010, 11:26:05 AM
Was that a dead dog, animal, human or what?

"HU"

Dog Walker

March 01, 2010, 11:29:01 AM
Dog.  Short muzzled breed of some sort.  Pit bull, Rottweiler, Boxer?

Ocklawaha

March 01, 2010, 11:51:49 AM
I think the animal was posted with the story to demonstrate the extent of our disregard for historical sites?


This is a photo of one of the proud Confederate Soldiers of the 1St Florida Regiment.
Kind of messes with what your history teacher told you doesn't it?



OCKLAWAHA

Coolyfett

March 01, 2010, 12:35:07 PM
When it comes to wars in Jacksonville the one that comes up is the French & Spanish fights at Fort Caroline & St. Augustine.....Ive never heard of any of this civil war coverage. Interesting.

Dan B

March 01, 2010, 12:42:14 PM
^ the union occupied Jax 4 times in 5 years.

In some of the reading I have conducted, I came away with the feeling Jax wasn't quite as die hard Confederate as some would have you believe. Perhaps not quite as Unionist as Eastern Tennessee, but not quite as Confederate as our neighbors to the north.

James

March 01, 2010, 01:28:12 PM
What was the last picture before the story up at the top?  Where did that come from?

Ocklawaha

March 01, 2010, 01:38:44 PM
Apparently remains of an old farm, the houses just to the north were shotgun homes typical of LaVilla/Durkeeville. Probably circa 1900-60. The trees rival treaty oak, and form a rough square around the old church property.

OCKLAWAHA

JaxNative68

March 01, 2010, 03:33:56 PM
it is amazing how jacksonville can ignore and pave over its history

billy

March 01, 2010, 05:13:58 PM
Is this City owned?
I have been looking at the GIS maps on coj.net trying to find out?
What is the exact address?

Thanks.

devlinmann

March 01, 2010, 05:23:13 PM
Please tell me this site will be preserved and cared for!

Dan B

March 01, 2010, 05:36:28 PM
Here is the map from 1864 that shows the fortifications (planned, or built, not sure). I would love to see a full size version of this.




Dan B

March 01, 2010, 05:41:42 PM
Here is a better look


OCK, it Looks like there is a "Ft Hatch" in the vicinity of the battle area. It might be "Ft Haleh". Cant really tell.

stephendare

March 01, 2010, 05:47:37 PM
The story behind the discovery of the site is pretty interesting as well.

The lost maps were crucial to both its location as well as even basic knowledge of its existence.

I will post an elaboration of its discovery a little later this week.

deathstar

March 01, 2010, 06:19:42 PM
Is it alright to walk on that property? Did you need permission from someone? I'd like to take a trip there sometime this week for sure and check it out, my Dad is a HUGE Civil War buff.

billy

March 01, 2010, 07:33:01 PM
cool stuff

riverside_mail

March 01, 2010, 08:10:29 PM
Dog.  Short muzzled breed of some sort.  Pit bull, Rottweiler, Boxer?

Most likely pit bull. There were quite a few running around the shotgun houses on Duval St. when they were still occupied. As for the land's recent use, the lot between Monroe and Adams used to be used for storing a couple of old tree service trucks. The lot between Monroe and Duval used to be used by an old man who collected junk. It had a board fence around it for the longest time and used have a sign proclaiming "Firewood for sale."

Dan B

March 01, 2010, 08:47:09 PM
Ock. I Just matched up the 1864 map with a modern day map. That "Ft Hatch or "Ft Haleh" is actually not that far off of your location. A couple of blocks at most, and the maps is not perfectly laid out (hand drawn, vs Satellite imagery) What are the chances your church was used as a fortification when the Union Army build the wall?

Ocklawaha

March 01, 2010, 08:49:15 PM
Dog.  Short muzzled breed of some sort.  Pit bull, Rottweiler, Boxer?

Most likely pit bull. There were quite a few running around the shotgun houses on Duval St. when they were still occupied. As for the land's recent use, the lot between Monroe and Adams used to be used for storing a couple of old tree service trucks. The lot between Monroe and Duval used to be used by an old man who collected junk. It had a board fence around it for the longest time and used have a sign proclaiming "Firewood for sale."

It was in fact, a pit bull.

riverside_mail

March 01, 2010, 08:51:46 PM
Here is some more info I have dug up concerning the Brick Church.

The first is from the memoirs of a veteran of Abell's Artillery. Note the mention of Whitehouse and a man named Pickett, whom I assume Pickettville is named for.

"Our battery supported by some six hundred men both Infantry and cavalry were one morning instructed to retake the place. The battery was stationed at and near the old Brick Church we succeeded after stubborn fighting in running the Yankees to their boats. The infantry did some hard work our guns used a good deal of ammunition three of our men were killed and several wounded the Infantry lost about seventy five killed & wounded. We only held the town about ten days as the sequel will show. The company returned to the "White House" and remained in camp. A very unfortunate affair occurred here in which we lost a promising officer Lieutenant. He was boarding at a house kept by Pickett and had a room upstairs. Early in the morning Pickett going from room to room making fires found the Lieutenant in his wifes bed and he was shot and killed although defending himself with a chair."

The second is from a history of the 2nd Florida regiment.

"In the early days of June these ten companies were ordered to rendezvous near the Brick Church, just west of Jacksonville, now known as LaVilla, and on July 13 the Regiment was mustered into Confederate service by Major W. T. Stockton."

The third is from the Orlando Sentinel and describes the ties between the Brick Church and the assassination plot of Abraham Lincoln.

"On this day in 1861, a Floridian began a journey to infamy.

At the Old Brick Church on the west side of Jacksonville on July 13, 1861, 10 Florida infantry units assembled to become the 2nd Florida Infantry Regiment. The churchyard had become Camp Virginia.

The Florida Historical Society records the units mustering into Confederate service on that day as the Alachua Guards, Leon Rifles, Columbia Guards, Hammock Guards (from Marion County), Gulf State Guards of Jackson County, St. Johns Greys, St. Augustine Rifles, Davis Guards of Nassau County, the Madison Rangers and the Hamilton Blues.

Among the recruits of the Hamilton Blues was Lewis Thornton Powell, who had signed up at the Hamilton County town of Jasper. His parents' farm was just to the south at Live Oak.

As a boy, he had picked up the nickname "Doc" because he enjoyed taking care of sick and stray animals.

He was 12 when a pet mule kicked him in the face, fracturing his jaw. When his face healed, the injury left him with distinctive lump on the left side of his chin.

Military records list his age at enlistment as 19, but he was really 17.

Nearly four years to the day after he enlisted in Florida, Powell was executed for his role in the conspiracy to assassinate President Abraham Lincoln and other high-ranking leaders. On July 7, 1865, Powell and three other conspirators were hanged in Washington.

Powell, the lone Floridian to join John Wilkes Booth's plot, is buried in Geneva, a small northeast Seminole County community on Lake Harney.

Another of the soldiers of the Hamilton Blues who signed up on the same day as Powell, William Slade is buried at a small private cemetery along Pleasant Hill Road south of Kissimmee.

Research by the Geneva Historical & Genealogical Society found that Powell, Slade and the others in the Florida infantry marched north.

On July 2, 1863, Powell was shot in his right wrist during the Battle of Gettysburg and captured. Slade, too, was wounded in that battle.

The war would take them along different journeys after Gettysburg.

Slade recovered from wounds, only to be shot again and captured during fighting at Spotsylvania, Va. He would spend the rest of the war under horrible conditions at the Union prison for enlisted men at Elmira, N.Y.

The food was sparse and often rotten. Few prisoners had blankets. Buildings were too small for the 10,000 prisoners, so about half were held in tents, even during the hard winter. The death rate was 500 prisoners a month."

Dan B

March 01, 2010, 09:26:24 PM
It also looks like there were two engagements at Brick Church.

March 25th, and again on May 3, 1862.

Maybe even a third engagement in 1863? It may have been a typo. This battle was by "Major Brevard's battalion"

mtraininjax

March 01, 2010, 10:04:52 PM
Until Joel and his group come out and it gets its press in the TU, I consider it some nice color pictures.

stephendare

March 01, 2010, 10:32:54 PM
Until Joel and his group come out and it gets its press in the TU, I consider it some nice color pictures.

lol.

thats hilarious.  The Times Union wishes they had a scoop like this.

I suppose we should probably let Joel know though.   But we are pretty stoked to have the first mention of it here on MetroJacksonville.

And this is only the first of some pretty startling historical discoveries that we will be announcing incidentally.

The next few months we will be releasing a series of articles and photo essays that provide what is essentially a forgotten history of the city.

The exact position of the graveyard, for example, is not listed or known about in the modern age, except as a reference to the Brick Church-----pieced together by Ock.

Even the existence of the cemetary itself is mostly unknown.

What makes the discovery more important is that the map from which it came was drawn in 1850, and the  graveyard clearly existed prior to the land platting at that time (look at how oddly it sits on the properties)

We know for example that when Hart and the boys replatted the city streets (notice the use of 're' platting,) in the 1820s there was already an established and settled area large enough to have its own graveyard.

samiam

March 01, 2010, 10:38:03 PM
There is an old brick church listed here. Im not sure if it the same

http://archiver.rootsweb.ancestry.com/th/read/FL-NE-CEMETERY/2001-06/0991947282

Fallen Buckeye

March 01, 2010, 10:50:23 PM
There's a plaque on Lennox Ave. by Cedar Creek that tells about about a little Civil War battle that happened all over a good chunk of the west side. From what the sign it started in Olustee and carried over into Jacksonville at Cedar Creek and McCoy Creek. It would be neat if some of these other sites were marked too. How much could a plaque be? Maybe a couple thousand tops?

samiam

March 01, 2010, 10:52:28 PM
I think this is who needs to be contacted

http://www.flheritage.com/preservation/markers/

stephendare

March 01, 2010, 11:19:21 PM
In the map below, "Spring Street" is Monroe Street in the modern era.

You can see the cemetary listed at the far left hand side of the Map, near the corner of what is Myrtle Street today.

riverside_mail

March 01, 2010, 11:41:10 PM
There is an old brick church listed here. Im not sure if it the same

http://archiver.rootsweb.ancestry.com/th/read/FL-NE-CEMETERY/2001-06/0991947282

it is the very same one.

stephendare

March 01, 2010, 11:58:20 PM
It is the same one, Sam.  Good find!

Now we know where the cemetary was that went with the church.  We should contact these people.

samiam

March 02, 2010, 12:01:15 AM
Are there any building currently on the cemetery now ?

stephendare

March 02, 2010, 12:07:31 AM
Are there any building currently on the cemetery now ?

Only the ones in the photos

A row of shotgun houses was built over the northern half, and the bizarre pen thats on the property, but nothing on the south end of the field. (where we discovered the old tomb stones.

In answer to the question can you walk around on the property.

Old Monroe Street runs right through the middle of it, and you can park and get out.

The Oaks are breathtaking. 

The largest one is 20 feet in circumference---The Treaty Oak, for example is 25 feet---.  Sadly the old oak in the middle of the burial ground is dying.  One half of the tree is already dead and dried.  No one lives on the property at all, and its kind of thrilling to come across this graveyard which is centuries old right in the middle of the downtown.  The old perimeter of the graveyard is ringed with the old oaks.

Very beautiful southern gothic.

stephendare

March 02, 2010, 12:29:43 AM
Thanks Samiam for sending the following transcription!

This pretty much gives a great story about the events surrounding the Brick Church!

Where did you find it?!?

Quote
W. H. Trimmer's Diary (CSA).....The following diary excerpt was sent to me by Tim Wyatt.  William Trimmer was a great uncle of Tim's.  Trimmer served in Abell's Company and in the 1st Florida infantry regiment.  What follows is a brief account of events preceding his capture written to his relatives in England.  It tells of how he was captured in the battle of Olustee and sent to Jacksonville as a prisoner.  The part of the diary below is a little long for this news magazine but I found it very interesting and thought you may also.  There is mention made of women coming over to the camp and an all night long dance, battles with cavalry, artillery and a little bit of everything else. If you have any questions, you can contact Tim Watt at twyatt@iim.csic.es

How I Was Captured
by
William Henry Trimmer

We were returning from the Savanna River where we had been stationed a month, the detachment consisted of a 2nd Lieutenant, a Sergeant, Corporal and twelve men in charge of one howitzer caisson and twelve horses. The officer and the Sergeant also rode their own horses. We belonged to a six gun battery that was now near Fernandina and we had been ordered upon this trip to protect a blockade runner that was loading with cotton.

Our camp had been located a little back from the river in a portion known as the Gulf xxxxmuck. The vegetation here is perhaps the most luxuriant in the State, Royal palms, Cabbage Palmetto often seventy feet in height. Live Oaks of giant proportions, gums, Orange and other evergreens. In this luxuriant grove we built our camp.

The news of soldiers being at the river soon brought us numerous visitors principally women, and almost every night dancing was kept up. The steamer that was loading cotton was down the river about half a mile and a guard of two men was kept continually at her. We had all been swimming which was a daily occurrence the alligators were very numerous but kept their distance. They would surround us ten or twelve big fellows the eyes and small portion of their heads all that they exposed. Some that were killed measured fourteen feet.

At one of the many dances an unusual number of girls were present and many of these fair maids walked many miles, all of them carried their shoes and extras as shoeleather and calico were equally scarce. These girls would be dusty and tired but would fix themselves in their starched calico dresses and shoes and looked as pretty and clean as if at their homes. Calico was then selling at from thirty to fifty cents a yard and shoes six to ten dollars a pair.

An old log house with a floor of functions which were pine saplings split and smoothed was the very place for the dance a stick in dirt chimney at the gable end the boys fixed up plank seats on either side and at dark the dance commenced, lightwood was in abundance and a good fire kept up a fiddle borrowed from the steamer played reels and break downs to the satisfaction of all. In an hour most of the girls had taken off their shoes and while resting used snuff freely. The boys smoked and frequently if the fair partner wanted a whiff the boy would take from his own mouth wipe the stem under his shirt sleeve and put it in her mouth. All were in a state of perspiration the night being warm and a big fire in the chimney.

About 10 o'clock a general rest was taken and big iron pots of beef bones and sweet potatoes were dished out in everyone's hands.

The dancing then went on and continued till day. One of the drivers Yates in preparing to feed his horses next morning putted the bark of a hollow tree open to empty the corn into when a large rattlesnake crawled out he was poor but measured after being killed twenty-four inches in circumference.

Game was very plenty deer, turkey, wild hogs and panther signs were all about. The vessel as soon as loaded dropped down the river our services being through we were ordered to leave. The soil now is lime formation and enormous boulders of lime rock lay about in the woods. We are now in heavy yellow pine occasionally an oasis of magnolias, live oaks, cabbage palmetto and mahogany would appear.

The lime sinks were all about these show themselves by the rich growth the tangled vines and flowers Now we pass through a sandy soil and large cactus and prickly pear these are covered with bright yellow flowers but the thorns are dangerous. Our horses suffer a good deal as the ground is matted with this particular growth. Late in the evening we stop at a lime sink for water all the buckets are put in use and a long rope also the rocks descend abruptly and all find difficulty the water clear as crystal and icy.

One of the men in climb back discovered on a ledge the body of a grown man and beside it dead a large puma; the man had evidently come after water and the puma must have sprung upon him, the man had defended himself as best he could for in his hand was an open knife which had stabbed and disemboweled the cat. He was terribly bit and clothing torn and had died from wounds and starvation. They had been dead some days so we hoisted the body of the man and buried it in the pine woods. This lime sink was all of 40 feet in depth and to reach the water fully ten more.

Continuing our march day after day the trip across the peninsular occupied ten days passing through virgin forests of yellow pine large herds of wild cattle in which generally deer were found.

Many friendly Seminole Indians came to our camp seeking tobacco and liquor that always had game of some kind to exchange.

At Hartz Roads we joined the company. Previous to this trip I had been Quartermaster Sergt of the battery for misconduct, gambling etc the Captain of his own accord had me reduced to the ranks and my chevrons torn off my jacket. Upon my return from the trip, the Captain complimented me upon my good conduct and soldierly bearing and said he would appoint me a corporal, this I refused saying I preferred to remain in the ranks.

Our Captain claimed to be a religious man and frequently was seen kneeling. One night soon after our return the company had been dismissed  the Captain was seen kneeling in his bush arbor.

He soon got up calling for the orderly sergeant to reform the company immediately which being done the captain stepped to the front and said

"Men I have called you together to inform you that some scoundrel has grossly insulted me by throwing cow manure at me while I was engaged in prayer; I know who the man is and intended killing him on sight, he had in his hand a Navy Colt but I prefer that the scoundrel shall acknowledge by stepping out two paces I will give him five minutes or I shall kill him in ranks"; ---turning to his bugler said "take the time and call me when the five minutes are up."

All of us felt uneasy I am sure I did many knew who it was but not a word was spoken neither did anyone step to the front.

When the bugler Harrison called time our Captain stepped up slowly pistol in hand "Men" he said "I did not think it possible that the scoundrel would take the risk by refusing to reveal his identity, I have my eye on the villain but will give him five minutes more I intend to kill him as he stands, take the time bugler."

 Another long wait the night was still nothing but the horses munching their corn could be heard at the expiration of the time our captain again came forward this time his pistol was in its holster. "Sergeant dismiss the company you will hear of this in the morning."

Nothing was ever done further more important events occurred in a few days.

Soon after this the paymaster visited the camp, at the time I was under arrest charged with refusal to testify against a comrade also being present at the killing of a cow. The paymasters name was Teesdale and he ranked as a Major. The company being paraded the Captain and Major under a bush arbor with the pay rolls each man was called, the orderly first then the Quartermaster Sergeant Major please pass that name at present I have that man under arrest. And by the way Major I have four men implicated for cow stealing can you not stop sufficient from each of their pay to reimburse the owner the Major replied why certainly Captain of course I can, give me their names and the amount you wish stopped. So after the men had all signed the rolls and some grumbling with the paymaster I was brought up in charge of the guard the captain said this is the man Major I have under arrest and whose name appears at the head of your rolls, he was formerly Quartermaster Sergeant of my battery but I had to reduce him for misconduct.

Turning over the roll and finding my name the paymaster said sign your name here sir pointing to the line I said "I refuse to do it Major you have no right to deduct anything because the Captain asks you to."

The Captain said sign that roll you impudent scoundrel I again refused and you cant make me. After more words the guard was ordered to take me away. My pay amounted to $115.00 less the six which they had deducted. I never received.

In a few days I was returned to duty, the company also was ordered to a camp near Jacksonville. The Yankees were now in possession of this town as they had landed a force a few weeks before and taken it. This was an exceedingly pretty little place the sandy streets were lined with large live oaks and along the river bank some few small schooners and sail boats were kept; the private houses were frame and surrounded by nice flower gardens one could often see the cows standing belly deep in the sluggish river eating the saltygrass that grew out a hundred yards from the bank.

Jacksonville then had only about 3000 people but was a contending point. Our battery supported by some six hundred men both Infantry and cavalry were one morning instructed to retake the place.

The battery was stationed at and near the old Brick Church we succeeded after stubborn fighting in running the Yankees to their boats. The infantry did some hard work our guns used a good deal of ammunition three of our men were killed and several wounded the Infantry lost about seventy five killed & wounded. We only held the town about ten days as the sequel will show.

stephendare

March 02, 2010, 12:30:02 AM
continued

Quote
The company returned to the “White House” and remained in camp. A very unfortunate affair occurred here in which we lost a promising officer Lieutenant. He was boarding at a house kept by Pickett and had a room upstairs. Early in the morning Pickett going from room to room making fires found the Lieutenant in his wife's bed and he was shot and killed although defending himself with a chair. Two of our guns were now taken and sent to General Finnegan about Lake City who had then collected quite a little army one of the caissons had broken down and left in the road abandoned.  

At night a detail of five men and two horses was sent to bring in the caisson we succeeded in getting back to camp about midnight. The night was very cool and frosty the men were sleeping out in the open the camp being alongside the Rail road. The lightwood fires had been allowed to die down we were cold and threw on some knots standing up warming ourselves. Without warning no pickets giving the alarm, a body of galloping horses and cursing men charged upon the sleeping camp firing their carbines and slashing with their swords shouting surrender you Rebel sons of bitches as I was awake and standing by the fire I just had time to run and cross the rail road hiding behind a big yellow pine tree entirely in the dark. The camp was completely surprised and in the hands of the cavalry men who made all surrender that they captured I witnessed the whole performance never moving from the tree.

In a few minutes horses were hitched to the four guns the caissons battery wagon and what camp equipage they could collect in their hurry setting fire to the rest, then left. Bob Murray received a terrible slash on his forehead cutting the scalp, he came over to me and I bound up his wound with a piece of my shirt; neither of us had anything but what we stood in not even a blanket. Bob said several men were killed but more wounded. After all was again quiet we took the rail road considering ourselves fortunate to get away. Before day we arrived at Baldwin station where the Cedar Keys & Fernandina rail road and the Tallahassee & Jacksonville cross one another, here back from the platform was a large frame building known as the Askham house we entered the public room where several soldiers had congregated round a fire some had escaped from the captured camp like ourselves.

I had been in the room but a short time when who should come in but my captain truly in a deplorable plight, all made room for him at the fire he told us that at the alarm he just had time to throw himself on his horse --- as he was asleep close to where  the animal a fine black stallion was hitched without bridle or saddle only the head stall the leather strap he put in his mouth and left the horse having little to guide him floundered into a cypress pond bogging himself and the captain in the black mud; thinking it wise to abandon the horse and save himself. He said he had a terrible time and only with great difficulty getting out, being well baptized. He had neither coat, or cap, had his sword belt and scabbard, but no sword, also pistol in holster he was covered with mud. I felt sorry for my captains sad condition and told him so. I did not see him any more till after the surrender.

About day break some one gave the alarm save yourselves men the Yankees are coming, the cavalry were sure on us I ran but was ridden down by a trooper and fell in the palmetto, finding that I was unhurt I crawled into thicker grass, Soon the women were screaming the chickens squalling and loud cursing indicated foraging. Late in the evening the troopers found a pen of beef cattle, these they turned loose amusing themselves by shooting them, the cattle frequently ran over me but I laid still.

About dark bugle calls were heard the tramping of horses, jingling of chains getting closer. I hear orders to stretch the picket rope, to dismount and hitch, later to the cooks to be careful to keep fire out of the grass. In spite of the caution I soon found myself obliged to get out as the fire was heading for me; at the picket rope I was grabbed in the collar and without ceremony taken to the Colonel thinking me a spy.

I was at once taken before General Seymore he with his staff occupying the hotel we had left so hurriedly. Good evening Colonel who have you there asked the General.Why only one of those dammed Florida swamp foxes replied the Colonel my men have just burnt out

The General then asked what I was doing hid away in the grass I told him how his troopers had captured our camp and how I got away he said are you hungry I told him I was but wanted water, he told one of the guard to give me some. Sergeant he said seeing the places where chevrons had been what battery do you belong to I told him he replied yes it was some of your dammed gunners that killed my men at the brick church continuing he said about how many men has General Finnigan and told me that his troopers had captured four guns of your battery where are the other two.

After more questions Sergeant you seem to be an intelligent fellow if you will take the oath I will turn you loose. I replied I am no fellow General our negroes are fellows well said he you are an intelligent man here take the oath. I have taken one oath to support and defend the Confederacy surely you do not wish me to violate that.

Well he said I shall send you North this closed the interview take this incorrigible rebel Corporal and put him with the other prisoners. Here I met several comrades and others, many were wounded, all were hungry. I had eaten nothing for 36 hours and when at midnight buckets of boiled rice without salt were passed to us to help yourselves Johnnies each digging into the starchy mass ravenously. Soon after day a line of empty wagons came up the wounded were carried out first and laid on straw we then got in six men to a wagon a guard from the 112th N.Y. going along.

Each guard had full haversacks which they divided on the journey of 23 miles. Arriving at Jacksonville we were turned over to a company of the 54th Mass. Regiment Negroes who were the Provost guard. They had but just come from Battery Wagner where they had suffered Putting us into a long brick building upstairs opposite the St Johns River as the wagons passed along the sandy street we saw numbers of obstructions and abates the beautiful live oaks had been cut down their trunks sharpened outboard.  

The negro sergeant in charge of us soon had meat, and bread, issued to us, getting me to divide it out. The wounded were taken to the hospital saving themselves a future imprisonment

The sergeant proved to be a clever fellow named Welsh educated very civil rendering me many little services I saw him years after he then had a position in the Custom House at Pensacola. A few days before we were put on the transport an opportunity to take the oath was given.

Welsh had told me they were going to send us North also that they, General Seymore had met a severe reverse at Olustree. Some six or eight took the oath among them two of our drivers named Genton one of these men had killed the cow for which I had been arrested and humiliated. The transport a small propeller twelve negro guard detailed to take us in charge.

There were about 68 of us some were seafaring men and it was arranged to overpower the guard who were with us between decks xxxing up the coast the plan was to seize the guns of the guard off duty stacked in the rack. The white Lieutenant was up above two guards marched back and forth in front of us these were secured, their guns taken and a rush made for the arms rack. Alarm was given above before any could get up the companion way the hatches were battened down.

The guard below were in charge. Soon sailor men with the Lieutenant came through the hatch each with short cutlass and pistol prepared to kill the last one the negroes were released and for punishment our rations were entirely stopped. Some of the prisoners were clubbed none seriously. Arriving at Hilton Head the day bitterly cold 17th Feb 1864 we were put into a shed where we were confined for two weeks scanty rations and no blanket or overcoat given to any. While here we learned particulars of the Olustree fight. We are again put on transport this time it was the Steamer Baltic  formerly running in the Collins Line to Europe arriving at New York we were transferred from the steamer to Castle William….Island …. crowded……….

 Page 19 is torn off at this point.

**********************************************************************

Follow up sent to me by David Trimmier:

CSA pension file no. A06286

William Henry Trimmer

Born: 7 Sep 1835 in Kent England

Soldier’s Claim for Pension (CSA service)

State of Florida, Escambia County

On this first day of September 1903 personally appeared before me, Clerk of the Circuit Court in and for said county and State, Wm. H. Trimmer who being by me duly affirmed, declares he is the identical person who enlisted on or about the 24th day of March 1861 in Captain Wm E Cropp. Company, county of Franklin, in the State of Florida and that while in actual service in said company and in line of duty as such soldier, at Pensacola, State of Florida, on 1861 and was honorably discharged at the expiration of his service on the 4th day of April in Montgomery County, State of Alabama from first twelve month service. He reenlisted in Richmond, Va. Was at the Battle of Seven Pines May 30, 1862. Detailed as clerk of hospital on Cary St. Richmond; transferred to Selma, Ala. Worked on Ram Tennessee; detailed to serve on court martial at Lake City, Fla; transferred to Abel’s Battery of Artillery as Quarter Master Sergeant. Captured by Yankees at Olustee about Feb. 12, 1864 and carried as prisoner of war to Jacksonville, Fla. Thence to Hilton Head, thence to Governor’s Island, New York Harbor where I remained till May 20, 1865 when I was paroled with ten thousand others. I did not receive one dollar from Confederate Gov. for 18 months.

Affirmed and subscribed before me this 31st day of August 1903 (signature illegible) Clerk Circuit Court Escambia County

BridgeTroll

March 02, 2010, 07:09:27 AM
Facinating... great find!

sheclown

March 02, 2010, 08:35:54 AM
congrats MJ, this is huge.

devlinmann

March 02, 2010, 10:32:38 AM
i am stunned, fascinated and dying to hear more.

is there anyway for us to help preserve this site?

Dan B

March 02, 2010, 11:58:38 AM
Several sources I have found said that the "Brick Church", which did seem to be the center of a couple of skirmishes, and one battle, was on the site of what later become "LaVilla Junction".

Anyone know where that is/was?

samiam

March 02, 2010, 12:47:31 PM
stephendare I have been collecting Jacksonville civil war history for years. I have a list of websights
That I have used to find leads for places to relic hunt. The article mentioned the old brick church. I remembered reading about it several years ago. I consider myself an armature archaeologist and have been on digs in germany, france and all over the southeastern U.S.

Cliffs_Daughter

March 02, 2010, 02:46:39 PM
LaVilla Junction - from what I see online, it was the where the
Jacksonville,Tampa and Key West Railway -and- the Florida, Atlantic and Gulf Central Railroad met up.

OCK, this is your stuff, care to educate me on this?

Ocklawaha

March 02, 2010, 08:32:20 PM
i am stunned, fascinated and dying to hear more.

is there anyway for us to help preserve this site?

Devlin, pouring on the stage lights of history, and exposing every angle, is perhaps the best way to get the city's attention. Jacksonville is not unlike the Sleeping Giant of 1941, let's just hope it doesn't require a Pearl Harbor to wake it the hell up.

BTW, I came across some of your branch of the family's history, and have a sketch back to 1206.


OCKLAWAHA

devlinmann

March 02, 2010, 08:34:39 PM
i am stunned, fascinated and dying to hear more.

is there anyway for us to help preserve this site?

Devlin, pouring on the stage lights of history, and exposing every angle, is perhaps the best way to get the city's attention. Jacksonville is not unlike the Sleeping Giant of 1941, let's just hope it doesn't require a Pearl Harbor to wake it the hell up.

BTW, I came across some of your branch of the family's history, and have a sketch back to 1206.


OCKLAWAHA

would love to see that

urbanlibertarian

March 02, 2010, 09:15:26 PM
I seem to remember reading that 1.the Confederates had an artillery piece on a rail car that they used to harass the Union forces occupying Jax, 2. the red brick church was built as the result of a rift in the local Baptist congregation over race and 3. a large number of Union sympathisers were provided safe passage out of town during the first Union occupation.

stjr

March 02, 2010, 10:53:36 PM
Quote
(The Old) Brick Church Cemetery
Church site was on Church St (formerly Old Black Creek Rd) just W of Myrtle Ave
Cemetery site was "of considerable size just to the south of it"
Jacksonville, Fl

Help me out here.  It appears to me the site featured in the photos is on the EAST side of Myrtle.  This reference above from Samiam's cite is to the WEST.  Did Myrtle get relocated at some point?  West of current day Myrtle puts you in the midst of some industrial brick buildings and if you go far enough west (a few hundred feet) you end up on JTA property, where their buses exit, I believe.  In the midst of this is a drainage ditch the city had rebuilt a few years ago.  Wonder if they found any artifacts then?

By the way, I heard the Sun Battery building (built in 1914 per property tax records) at the end of Adams, west of Myrtle, may have some historic interest as well.  Someone might want to investigate that too.

Dan B

March 02, 2010, 11:14:02 PM
May be unrelated, but may not. A couple of peices kinda fit. Might be worth looking into more

Quote
Pastor of East Jacksonville church and of St. Paul's church in Lavilla, where he built the first brick church in Florida (AME) and paid for it.

I dont know much about Rev Braddock, not even sure if his age fits.

stjr

March 02, 2010, 11:30:46 PM
Quote
...ern soldiers pitched their camp in west Jacksonville in the pine woods between Broad Street and Myrtle Avenue. The Brick. Church became a picket station and ...

The below link to a 1963 scholarly journal of the Florida Historical Society is cited by Google above.  However, the subject pages are not available to non-subscribers.  Perhaps a subscriber here or a visitor to the public library could find more info in this article on the brick church.

http://www.jstor.org/pss/30139964

About Sam Proctor, the author (from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Samuel_Proctor ):

Quote
Samuel Proctor (1921–July 10, 2005) was an American historian.

Early life and education

Proctor was born in Jacksonville, Florida, one of six sons of a textile salesman and a housewife.

Proctor arrived at the University of Florida as a freshman in 1937 and received his Bachelor of Arts in 1941. As an undergraduate, he was on the staff of the Florida Alligator. He received his Master of Arts from UF in 1942 after only two semesters, in which the wrote a 560-page thesis on Florida Governor Napoleon Bonaparte Broward.

Proctor served in the United States Army during World War II, where he taught reading and arithmetic to illiterate Army recruits at Camp Blanding near Starke.
[edit] Career at the University of Florida

Discharged from the service in 1946, he was offered scholarships to pursue an international law degree at Yale and Ohio State. However, he instead decided to return to the University of Florida, originally to attend the College of Law. One of his former professors, William Carleton (chairman of the freshman social sciences program and later namesake of Carleton Hall) convinced him to help alleviate the post-war shortage of teachers.

In 1953, University President J. Hillis Miller, Sr. named Proctor the first UF Historian and Archivist and commissioned for him a book on UF history in honor of the university’s 100th anniversary. The resulting work was submitted by Proctor as his dissertation, and he received his Ph.D. in 1958. Proctor remained the UF Historian and Archivist until his death, serving even in retirement. He published a history of the university, Gator History: A Pictorial History of the University of Florida, in 1986 with Langley Press.

Proctor became a professor of history at the UF and taught at the university for 50 years.

Proctor was a leading figure in the development of oral history. He founded the Oral History Program in 1967 (which is now one of the largest oral history programs in the United States) and was its director. The program was later renamed the Samuel Proctor Oral History Program in his honor.

He was also noted as an expert on Florida history, and edited the journal Florida Historical Quarterly for over 40 years. He held the titles of Julian C. Yonge Professor of Florida History and Distinguished Service Professor of History. Proctor also held the post of Curator of History at the Florida Museum of Natural History and was the director of the Center for Florida Studies. Proctor also served as the University of Florida Historian. He established the University Archives and wrote major works on the university's history. Proctor is also credited with helping to establish the Center for Jewish Studies at UF.

Proctor was one of two academics to be on the 1998 Lakeland Ledger list of the "50 Most Important Floridians of the 20th Century," selected by a panel of distinguished Floridians.

Proctor retiring from teaching in 1993 but remained involved with the university, maintaining an office in Turlington Hall and heading several University of Florida Alumni Association and University of Florida Foundation committees.

Proctor also served as an expert witness in court and received a Lifetime Achievement Award from the Florida Historical Society. The Samuel Proctor Endowment was established in his honor for history graduate students, known as Samuel Proctor Scholars.

Proctor was a longtime friend of Bob Graham, the Florida governor and U.S. Senator who was one of his students.

Ocklawaha

March 02, 2010, 11:34:30 PM
STJR, Myrtle appears to cut off the southwestern most 1/3 of the property of the old church, based on a sighting of the 4 massive trees. There are several angles in the original routes, as the grid and the old roadways don't always match.

Dan B, Interesting find, the Braddocks a white family of Cracker Pioneers lived along the Crescent Lake, South of Palatka. If the pastor was a "man of color" then the connection may go back to slavery or to free immigration of muleto French, English and Spanish. English names were often taken from a mentor or kind family or friend, many more were taken from the slave family but usually that is somewhat limited to those that treated their servants well.

One of the battlefields where I placed a marker is at "The Battle of Braddocks Farm," located in the SW edge of Crescent City at the old Braddock cemetery. Another of Florida's many small Confederate victories, JJ Dickison and the 2Nd Florida Cavalry ambushed the wagon train of the 17 Connecticut Infantry. The battle had a Hollywood ending with Dickison shooting the charging commander of the 17Th, Col. Wilcoxson out of the saddle.


Quote
Here's the story from my little group: http://www.fcphs.com/Battle_of_Braddocks_Farm.htm

Florida was the Confederacy's least populated State, so it was not able to supply as many men to the War effort(FL did provide more per capita than any State and also suffered more losses per capita), but was able to supply many needed items, such as meat, food, wood, and cotton. The Union knew that if the supply to the Southern troops could be cut off, they could starve the Confederacy into surrender. In February, Col. Albert H. Wilcoxson, the Commanding Officer of the Union forces at St. Augustine took approximately  75 men on a raid of the interior of the State. He traveled to Braddock's farm, and used it as a headquarters from which he could raid area farms.

Capt. J.J. Dickison heard of these raids and set out to end them. With  approximately 50 men, he caught up with Wilcoxson and the 17th CT  Infantry as they were leaving Braddock's farm with ten wagons loaded with Cotton and other confiscated items. Dickison's troops caught the 17th CT off guard, and a quick, but decisive battle ensued. When Wilcoxson realized he was under attack, he drew is pistol and began firing from horseback. When his bullets were exhausted, he drew his            sword and charged Capt. Dickison. Dickison drew his pistol and shot Wilcoxson from his horse. This brief, but fiery skirmish resulted in no Confederate casualties, but the Union lost four men. After the fight,  Dickison approached Wilcoxson, lying on the ground, and asked why he had charged. Wilcoxson simply said, "Don't blame yourself, you are only doing your duty as a soldier. I alone am to blame".  Approximately eight Federals escaped into the swamps and made it back to St. Augustine. All others were taken prisoner.

After the battle, Wilcoxson's widow wrote to Capt. Dickison. She told him that her husband's captured sword was a gift to him from his Masonic Lodge in Norwalk, CT. She asked that it be returned to her so that she could present it to the Lodge. Capt. Dickison, also a Mason, obliged her and told her that it was being returned, "on account of the feelings I entertained for your husband as a brave officer." The sword is still in the possession of Wilcoxson's Lodge.


OCKLAWAHA

stephendare

March 10, 2010, 09:00:48 AM
Dropped by the Planning Department yesterday with Ocklawaha.

Ran into Joel McEachin, the Historic Preservation Officer.  They have a file on this subject open, and there is some confusion as to whether or not this might be the cemetery of an old Baptist Church that is supposed to be somewhere in the vicinity.  From discussion and looking at the maps, I do not personally believe this to be the case, but we are going with Joel to the site on Friday.



Can anyone do a street name equivelancy to the names of the old streets?

Bill Ectric

March 16, 2010, 08:23:18 PM
Fascinating!

LPBrennan

March 17, 2010, 09:03:31 PM
Also interesting in that the stream known as Brickyard Branch ran just west of Myrtle Avenue- it's that low place on West Church Street that fills with water when it rains.

stjr

March 17, 2010, 09:54:03 PM
Also interesting in that the stream known as Brickyard Branch ran just west of Myrtle Avenue- it's that low place on West Church Street that fills with water when it rains.

LP, is that the stream in the drawing posted by Stephen?  If so, the cemetery in the drawing would indeed appear to be west of Myrtle and the street labeled "Cleveland or Division Lane" may be the current day Myrtle.  This would also be consistent with the quote and post in my post #56 in this thread above.


stephendare

March 17, 2010, 09:58:49 PM
STJR, since that time, Myrtle has been redrawn and if you look at a present day map, it now comes in more at an angle.  The south end of Myrtle is in the correct place (as positioned on the map) but the north end is now skewed.

The intervening streets to the East no longer exist as they are the present day Interstate 95, and the name cleveland street was reused.

Spring Street is the older name for Monroe Street, named after the spring recently rediscovered in the street reconstruction around the Library.

Its fascinatingly still right there at the corner of Monroe and Myrtle, and you can see how the ancient oaks perfectly outline the cemetary as drawn.

stjr

March 17, 2010, 10:18:55 PM
Stephen, I don't see Myrtle named on the map.  After looking at the property appraiser's maps, it appears this stream shown on yours lines up very closely with modern day property lines just west of Myrtle.  So, I am thinking Myrtle might approximate the unnamed street on the map starting at the top between block numbers 114 and 115 and running down to the bottom between block numbers 61 and 10.  Please compare your map to the property appraiser's  maps on their web site to see how similar the stream line matches up.

Also, a sample legal description for a property at the modern day southwest corner of Myrtle and Church reads as follows:


Quote
40-2S-26E .795
LENGLES S/D PT BAPTIST CHURCH LOT
Subdivision    01240 L ENGLES S/D W PT BAP CHC

This implies to me that, indeed, a Baptist church owned property at some point WEST of Myrtle.

Give me your take on all this.

stephendare

March 17, 2010, 10:31:37 PM
Well I can speak to the position of the cemetary on the map shown.  It is a partial picture of a very detailed map whose named streets are unfortunately cropped in the photo.  We did this so that people could actually see the cemetary.

The graveyard (where we found the gravestones and grave structures) is immediately to the east of Myrtle.

not shown in the photos are the streets on the right hand side which are named after the familiar pattern.

Its weird but Im so used to the old names that I can actually understand the code at the bottom of your citation.

1240 L'Engles Subdivision With Primitive Baptist Church.

L'Engles was of course the property surveyor, Francis Fatio L'Engle, and an attache of the Talleyrand family.  He was surveyor in the 1870s I believe.

stjr

March 17, 2010, 10:44:59 PM
Stephen, I think I might be on to something more here.  Here is a quote from the 1999 warranty deed of the property to the WEST of Myrtle I cited above and it specifically mentions a church cemetery and Brickyard Branch (the stream I referred to and which appears to match your drawing):

Parcel 1:
"said Northerly boundary line also being the northerly line of the old Baptist Church Cemetery..." and "... to the Easterly line of Brickyard Branch as the same is now located ..."

Parcel 2:
... a tract known as the Baptist Church Lot in LaVilla ..."


Link to full deed image (Go to page 3, Exhibit  A.): http://www.duvalclerk.com/oncoreweb/showdetails.aspx?Book=8404&Page=1411&BookType=OR

Could there be two cemeteries? 

stephendare

March 17, 2010, 10:49:11 PM
That would imply two churches.

We know from the old maps that the stream was called the brickyard stream.

so youve got that right

This was in the days before they rerouted McCoy's creek and straightened it.

So the church you are talking about would be south of the cemetary?

Bill Ectric

March 17, 2010, 11:03:37 PM
All this is so much fun to read! I can't believe I am just now finding all you folks interested in this sort of thing.

stjr

March 17, 2010, 11:03:52 PM
So the church you are talking about would be south of the cemetary?

Stephen, I can't say where exactly as I have no other information.  Everything I know I posted and you can see.  I can't see your full map, other documents, or what else you saw that is not in the pictures so that doesn't influence me presently.

Not sure it matters.  This deed places both a cemetery and a church WEST of Myrtle.  Your map, when measured against a modern property map, appears to do the same, to me.  And, so does Samiam's previous posted link and citation.  So, I am reasonably convinced a church and cemetery were WEST of Myrtle.

I guess it is possible that one church and one cemetery were large enough at some point to envelop both sites and all the land in between (we are only talking about a block or so).  Maybe Myrtle was built down the middle of the church's property if it came through later.  It does seem plausible that a church built near Brickyard Branch would bear the name "Brickyard Church".  We may very well be talking about the same church/cemetery "complex".

I would think that if someone did a full title search (can you get records here before the 1901 fire?), and read the deed descriptions of all the subject lands, you may find the final answers.

stephendare

March 17, 2010, 11:06:59 PM
There are no records here before 1901 except for a few land platts and the maps we discovered.

samiam

March 17, 2010, 11:07:14 PM
So the church you are talking about would be south of the cemetary?

Stephen, I can't say where exactly as I have no other information.  Everything I know I posted and you can see.  I can't see your full map, other documents, or what else you saw that is not in the pictures so that doesn't influence me presently.

Not sure it matters.  This deed places both a cemetery and a church WEST of Myrtle.  Your map, when measured against a modern property map, appears to do the same, to me.  And, so does Samiam's previous posted link and citation.  So, I am reasonably convinced a church and cemetery were WEST of Myrtle.

I guess it is possible that one church and one cemetery were large enough at some point to envelop both sites and all the land in between (we are only talking about a block or so).  Maybe Myrtle was built down the middle of the church's property if it came through later.  It does seem plausible that a church built near Brickyard Branch would bear the name "Brickyard Church".  We may very well be talking about the same church/cemetery "complex".

I would think that if someone did a full title search (can you get records here before the 1901 fire?), and read the deed descriptions of all the subject lands, you may find the final answers.


Samantha at the historic preservation office is great at this kind of research

Miss Fixit

March 17, 2010, 11:07:49 PM
Yes, STJR, there are records that predate the 1901 fire.  One of the local title companies was savvy enough to save their abstracts.  Some but not all of the records are on the mezzanine level of the courthouse.

stephendare

March 17, 2010, 11:10:20 PM
We are looking for the fully articulated map that shows the brickyard church.  Its actually quite detailed, and it shows the church having access to the water.

The devil is in the details of these maps, and weve actually been trying to relocate the one map that we all perused with the church.

samiam

March 17, 2010, 11:15:35 PM
Have you looked at the Sanborn map they date from 1865 untill 1970

stephendare

March 17, 2010, 11:16:28 PM
you can actually access the 25 or so pre fire maps online at the property appraisers office.

They are from the magical Platt Book 1, of the city.

Miss Fixit is correct that a local title company did save part of their abstracts from the fire, but they will not give the city a copy of their remnants of Book One, for whatever reasons.

stjr

March 17, 2010, 11:18:19 PM
I look forward to a definitive resolution from those with more access to records and the time to do the further research.  Glad I could add whatever light this brings to the subject.

Bill, this it's as much "fun" digging as it is reading it.  All a labor of love.

Miss Fixit, Samiam, and Stephen, maybe you can take it from here with your experience and access.  Thanks and await an update.

stephendare

March 17, 2010, 11:18:49 PM
Have you looked at the Sanborn map they date from 1865 untill 1970

The map that STJR is referring to was an old map when it was recopied in the 1850s, prior to the Civil War.

The contextual clues on the map itself seem to suggest that it was itself a copy made in 1822 with the replatting, and that the church graveyard was a much older feature of the area over which the street platting was placed.

samiam

March 17, 2010, 11:23:33 PM
Many libraries and universities subscribe to proquest digital sanborn collection. a searchable printable database of all the sanborn maps in the library of congress collection

stjr

March 17, 2010, 11:26:21 PM
you can actually access the 25 or so pre fire maps online at the property appraisers office.

They are from the magical Platt Book 1, of the city.

Stephen, can you give us a clue how to access these maps?  I didn't see the link on my review of their site.  

And, one other thought:  Did you consider the possibility that the plat on your map was a plan that was never fully implemented or followed?  Maybe all those blocks and streets were never built, or at least not exactly as shown?  Maybe they had their own version of a real estate bubble bursting and walked away from developments much as we are seeing today.
;)

stephendare

March 17, 2010, 11:35:38 PM
This is true to some extent, stjr, and many of the landplatts that you see on the map are simply blank and undivided. 

The street names changed a a few times (for example, this is the first time in any of the older maps that I had seen the street referred to as "Mansion Street"  (later to become Adams) or Race (later to become Duval)

But in the subsequent maps the course of Myrtle does stay the same, with developed lots until the 1870s after the Civil War, during Reconstruction.

I will diligently search for the links to the old maps STJR.

thelakelander

March 17, 2010, 11:35:58 PM
I looked at the maps in the library a few weeks ago.  Shotgun houses were all over that area from at least around the 1920s, but the cemetary lot shown in the article's images remained undeveloped throughout the 50 years of Sanborn maps they have in the Special Collections department.

stjr

March 17, 2010, 11:49:02 PM
OK, I found you can access Sanborn maps online at the Jax Public Library's web site.  But, you need a library card and mine expired in high school!  :D  We won't say how long ago that was!  Used my kids cards in modern times if I wanted something.  Will have to look at reapplying.
 
Here is a link for access: http://jpl.coj.net/coll/maps/historical.html

Here is a link to see their full listing of maps and availability: http://jpl.coj.net/coll/maps/sanborn3.htm

stjr

March 18, 2010, 12:15:49 AM
University of Florida Library is a little more generous.  They have some Sanborns online for Jax including 1884 and 1887.  '84 doesn't show this area.  '87 comes close but not quite and appears, as Lake indicated, to be blank anyway as it runs off the page.

Here is a link to the zoom in of this area of the map:

http://ufdcweb1.uflib.ufl.edu/ufdc/?m=hd1X&i=160683&vo=01&vp=0,2116


Greater zoom: http://ufdcweb1.uflib.ufl.edu/ufdc/?m=hd1X&i=160683&vo=02&vp=0,3326

Cliffs_Daughter

March 18, 2010, 02:59:58 PM
I found this article online and thought maybe it's what we're looking at?

Florida - a Guide to the Southern-Most State

Pg 193, Section 9 - BETHEL BAPTIST INSTITUTIONAL CHURCH.... "the fund purchased a plot of 2 acres in LaVilla, a residential section, where a small brick church was built. Pickets and outposts were stationed here during the War between the States whenever Jacksonville was occupied by Federal troops..."

http://books.google.com/books?id=6LjWg4xHKVUC&pg=PA193&lpg=PA193&dq=%22brick+church%22+la+villa+florida&source=bl&ots=wIiHY6ttpL&sig=JTtOj9dsy0ZLvQuxuY-_qsku_hE&hl=en&ei=W3aiS66HG4OXtgetkYGQCg&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=2&ved=0CAkQ6AEwAQ#v=onepage&q=&f=false

Cliffs_Daughter

March 18, 2010, 03:15:22 PM
http://bethelite.org/History.aspx

And in Bethel's history, it lists it smack-dab between Duval and Adams in LaVilla

stjr

March 18, 2010, 09:55:29 PM
http://bethelite.org/History.aspx

And in Bethel's history, it lists it smack-dab between Duval and Adams in LaVilla

Cliffs, it appears wherever that was between Duval and Adams, they vacated it before the Civil War and moved into a new church on Church, between Hogan and Julia, per the Church's history quoted below.  So, there seems to be a possible inconsistency between the church's history and the one in the book cited.  Of course, maybe the troops used it because it was "abandoned" at that point.  The other thought is we have been working with sites near Myrtle and Church which are a slightly north of Duval and Adams.  But, given the rough accuracy of the maps I've seen, you could be in the "zone".  ;)  The plot (or, should I say "plat") thickens!


Quote
Deacon Jaudan purchased a lot on Church Street, between Hogan and Julia Streets, and gave it to the church. A new church was built and the congregation entered the new building in the spring of 1861. Soon after the congregation started worship services in the new building, the Federal Army took possession of the Bethel Church and used it as a military hospital for wounded soldiers during the Civil War. The church was left in deplorable condition when vacated by the army troops. At the close of the Civil War, an effort was made to separate the Colored and White members but an agreement could not be reached over possession of the property.

Cliffs_Daughter

March 23, 2010, 03:36:13 PM
stjr - on a hunch, I tried to find anything about Jaudon, and this came up:

http://archiver.rootsweb.ancestry.com/th/read/FLDUVAL/2000-07/0962928606

Elias G. Jaudon was the owner of Magnolia Plantation, a rather large plantation nearing 1,000 acres through Avondale, Edgewood, and LaVilla. I'd love to see a map of that one. The Brick Church site was certainly within this area.  When Elias died in 1887, the land was split and sold.

http://www.historicavondale.com/aboutavondale.html

Hmm... I think the history there may be wrong. Jax Architecture book mentions an obituary and will on file sometime in 1871.



What I read is the church was founded by a Rev. J. Jaudon, and of the 6-member charter congregation 2 were the slaves of Elias Jaudon. It could be these slaves assumed the surname of their master, as was the custom.

http://books.google.com/books?id=A_bZhe4no8UC&lpg=PA49&ots=wdRXwtGI-1&dq=LaVilla%20florida%20Jaudon&pg=PA49#v=onepage&q=LaVilla%20florida%20Jaudon&f=false


Mr. Jaudon was a prominent local figure in the mid-1800's. Below is a link to the congressional serial set volume 656 - Pretty interesting stuff from 1848, if you're into this sort of thing.

http://books.google.com/books?id=A_bZhe4no8UC&lpg=PA49&ots=wdRXwtGI-1&dq=LaVilla%20florida%20Jaudon&pg=PA49#v=onepage&q=LaVilla%20florida%20Jaudon&f=false

stephendare

March 23, 2010, 03:37:28 PM
We finally found several detailed maps of the Brick Church this weekend!

(in addition to the ones wed already found)  they should be copied and online shortly!

stjr

March 30, 2010, 02:09:04 AM
^Stephen, any more on your detailed maps?

Cliff's thanks for the interesting update.  Following your lead, I found a reference to Jaudon and his "little brick church" in the "History of Early Jacksonville" that may shed more light on our subject and where to go next.

Along with Steven, see what you can make of this info.  It appears that the congregation abandoned the "little brick church" before the Civil War but not before a cemetery was added to it.  The church used as a hospital appears to have been the newer 1861 church in Downtown. After the war, it appears the "little brick church" failed to survive and the cemetery ended up under the auspices of First Baptist Church.  Maybe, Stephen, you should investigate First Baptist's archives for more location info.  I included the book's bibliography for this section listing a First Baptist Annual as a source.

I am thinking maybe the "brick church" was located between Duval and Adams, west of present day Myrtle and that the cemetery was to its north (running up to Church Street) and was of such ultimate proportions as to incorporate land that is now on both sides of Myrtle for whatever reason (either the street bisected the property or they bought cemetery land on both sides of an existing street).


(http://74.125.93.132/search?q=cache:nKMEfxy6yAAJ:www.archive.org/stream/historyofearlyja00davi/historyofearlyja00davi_djvu.txt+elias+jaudon+la+villa&cd=7&hl=en&ct=clnk&gl=us ):

Quote
The Baptist denomination was established in
Jacksonville in July, 1838, by Rev. James Mc-
Donald and Rev. Ryan Frier. Mr. Frier was the
State Missionary at that time. There were six
charter members, namely, Rev. James McDonald
and wife, Elias G. Jaudon and wife, and two
colored persons — Peggy, a slave of Elias G.
Jaudon, and Bacchus, a slave of William Edwards.
Rev. James McDonald was the first pastor, and
Elias G. Jaudon the first deacon'.

The congregation increased, and in 1840, pur-
chased the northeast corner at Duval and Newnan
Streets, where a small chapel was erected^ This
was the first church building erected in Jackson-

HISTORY OF EARLY JACKSONVILLE 87

ville. It was a small wooden structure, with a
seating capacity for about 100 persons. It bad a
square tower-like steeple in wbicb was a bell. In
front was a small piazza; there was but one
entrance door. The Baptists sold this property to
the Methodists in 1846', and then bought a plot of
ground two miles west of the court house (Myrtle
Avenue, between Adams and Duval Streets), on
which they erected a small brick church'. This
building was partially wrecked during the civil
war, as it was the scene of nearly all the fighting
that occurred near Jacksonville. The little brick
church had a war history. Pickets and out-posts
were stationed there whenever Jacksonville was
occupied by the Federal troops and near it the
first blood of the war in this vicinity was shed.
Sentinel-like, it witnessed scenes that have never
found a place in print.

A few years after the little brick church was
built, Elias G. Jaudon bought a piece of ground
adjoining the church property and donated it to
the church for a burial ground. Finding them-
selves too far from the center of the city, it was
decided to make yet another change in location,
and again Deacon Jaudon came to the assistance
of the church, by buying and donating a lot on
Church Street, between Julia and Hogan. Here
a house of worship was erected, and dedicated
February 23, 1861. Soon after this the civil war
came on and disrupted the congregation. After
the battle of Olustee, the building was taken pos-



S8 HISTORY OF EARLY JACKSONVILLE

session of by the Federal army and used as a
hospital for wounded soldiers, and from this time
until the close of the war it was used as a military
hospital. The building was left in a deplorable
condition, scarcely a pane of glass remaining in
the windows and very little plastering on the
walls/

The cemetery that was attached to the "little
brick church" still remains, and is the property of
the First Baptist Church. After the war, there
was a division in the membership of the Baptist
Church, the whites bming out the interest of the
colored members in the property, renaming their
church Tabernacle, while the colored branch re-
tained the original name, Bethel Baptist. Taber-
nacle was later changed to First Baptist.

Eev. James McDonald was pastor from 1838 to
1846. From 1846 to 1850, there were several un-
important short pastorates, in which the church
seems to have been unfortunate in obtaining un-
worthy or incompetent men. In 1850, Eev. Joseph
S. Baker became pastor and served four years, dur-
ing which time the church and Sunday-School pros-
pered. In 1859, Eev. E. W. Dennison was called.
At this time the membership was 40 white and
250 colored'.

BIBLIOGEAPHY, CHAPTEE VII.

1 Fifty-two Years in Florida, Ley.

2 History of Florida, Webb. ,

3 Annual of the First Baptist Church of Jacksonville, 1909.

4 Data collected by Mrs. W. M. Bostwick.

5 Historical Sketches of the Church in Florida, J. J. Daniel.

6 Father J. Veale.

P.S. I did some more Google searching and found that Elias Jaudon and others chartered with the State a "La Villa Institute" in January/February, 1861.  Interestingly, two of his partners were an S.L. Robinson and J. McRobert Baker.  Just west of La Villa, there is a Robinson's Addition across from the Jacksonville Farmers Market on West Beaver Street that includes a Robinson Avenue and Baker Street.  Might these be the same people?

See link to "Acts and Resolutions adopted by the General Assembly of Florida" at: http://books.google.com/books?id=kQA4AAAAIAAJ&pg=PA157&lpg=PA157&dq=jaudon+la+villa&source=bl&ots=UicVi5lwO0&sig=tS43wpC4qMgFEWoS9R31NHIfhfc&hl=en&ei=H4GxS_7yNMGC8gbntqDLAQ&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=6&ved=0CBMQ6AEwBQ#v=onepage&q=jaudon%20la%20villa&f=false




stjr

March 30, 2010, 03:04:02 AM
More references to La Villa and the brickyard and/or brick church during the Civil War from the above referenced book:

In 1862:


Quote
Another meet-
ing of the loyal citizens was held on the 24th of
March and a committee of five was appointed to
take steps toward obtaining the co-operation of
other counties in the State in the effort to orga-
nize a state government under the jurisdiction of
the United States. To this end a convention was
called to meet at Jacksonville on April 10, 1862.

In the afternoon of March 24th, General H. G.
Wright and the 97th Pennsylvania regiment ar-
rived. General Wright assuming command of the
troops in Jacksonville. The Confederates had
by this time moved nearer the town and occupied



HISTORY OF EARLY JACKSONVILLE 167

a position at McGirt's Creek, about 10 miles west
in the direction of Baldwin. On the night of
March 24th, a Federal picket of two men that had
gone beyond the lines was captured, and at 3 a.
m. March 25th, the Confederates attacked a
picket at the old brick yard in West LaVilla, kill-
ing four and capturing three of them. Lieutenant
Strange (C. S. A.) was mortally wounded here.
This evidently was the first blood of the war
spilled in this vicinity.


On the night of March 27th, a Federal picket
fired upon a party approaching them in what they
conceived a suspicious manner, and of the two in
advance, one was killed and the other wounded.
They proved to be a party of negroes that had
escaped from their masters at Lake City. The
next day. General Wright, hearing that the Con-
federates were contemplating an attack upon
Jacksonville, sent to Fernandina for two sections
of Hamilton's battery. Its arrival brought the
Federal force in Jacksonville up to 1,400 men.
No attack was made, however, and a few days later
the evacuation of the town was ordered.

THE EVACUATION.

General Wright, in his official report, describes
the evacuation as follows:

On the 7th (April, 1862) preparations for with-
drawing were begun by embarking the public stores,
and on the 8th, at 12 noon, the troops were marched

168 HISTORY OF EARLY JACKSONVILLE

on board and the embarkation was completed by 2
p. m. the same day. Owing to the heavy wind which
had sprung up during the morning, it was impos-
sible to get all the transports clear of the wharf until
near sunset — too late to move safely very far down
the intricate channel of the river that night — and
it was therefore determined to lay off the town until
morning. This I was more willing to do, as it took
from our movement all appearance of a hasty re-
treat. At 6 a. m. of the 9th, the transports, con-
voyed by the gunboats, proceeded down the river.

It is said that General Wright notified the Con-
federates of the intended evacuation and re-
quested them to resume their occupation of the
town, whereupon a detachment of the First Florida
calvary rode in and stood on the wharf watching
the gunboats sail away.

The evacuation of Jacksonville by the Federal
forces was unfortunate for *4oyaP' citizens, the
bona-fide ones as well as for those who, supposing
the occupation would be permanent, sought to
further their personal interests by disclaiming all
connection with the Southern cause and remained
within the Union lines. When it became known
that the town was to be evacuated, the greatest
excitement prevailed among the people; their
principal desire now was to get out of Jackson-
ville, for fear of vengeance. The morning of
April 8th was very hot. There was the greatest
confusion, as the people hurriedly tried to get
their goods, furniture, and valuables on board of

HISTORY OF EARLY JACKSONVILLE 169

the transports'. They embarked with the Federal
fleet and were carried to Fernandina and quar-
tered in the vacant buildings there. Most of them
had to rely on rations issued from the United
States stores.

Just before the evacuation, General Wright was
directed by the general commanding the depart-
ment, T. W. Sherman, to issue the following
notice :

HEADQUARTERS THIRD BRIGADE.

Jacksonville, Fla., April 7, 1862.
(NOTICE). In accordance with an order issued by
the general commanding the Department of the
South the troops will be withdrawn from this place,
and I am directed by him to notify the people of
Jacksonville that it is his intention to have all the
aid and protection afforded the loyal inhabitants
of the interior of Florida that is practicable for the
security of their persons and property, and for the
punishment of outrages, and that he holds all per-
sons in that vicinity responsible for the preservation
of order and quiet, being fully determined that any
outrages upon persons or property contrary to the
laws and usages of war shall be visited fourfold upon
the inhabitants of disloyal or doubtful character
nearest the scenes of any such wrongs, when the
actual or known perpetrators cannot be discovered.

The undersigned trusts that inasmuch as the un-
offending citizens of this place have been treated
with the utmost forbearance by our forces, it will

170 HISTORY OF EARLY JACKSONVILLE

not be necessary to carry out the intention in the
last clause of the above notice.

H. G. Wright,
Brigadier-General Commanding.

General Wright himself was a gentleman as well
as a soldier. His correspondence with Colonel
W. G. M. Davis (C. S. A.) indicates this, when he
says:

The policy of removal from Jacksonville of such
persons as may desire to leave our lines to join their
families or to reside in the interior of the State will
be continued and on application to these headquar-
ters such permission will be granted as will carry
them safely beyond our lines. We do not propose
to wage Avar upon women and children, nor upon
quiet unoffending citizens, but on the contrary have
done all in our power for the protection of their
persons and property. In announcing this policy I
have to express the hope that it will be reciprocated
by yourself in permitting the free return to Jack-
sonville of such persons as may desire to come back
to their homes. I desire further to say that the
forces under my command are instructed to carry
on all operations according to the rules of civilized
warfare, and that any outrages upon unarmed or
unoffending citizens will be punished to the full ex-
tent of the law. From the representations made to
me of your character as an officer and a gentleman, I
am sure you will be governed by a similar spirit.

HISTORY OF EARLY JACKSONVILLE 171

General Wriglit had been in Jacksonville be-
fore. It was he that made the survey of St. Johns
bar in 1853, and advanced the idea of overcoming
the difficulties by means of a single pier or jetty
across the bar. We may assume that he knew
many of our citizens personally, and when, as a
war measure, he was in military control of the
town, that property here did not suffer during his
occupation.

The following is the report of Colonel W. S. Dil-
worth (C. S. A.) commanding the district of East
and Middle Florida, dated April 15, 1862, regard-
ing the operations of the Confederate troops in
front of Jacksonville during the occupation of
the town by the Federal forces:

When the enemy first occupied Jacksonville and
while all the Florida troops were retreating in con-
fusion and disorder, I, as colonel of the Third Regi-
ment Florida Volunteers, ordered a part of my regi-
ment to advance in the direction of Jacksonville and
take a position within ten miles of the city, with
only 250 effective men. Soon I had eight companies
of my regiment with me. After making a thorough
reconnaissance of the city, I became convinced that
I could not attack the city without heavy loss and
could be driven out by the enemy 's gunboats. I then
determined to commence a system of annoyances,
by attacking their pickets, foraging parties, etc. I
made a successful attack on the picket near the
city of Jacksonville, killing four and taking three
prisoners, when I was ordered to take command of

' 172 HISTORY OF EARLY JACKSONVILLE

the district.
Colonel Davis was then ordered to the
command of the forces near Jacksonville, and has
most successfully carried on the system which I com-
menced and which has resulted in their evacuation
of the place. I have further to report that after the
evacuation the enemy returned under a flag of truce
and were permitted to land 52 negroes, which were
taken in charge by the commander of the post.

Jacksonville was not regularly occupied after-
ward by Confederate troops, such an attempt be-
ing useless as long as the river remained open to
the Federal gunboats. Confederate detachments
occasionally came into town, however, just to see
how things were getting along, but after a short
time withdrew.

In 1863:

Quote
On March 17th, Colonel McCormick (C. S. A.),
by direction of General Finegan, notified Colonel
Higginson to remove the women and children
from Jacksonville within 24 hours, or that after
that time they would remain in the town on his
( Higginson 's) responsibility. Colonel Higgin-
son immediately ordered his wagons to convey all
those who wished to leave to the brick yard church,
where they were met under a flag of truce by a
Confederate escort.
Thus all the women and
children, except a few families, were removed
from Jacksonville and sent to Lake City.




JaxHistory

March 30, 2010, 02:02:53 PM
Just returned from the site. Have some reservations about there actually being remnants of the old cemetery out there.

I think y'all are correct about the fact that there was once a cemetery there. The outline of the tress would seem to indicate this, or in the very least that there was a large open space there.   However, I found it very hard to disseminate between the debris from the old houses, as well as the inordinate amount of trash, and what seems to be portrayed as tombstones in the above picture.

Here are some questions that I hope one of y'all can answer:
 
  • If we are to assume that this was a cemetery in place before the War, is it likely that the tombstones would be made out of stone and/or that they would still survive.  Keeping in mind that this area seems to have transitioned form Residential to Industrial over the years.
  • Keeping in mind the numerous uses over the years, is plausible that if this was a cemetery it was moved and/or demolished.



All that being said this is very exciting.  Can't wait to find out more. 

stephendare

March 30, 2010, 02:26:06 PM
Thanks JaxHistory.

Ive done some digging around in subsequent trips, and found that what we mistook for housing debris was actually identical grave construction to the oldest graves found in the City Cemetary downtown.

There are a couple of headstone pieces, clearly made of stone and engraved from the site---sadly no writing, just lines.

Cliffs_Daughter

March 30, 2010, 03:07:46 PM
Well something's up with the site - it doesn't have a parcel ID in the GIS maps or tax property search. No definable address, nothing to show ownership of that block now. Surrounding areas are marked, but nothing at all on the lot in question.

stjr

March 30, 2010, 07:17:38 PM
Stephen, did you catch my post #90 regarding checking the records of First Baptist Church which apparently became the owner of the subject cemetery?  Any more on your maps?

devlinmann

March 31, 2010, 07:47:35 AM
I am greatly enjoying this thread, more please!!

Timkin

July 31, 2010, 12:36:23 AM
This is very interesting.. I would love to visit this site....

A related (but not to this cemetary)   ...Allegedly  there was a small Cemetary in Arlington (Approximately at or near the intersections of Mt.Pleasent/ Fort Caroline .  Now  a Subdivision is over it..

So it is not shocking at all to learn that this happened in that instance as well..

For all we know ..100 years from now, when none of us are here , or are too old to care,  There will be something built on all of the existing cemetaries ... I think this is SO wrong...

fltelman

September 29, 2010, 06:57:24 AM
I have a friend that found a small canon ball at this site in the 1980s. He used a metal detector and knew that there had been a civil war battle on that site.

As for the cemetery, I wonder if someone could use ground-penetrating radar like they did at Lee Kirkland cemetery.  http://americancityandcounty.com/pubwks/parks_grounds_pests/fight_remains_pride_lee/

http://fl-genweb.org/duval/dcems/index.html

JaxNative68

October 04, 2010, 06:21:37 PM
This is very interesting.. I would love to visit this site....

A related (but not to this cemetary)   ...Allegedly  there was a small Cemetary in Arlington (Approximately at or near the intersections of Mt.Pleasent/ Fort Caroline .  Now  a Subdivision is over it..

So it is not shocking at all to learn that this happened in that instance as well..

For all we know ..100 years from now, when none of us are here , or are too old to care,  There will be something built on all of the existing cemetaries ... I think this is SO wrong...

There is also a small cemetery that still stands off Fort Caroline Road in the Cove St. John's neighborhood.  If I remember correctly, some of the graves date back to the 1800's and some as recent as the 1970's.  Growing up, I was always creeped out by it because it was almost in my backyard.  I was told it was the family cemetery of the old plantation that used to occupy the land of the neighborhood.  The coj.net property maps do not show an address or owner of this property.  Its off Cove St Johns Road, between 6873 and 3972.  If anyone knows anything about this cemetery, please post the info.

spuwho

November 04, 2010, 01:13:09 AM
This is an old thread, but I just picked up on it. If you look at this;

http://lcweb2.loc.gov/cgi-bin/map_item.pl?data=/home/www/data/gmd/gmd393/g3934/g3934j/pm001140.sid&style=pmmap&itemLink=D?gmd:7:./temp/~ammem_IprG::&title=Jacksonville,+Florida.+

aerial view map of Jacksonville from 1893, you will see the church at the dead end of Monroe. What is today Myrtle, is a 3 block NW road (unidentified in view) between Adams and Church. That NW kink in Myrtle is still there today. If I didn't know better, I would say the original church is in the back and someone has built a house, a school or a bigger church in front of it. The map numbers all churches, and this one is not identifed as a church here. It also sits at an odd angle relative to the rest of the lots, something stephendare pointed out on the early platting map.

I assume the cemetery was in the back.

Ock may like the fact that this map shows a horse drawn traction service coming in off Church, through Myrtle and down Adams, right in front of the church. If you follow what is Myrtle today south of the tracks, it is Haskell Street and Peach Street in Brooklyn.

These renditions are tricky as you can't be sure, but what is Mary Street in 1893 is Minnie Street today. Division (Cleveland Street) has been relocated due to I-95. Kinsman Street is now Eaverson.

This area is tough to map out because the original platting is based on the downtown alignment with the St Johns River. It appears a new platting was done west of Division (Cleveland) which takes on a north/south grid layout. Hence the streets all have small kinks and abbreviated turns to compensate.

Tegeron Street (now Blanche) crosses the "S" Line at Old Kings Road.

Based on the history of FBC and Bethel, it would be interesting to see who really owns the lots now.

spuwho

November 07, 2010, 09:30:08 PM
The Sanborn Map of 1887 shows the location (lots 1440-1442).

http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00074182/00003/72x?td=jacksonville&n=palmm

Today, where Monroe turns north into Duval Street is actually a remnant of Hanover Street. Monroe Street has a pinch in its ROW to accommodate the fact that the structure predated the street by many years. The structure is long gone, but the ROW remains the same.

spuwho

November 11, 2010, 02:35:41 PM
I went out to this site today to check it out and while it is still a haven for trash and other peoples dumping, I did see a 7 foot fence (torn down in places) which surrounds a piece of land just west of where the Old Brick Church was located.

Even though the street signs for Monroe are still there and technically it is a public street, a sign was thrown up saying no trespassing or dumping. (obviously no one cared).

The remaining domicile on Duval Street is for sale and I thought it funny that the street is still brick on this block!

I would have gotten out to look for some headstones or other remnants of the cemetery or church until JSO showed up.

Either someone called me in for driving around, or he happened to come by on Myrtle to see if I was dumping something. Whatever the case was I couldn't stay and moved on.

ghamilton

March 24, 2012, 04:12:49 PM
What agency,institution or group can take the lead in examination,research and preservation of this important site?Is there a foundation already in place that has the interest? An article could be written,sent to various outlets to get a bright light shown on this period and its drama.  There are several Civil War groups that need to be made aware what happened there and what remains.

Ocklawaha

March 24, 2012, 07:37:34 PM
Union Veteran and Author Ambrose Bierce's opinion of the war:

Emerging from the charnel house, Bierce shunned any effort to invest the butchery with meaning - including the North's smug myth of a Battle Cry of Freedom (still cherished by many contemporary historians, as it flatters their sense of their own righteousness). For him the war was nothing more - could be nothing more - than a meaningless and murderous slaughter, devoid of virtue or purpose.

"DEO VINDICE AMBROSE," Ocklawaha


National Park Service Technical Assistance Programs
The National Park Service (NPS) provides technical assistance to its partners -- State, tribal, and local governments, federal agencies, private organizations, and universities -- to promote the protection and preservation of cultural resources. This may take the form of advisory consultation, planning services, site visits, and co-sponsored conferences and workshops. The information and activities are generally available to a broad public as well.
American Battlefield Protection Program

The American Battlefield Protection Program (ABPP) helps communities near historic battlefields to develop local solutions for balanced preservation approaches for these sites. In addition to awarding small matching funds to organizations sponsoring planning and educational projects at historic battlefields, ABPP historians, preservation planners, and archeologists provide technical assistance to owners of battlefield property, battlefield friends groups, and state and local governments interested in preserving historic battlefield land and sites. More information is available at http://www.cr.nps.gov/hps/abpp/index.htm.



SONS OF CONFEDERATE VETERANS

Send E-Mail to the Division General Executive Council:
gec@florida-scv.org
 
DIVISION COMMANDER:
DOUGLAS D. DAWSON
2421 LE RUTH DRIVE
PENSACOLA, FL 32514
(850) 478-3398
dddawson@bellsouth.net

DIVISION ADJUTANT:
ARCHIE L. MATTHEWS
11012 NW 202ND ST
ALACHUA, FL 32615
(386) 462-3016
adjutant@florida-scv.org

6th BRIGADE COMMANDER:
CALVIN HART
4884 VICTORIA CHASE CT
JACKSONVILLE, FL 32257
(904) 730-0343
calvinhart@bellsouth.net



SONS OF UNION VETERANS - DEPARTMENT OF FLORIDA

ELECTED DEPARTMENT OFFICERS

COMMANDER....Michael E. Farrell / 321-676-8352
1952 Muirfield Way SE
Palm Bay, FL 32909
Email - llmitchell@c4dofsuvcw.org

SENIOR VICE COMMANDER....John M. Vaughn III, PCC
EMAIL - suvyankee1@aol.com
 
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EMAIL - dhoover2@gmail.com



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(VETERAN REMAINS RECOVERY)

Florida
 
Mike Donohoe
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"SIC SEMPER TYRANNIS,"

stephendare

October 15, 2014, 09:57:50 AM
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