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The Jaguars - NFL Relocations and the LA Stadium Plan

It's one of the most talked about topics at the water cooler - the Jaguars - and their ticket sales woes. It seems every national media outlet has had at least one writer take a shot at Jacksonville for the lack of ticket sales. Today, Metro Jacksonville continues its seven part series discussing the Jaguars and the Jacksonville Market, and how they compare to other NFL cities.

Published January 29, 2010 in Urban Issues      32 Comments    Open printer friendly version of this article Print Article


feature

An Overview of the Series

Part 1 – How Jacksonville became an NFL city
Part 2 – NFL Economics: What’s changed since 1995?
Part 3 – Jaguars on the Field: How do we compare?
Part 4 – Jacksonville and College Football
Part 5 – Jacksonville vs. Other Small Markets
Part 6 – NFL Relocations and the LA Stadium Plan
Part 7 – What does the future hold?


Since 1960, there have been quite a few NFL teams that have relocated.  At this point, most markets that have lost an NFL team have gotten a team back, either through expansion or relocation.  The reason for these moves?  Money.  Make no mistake, the NFL is a business, and like any business, you want to make it as profitable as you can.  If there is another city that would make the business more profitable, than the owner will consider it, especially if he isn't making money in his current market.  Now, let's take a look at each NFL relocation in the last 50 years.

1960– Chicago Cardinals move to St. Louis

The Chicago Cardinals at Comiskey Park in 1947

Primary Reason for Relocation: Fan Support

The Chicago Cardinals were the “second” team in Chicago to the Bears for a long time.  However, it turned for the worst in the 1950s, when the team started hemorrhaging money quickly.  Cardinals owner Violet Bidwell sought permission to relocate, and with the impending startup of the rival American Football League, St Louis was the agreed upon destination.

Replacement Franchise: None (Chicago is a one team market today)


1961– Los Angeles Chargers move to San Diego

Football at the LA Coliseum, the historic stadium that doesn't really hold any event well.  It's shaped wrong for baseball, and the field is too big for football.  Los Angeles tried to address the issue for the USC Trojans, by adding bleachers on part of the field and removing part of the main structures seats

After only one season in Los Angeles, the Chargers moved down south to San Diego.  Between the sharing of the LA Coliseum, trying to build a fan base in someone else’s house, and the fact that a legacy really wasn’t established, ownership felt that the move made sense.

Replacement Franchise: the Oakland Raiders, which moved to Los Angeles for the 1982 season.


1963 – Dallas Texans move to Kansas City

The Dallas Texans Logo, which was changed upon the move to Kansas City

Primary Reason for Relocation: Fan Support

In 1959, Lamar Hunt, AFL founder and owner of the Dallas Texans franchise, was having trouble competing against the NFL’s Dallas franchise, the Cowboys.  In 1963, he began to look for relocation options, and when the City of Kansas City promised to triple attendance and add seats at Municipal Stadium (home to the Kansas City Athletics baseball team), Lamar Hunt packed his bags and moved up the road.

Replacement Franchise: None (Dallas is a one team market today)


1982– Oakland Raiders move to Los Angeles

The Oakland-Alameda County Coliseum, home to both the Raiders and Athletics Baseball Team.  Both teams are currently shopping for new facilities.

Primary Reason for Relocation: Facility Issues

In 1980, Raiders Owner Al Davis tried to lobby the city of Oakland to make improvements to the Raiders’ Home, the Oakland-Alameda County Coliseum.  It didn’t go so well for Davis, and he signed a letter of intent to move the team to Los Angeles.  Despite the NFL’s disapproval, Davis went to court, won, and moved the Raiders to the Los Angeles Coliseum for the 1982 season.

Replacement Franchise: the Oakland Raiders, which moved BACK to Oakland for the 1995 Season


1984 – Baltimore Colts move to Indianapolis

The image long time Baltimore residents will never forget - the Mayflower moving company relocating their beloved Colts to Indianapolis

Primary Reason for Relocation: Facility Issues

In the 1970’s, Bob Irsay (the owner of the Baltimore Colts) was growing increasingly unhappy with his situation in Baltimore due to a variety of reasons. The main issue was the condition of their facility, Memorial Stadium, which they shared with the Baltimore Orioles Baseball Team. The stadium was built decades ago, and was in desperate need of renovation.  A city and state task force even reviewed the stadium, and found that the facility was woefully inadequate for either the Colts or Orioles, much less the two teams sharing the same space. Irsay talked to folks from Los Angeles, Memphis, Phoenix, Indianapolis, and Jacksonville, where we famously had 50,000 fans waiting in the Gator Bowl when Irsay came to town.  However, Indianapolis won out after building a brand new domed stadium before the team even committed to moving, and in what is arguably the most heart wrenching of all of the relocations, on March 29th, 1984, 13 trucks from Mayflower showed up, packed everything the team owned, and the Baltimore Colts were no more.

Replacement Franchise: The quasi-expansion Baltimore Ravens, which began play in 1996.  See below for an explanation.


1988 – St Louis Cardinals move to Phoenix

The Cardinals moved to Phoenix because of facility issues.  Little did they know that it would take them nearly 20 years to get that first-class facility that they sought.  University of Phoenix Stadium opened in 2006, and features America's first retractable field.  It slides out for sun and water during the week, and slides back in on gamedays.

Primary Reason for Relocation: Facility Issues

After the 1987 season, with the push for a new football-only facility turning futile (they had shared a stadium with the St Louis Cardinals Baseball Team), they announced plans to relocate to Phoenix, with a handshake promise of a new facility in the Phoenix area.  However, the Savings and Loan crisis proved to be much more powerful than a handshake, and the Cardinals ended up playing in Arizona State University’s Sun Devil Stadium for nearly 20 years before they got a facility of their own.

Replacement Franchise: The relocated Los Angeles Rams, which began play in 1995.

1995– Los Angeles Raiders move to Oakland

Primary Reason for Relocation: Facility Issues

In 1987 (just five years after moving to LA), Al Davis began the push for a new stadium for the Raiders.  Not only was the stadium not up to par with other NFL facilities, the surrounding neighborhood was so bad thqt it actually had an impact on attendance.  Despite multiple attempts at a new stadium (one attempt actually had one of the LA suburbs pay Al Davis $10 million to come to their city), it was never resolved, and Davis and company packed up, and went BACK up I-5 to Northern California, to the same facility that was unsuitable 15 years before.
Replacement Franchise: None

1995– Los Angeles Rams move to St. Louis

The Rams moved into Anaheim Stadium in 1979, which was expanded to accomodate football.  However, the expansion took a decent baseball facility, and made it a sub-par multi-use facility.
Primary Reason for Relocation: Facility Issues

In 1980, the Rams moved out of the LA Coliseum to Anaheim Stadium, home of the California Angels. To prepare for this, the City of Anaheim (a suburb of LA) added about 20,000 seats to Anaheim Stadium. However, the result was that a decent baseball facility became a sub-par facility for either baseball or football.  Furthermore, the Raiders move to LA in 1982 fractured the Rams’ stranglehold on the LA market, making it tougher to compete financially.  New Owner Georgia Frontiere (widow of the late Carroll Rosenbloom), was originally from St Louis, so it was no shock when she picked up on day, and left for St Louis.
Replacement Franchise: None

1996– Houston Oilers move to Tennessee

The Astrodome shortly after it opened in 1964.  Called "The Eighth Wonder of the World", the City of Houston is now trying to come up with a use for this vacant facility.

Primary Reason for Relocation: Facility Issues

Throughout the 1990’s, Houston Oilers owner Bud Adams was looking for a new facility to replace the aging Astrodome.  A new facility was being planned for the Astros baseball team, but they could not put together a plan for a new football stadium, and Adams shopped the team to Nashville, who built a new, riverfront stadium for the now-renamed Tennessee Titans

Replacement Franchise: The Houston Texans, which began play in 2002

1996– Cleveland Browns move to Baltimore (sort of)

Cleveland Stadium, during the Browns last game in 1995.  After this season, Browns Owner Art Modell became the most hated man in Ohio, and Cleveland Stadium was demolished.
Primary Reason for Relocation: Facility Issues, and a trigger-happy owner.

We've saved the most bizarre one for last.  Browns Owner Art Modell is probably the winner of the “blame the city because I’m an idiot” award.  In the 1970’s, Modell signed a deal with the City of Cleveland to redo the Cleveland Stadium lease.  As part of the lease, the Browns would get the revenue from the big money generators, such as the luxury boxes and advertising, despite the fact that they shared the stadium with the Cleveland Indians baseball team.  Modell was as happy as a pig in filth, so when the Indians and the Cleveland Cavaliers Basketball team invited him to be part of the Gateway Project, a public works project to build new facilities for the teams, he declined, thinking that he would continue to let the money roll in.  However, with the Indians moving out, so did 81 events a year at the facility, and the advertising and revenue that went with that.

Because of this, Modell places an issue on the ballot to raise $175 million for improvements to Cleveland Stadium.  The day before the vote, he announced that he had a deal to relocate to Baltimore.  The next day, in an effort to save the Browns, they overwhelming approved the measure.  After Modell kept pushing the relocation, Browns fans reacted violently, to the point that the fans in the “Dawg Pound” (a rowdy section in the end zone) literally threw everything that they had onto the field (including the bleachers).

After the 1995 season, the City of Cleveland, the City of Baltimore, Art Modell, and the NFL sat down, and worked out a compromise.  The Cleveland Browns Logo, name and legacy would remain in Cleveland, and a team would be established there with a new ownership group for the 1999 season, giving the City of Cleveland time to construct a new facility.  Art Modell would then be awarded an expansion franchise for the city of Baltimore, however, the NFL forced Modell to sell the team in 2000 because of the fact that he managed to lose money with the new team as well.

Replacement Franchise: After a three year hiatus, the Cleveland Browns resumed operations in 1999


The Los Angeles Stadium Proposal (photos courtesy of losangelesfootballstadium.com)

After reviewing 50 years worth of NFL relocations, one would be remiss to not also analyze the mother of all relocations coming in the next couple years - Los Angeles.  Over the years, multiple groups have tried to put together different proposals for a stadium, including a renovation of the LA Coliseum, a renovation of the Rose Bowl, or a new stadium.  

The leading proposal at this point is for a new facility built by Billionaire Ed Roski and his company, Majestic Realty, for a $800 million, 75,000 seat facility with all of the trimmings (luxury suites, club seats, things for companies to sponsor, etc).  The thing that makes this viable – it will be 100% privately funded.


At this point, the NFL is not likely to expand, which means that it will be a relocation of an existing franchise.  The ones mentioned the most are the Jaguars (whose lease ends in 2029), Buffalo Bills (2012), San Diego Chargers (2020, but they have an out period every year), Oakland Raiders (2013), San Francisco 49ers (2013), St Louis Rams (Variable between 2012 and 2014 subject to circumstances) and Minnesota Vikings (2011).

Which one makes the most sense?



It depends on the perspective.  All of the teams above have stadium issues except the Bills and Jaguars (the Bills are having revenue issues in a city losing people, and the Jaguars aren’t filling the stadium).  From a TV perspective, the Raiders make the most sense – the NFL would gain a team in the #2 TV market, and not lose a market (as Oakland and San Francisco share a market).  The Rams are rumored to be for sale behind the scenes. The Chargers ownership is friends with Roski.



On paper, the Jaguars are the most secure.  With that said, more seasons with an average attendance fewer than 50,000 will not help things.  While the lease is through 2029, if the team keeps drawing sub-par crowds, at some point it might make more sense to break the lease and pay a penalty than to lose money like they have been.


If Jaguar home games continue to have this many empty seats, then Los Angeles will become a real concern.

The most important thing in all of this: some poor city is going to lose their team to Los Angeles (it’s going to happen – 32 billionaires with no team in the #2 market in America are going to get impatient at some point).  Jaguars owner Wayne Weaver has said repeatedly that he won’t move the team to Los Angeles, a statement that he has never wavered from.  With that said, he will be 75 this year.  If we want to keep the team here, the future is in our hands.







32 Comments

jandar

January 29, 2010, 07:49:42 AM
Man, I feel like I repeat myself on every forum post online about the Jags moving to LA.
But here it is again.

==================
In 2002, the Jaguars and the City of Jacksonville extended the stadium lease to 2030.

There is a performance clause written into that lease that states that ALL home games be played in the stadium until 2030. This prevents Jacksonville from losing a home game to go play in London. If/when they do go, it will be as a visitor.

For the Jaguars (regardless of ownership) to break that lease requires:

1. The NFL to change its written policy for a team to break a stadium lease to move to a new city.

2. The Jags would have to open their books and prove to the city that they lost money for three straight years. (good luck with that, the NFLPA would have a field day knowing what an org makes/loses)

3. Pay back the City of Jacksonville the remainder of the lease agreement (around 50 million) in one lump check immediately upon termination of the lease.

4. Reimburse the city for lost parking revenue, ticket surcharges, and other things. This could total 200 million as well.

Wayne Weaver wrote that lease with the city in order to keep the Jaguars there. It was his idea to include the clauses for breaking the lease.

They can only get out of the money if they have a local judge say that the stadium has poor maintenance. (not likely, it just had a 33 million dollar update to get the SuperBowl a few years back)

If Wayne Weaver were to sell the team, (worth around 800 million, the new owner could move them, after paying another 250+ million in fees and broken contracts. Then spend what, another billion or so on a new stadium?

copperfiend

January 29, 2010, 08:21:34 AM
It's one of the most talked about topics at the water cooler - the Jaguars - and their ticket sales woes. Up to this point, the Jaguars have yet to even be close to selling out any of their home games, and most likely will not for the rest of the year.

You might want to update this part.

mtraininjax

January 29, 2010, 09:00:27 AM
Jandar - Good information, Ask Lake or one of the Admins to put your info at the top of every Jags post for possible move.

Clem1029

January 29, 2010, 09:24:17 AM
It still makes me want to spit bullets what Art *bleeping* Modell did to my Browns, and the city as a whole. The man deserves every single bit of bile that comes his way, and then some. There's not a single Browns fan anywhere that doesn't believe he has a special room in Hell reserved for him.

If the voters are ever dumb enough to put him in the Hall of Fame (which thankfully is becoming less and less likely with each passing year), induction day will be a riot like you've never seen - remember, the HoF is about an hour south of Cleveland, and still in Browns fan territory.

aaapolito

January 29, 2010, 10:57:43 AM
"All of the teams above have stadium issues except the Bills and Jaguars (the Bills are having revenue issues in a city losing people, and the Jaguars aren’t filling the stadium)."

This assertion regarding the Bills' stadium is not exactly true.  I recently attended a Bills game in Buffalo, NY, and Rich Stadium is a decaying facility.  It is severely out dated.

tufsu1

January 29, 2010, 10:58:39 AM
It still makes me want to spit bullets what Art *bleeping* Modell did to my Browns, and the city as a whole. The man deserves every since bit of bile that comes his way, and then some. There's not a single Browns fan anywhere that doesn't believe he has a special room in Hell reserved for him.

If the voters are ever dumb enough to put him in the Hall of Fame (which thankfully is becoming less and less likely with each passing year), induction day will be a riot like you've never seen - remember, the HoF is about an hour south of Cleveland, and still in Browns fan territory.

the folks in baltimore like him quite a bit though!

Clem1029

January 29, 2010, 11:05:44 AM
the folks in baltimore like him quite a bit though!
Which is why many people tend to shrug off all the hand-wringing that is associated with that "Mayflower truck in the snow" picture posted in the article. ;)

trigger

January 29, 2010, 11:05:46 AM
Just a little background, the Bidwells and the St. Louis Cardinals were driven out of St. Louis. Once the Bidwells/Cardinals left town, it took the St. Louis a brief period to plan, fund and construct the Edward Jones Dome (half the time it took the Arizona Cardinals to build a facility in that AZ) and entice the Rams out of LA. The Cardinals would still be in St. Louis and the Rams would still be in LA if it were not for Bill Bidwell's selfish, 15 year attempt to hold St. Louis hostage for a new stadium.

Steve

January 29, 2010, 11:45:05 AM
^Mostly true.  However, St Louis build the Edward Jones Dome thinking that they would be a shoe-in for the expansion team, but were denied.  The Rams thing only happened because LA couldn't put together a stadium plan.

Steve

January 29, 2010, 11:46:53 AM
This assertion regarding the Bills' stadium is not exactly true.  I recently attended a Bills game in Buffalo, NY, and Rich Stadium is a decaying facility.  It is severely out dated.

Yes, but the stadium is not their largest concern.  The biggest issue is the population loss.  Even if you built a state of the art facility with all the bells and whistles, you need people to spend money at those places.  With the loss of companies and population, there is less of a draw for that each year.

Steve

January 29, 2010, 11:53:08 AM
1. The NFL to change its written policy for a team to break a stadium lease to move to a new city.

2. The Jags would have to open their books and prove to the city that they lost money for three straight years. (good luck with that, the NFLPA would have a field day knowing what an org makes/loses)

3. Pay back the City of Jacksonville the remainder of the lease agreement (around 50 million) in one lump check immediately upon termination of the lease.

4. Reimburse the city for lost parking revenue, ticket surcharges, and other things. This could total 200 million as well.

Here's my thought:

Point 1 - Not hard to do, espeically if that relocation is surrounding LA and the TV contracts.

Point 2 - If they have 2 more years like this past year, it may be worth it to open the books.

Point 3 - Agreed, this might be tough, but it's around 50 million today.  It goes down each year.  It may become worth it if we have some more years like last year.

Point 4 - Again, this goes down over time.

Wayne Weaver wrote that lease with the city in order to keep the Jaguars there. It was his idea to include the clauses for breaking the lease.

They can only get out of the money if they have a local judge say that the stadium has poor maintenance. (not likely, it just had a 33 million dollar update to get the SuperBowl a few years back)

If Wayne Weaver were to sell the team, (worth around 800 million, the new owner could move them, after paying another 250+ million in fees and broken contracts. Then spend what, another billion or so on a new stadium?


Keep this in mind - I believe Wayne Weaver completely when he says he doesn't want to move the team.  My concern is that he will be 75 this year, and Ed Roski seems to have a decent plan for an LA stadium.  While it would be expensive, so is losing millions each year.

jeh1980

January 29, 2010, 01:44:55 PM
The Jaguars are not, I repeat, NOT going anywhere anytime soon!

Basstacular

January 29, 2010, 02:04:54 PM
Not sure if anyone has seen the update on Jaguars.com about tickets, but things are looking much better.  In the previous two years the jaguars sold 13 new season tickets and 0 new season tickets in Jan.  Compare that to the 1300 season tickets sold this Jan. with the hopes of reaching 2000 and it seems the community is rallying.  Of course, the big test will be the renewal rate of previous season ticket holders, but I am plenty optimistic with news like this.

And just to add my personal situation, I will be sitting in a block in section #205 with 13 other friends, six of us were renewals and the other 8 are friends who either once had season tickets and renewed or are new season ticket holders.

http://www.jaguars.com/news/article.aspx?id=8695

Also, like their idea of keeping a constant update on our ticket stauts, kind of like a counter I hope.  Anyways, just felt like passing along some good news to other Jag fans.

Debbie Thompson

January 29, 2010, 02:07:56 PM
So three teams - the Chargers, Raiders and Rams - all moved to LA, couldn't take LA-LA-Land, and moved out again.  LOL

Basstacular

January 29, 2010, 02:10:26 PM
Mark my words...The citizens of Jacksonville will support their team and you will see the LA Chargers in 2011.  The Chargers cannot get any help from the City to build a new stadium, Qualcomm where they currently play is falling apart and their stadium lease buyout shrinks from 53 million to 26 million after this upcoming season.

Of course I am a Jags homer and eternal optimist....

Wacca Pilatka

January 29, 2010, 02:45:50 PM
I renewed already and locked in for 3 years.  Most of the season ticket holders I know (not that I know very many, just my tailgate group) have done the same.  I think the renewal rate will be high because the group that was left this year was the broken glass Jaguar ticket buyers.

At this point I really hope no team moves to Los Angeles.  I can't in good conscience root for another team to move when I desperately want my team to stay where it is.  That'd be rooting for another group of dedicated fans to go through the same kind of agony we fear (though our would likely be greater since certain sports media personalities seemingly can't wait to do an end-zone dance over the corpse of pro football in Jacksonville).  The way the LA group is conducting itself just repulses me too--the arrogant presumptions that they can snap their fingers and lure a team, the dismissive condescension toward markets like Jacksonville and Buffalo, etc.  Not to mention the rumors that the LA group is employing a PR firm to demoralize Jacksonville fans and convince them a move is inevitable.  Uncorroborated, but it would explain some of the perpetual negativity on the jaguars.com message boards...

9a is my backyard

January 29, 2010, 09:16:07 PM
Very good article, particularly the conclusion. There's an interesting podcast on ESPN (http://sports.espn.go.com/espnradio/player?id=4478219) about the stadium issue in LA. The guest on the podcast said the venue could be profitable even of it was only used to host the super bowl every 3-4 years. LA has lost a number of franchises and the Jaguars, outside of their ticket sales and sub-par revenue generation from sponsorships and high-priced seats, are doing reasonably well. In reality, most teams had a tough year this season, Jacksonville was just hit particularly hard. I went to three games and the low attendance really hurt the atmosphere of the game. I went to the Rams game and the crowd seemed dead. In some ways it's a chicken-egg situation. I also went to th Colts game though, and it was a blast. I'm not even a huge football fan, but I'm considering buying season tickets as a result of the Colts game. I think (and hope) the Jags will be fine; we could even become a feel-good story if things keep improving as they appear to be.

heights unknown

January 29, 2010, 09:30:58 PM
Sorry folks, but the Jags aren't going anywhere.  We'll have a football team until America's nuked, so just relax y'all.

"HU"

coredumped

January 29, 2010, 10:18:29 PM
That last picture of our stadium is a bit unfair. It was obviously taken during the National Anthem, when a lot of people are still shuffling in, or are at the concession stands. Second, if it's from this year, it was a pre-season game. (Assuming by the few people wearing Bucs clothes).

Keith-N-Jax

January 29, 2010, 10:19:21 PM
I don't see why San Diego would risk the Charges leaving. Sure they have choked many times in the playoffs, but at least they get there consistently. As for the Jags a couple more good years of drafting and I think we will be ok. I think this season will be better.

Keith-N-Jax

January 29, 2010, 10:21:19 PM
Yes it was preseason. The other cities like picking on Jax it seems. Have you seen the articles talking about David being being voted to the pro bowl as if it were his fault the other QBs backed out.

reednavy

January 29, 2010, 10:28:09 PM
I don't see why San Diego would risk the Charges leaving. Sure they have choked many times in the playoffs, but at least they get there consistently.
However, what solution does the city have? They can't afford it at all, it just isn't looking good for the Chargers and hasn't for some time.

Ocklawaha

January 30, 2010, 01:12:00 AM
So three teams - the Chargers, Raiders and Rams - all moved to LA, couldn't take LA-LA-Land, and moved out again.  LOL

Wow debbie, I want some of whatever your smoking, it's painfully obvious my opium is no where near as powerful!!

As Jeh says, "MARK MY WORDS" (by the way, that's a quote from Oliver (Babe) Hardy, early Jax Movie Star) the teams that are going to start moving around in the next 10-20 years will nearly all be from the RUST BELT cities.
With their fortunes declining, population falling rapidly, infrastructure in shambles (making them even less attractive to teams, industry and residents) and their old "craft" professions exported to China, nobody is going to want to keep a dynamic team in CLEVELAND, DETROIT, BUFFALO, and if it weren't for some other very lucky curves, GREEN BAY, PHILADELPHIA, CINCINNATI and one NEW YORK team would be looking to bail too.

ANY businessman, in business for the long haul and big profits, regardless of industry, knows for a fact, the future is not north of the Mason Dixon Line.

LOOK AHEAD! LOOK SOUTH!


OCKLAWAHA

arthardie

February 02, 2010, 09:18:01 AM
In response to Jandar's post:

Those numbers posted (framed as formidable roadblocks to relocation) are realistically small potatoes compared to the revenue a successful NFL team can earn. Essentially, what seem like large hurdles for moving a team from its lease in Jacksonville, are barely even speed bumps. Consider that Mike Vick still has a $130 million contract. Moving the team from Jacksonville would only cost a few Mike Vicks. And when you consider that successful teams have operating incomes of between $55-100 million per year, then you see that fulfilling those monetary obligations linked to relocation are just a few seasons away from being completely reimbursed. Then consider the financial stability of the NFL, and you will see that lenders/investors would easily pony up the money to pay those relocations costs in order to realize the financial benefits of relocating a team to a more profitable environment.

So, in sum my response to Jandar is, what numbers seem big to us, are small in the eyes of businessmen seeking to maximize profits from one of the country's most valued franchise products. The stats mentioned in that above post are largely irrelevant. Ticket sales are still the most vital numbers concerning the Jaguars' future. The stadium costs mentioned at the end of that post are also a non-issue as many stadiums are government-subsidized (tax payer funded) and welcomed by citizens as general municipal improvements.

arthardie

February 02, 2010, 09:25:39 AM
And last but not least, read the quote below straight from the Times Union last year: "While the Jaguars have been unable to earn $5 million per year in naming rights, the Giants and Jets are expected to receive more than $20 million annually. The Cowboys are expected to earn close to $20 million in a deal."

Don't you think a team in L.A. could expect to also earn naming rights figures equivalent to NY and Dallas? So, now you play businessman. Where do you want your franchise? Struggling to earn anything for naming rights? Or potentially pocketing $20 million?

copperfiend

February 02, 2010, 09:26:58 AM
It's been a year and the Cowboys stadium is nameless.

jandar

February 02, 2010, 10:48:24 AM
In response to Jandar's post:

Those numbers posted (framed as formidable roadblocks to relocation) are realistically small potatoes compared to the revenue a successful NFL team can earn. Essentially, what seem like large hurdles for moving a team from its lease in Jacksonville, are barely even speed bumps. Consider that Mike Vick still has a $130 million contract. Moving the team from Jacksonville would only cost a few Mike Vicks. And when you consider that successful teams have operating incomes of between $55-100 million per year, then you see that fulfilling those monetary obligations linked to relocation are just a few seasons away from being completely reimbursed. Then consider the financial stability of the NFL, and you will see that lenders/investors would easily pony up the money to pay those relocations costs in order to realize the financial benefits of relocating a team to a more profitable environment.

So, in sum my response to Jandar is, what numbers seem big to us, are small in the eyes of businessmen seeking to maximize profits from one of the country's most valued franchise products. The stats mentioned in that above post are largely irrelevant. Ticket sales are still the most vital numbers concerning the Jaguars' future. The stadium costs mentioned at the end of that post are also a non-issue as many stadiums are government-subsidized (tax payer funded) and welcomed by citizens as general municipal improvements.

Mike Vick has returned some of that contract money, and is debt (and being sued) for the rest.

Regardless of money, if the contract was broken for whatever reason, the NFL still has a policy in place to prevent a team from breaking a contract to move cities. You say you study law in Orlando, you might want to focus on contract law. That is a bear of a subject, and the Wayne Weaver and the City of Jacksonville together wrote a good one to prevent the Jags from leaving anytime soon.

Jacksonville is being used as a smoke screen. Nothing more.

ac

February 02, 2010, 11:01:19 AM
Meanwhile, at the Team Teal function last night, the Jaguars announced over 1850 new season-ticket sales for the month of January.  Those are net new sales, not renewals.  Renewal invoices are going out right now.

Total combined January ticket sales for the previous 2 seasons? 13.

Of that 1850-plus sold, nearly a third opted for a three-year commitment.  Can't rest easy by any means, but this is an excellent start.

copperfiend

February 02, 2010, 12:30:38 PM
Great start for Boselli and his crew.

stjr

February 02, 2010, 07:11:23 PM
Quote
...nobody is going to want to keep a dynamic team in CLEVELAND, DETROIT, BUFFALO, and if it weren't for some other very lucky curves, GREEN BAY, PHILADELPHIA, CINCINNATI and one NEW YORK team would be looking to bail too.

Ock, I agree, some of these cities have demographic issues coming down the pike.  But, I am not sure all of them do.

Buffalo and Detroit seem to me to be the worst, anecdotally. Don't know much about Green Bay other than it is the smallest NFL market.  That the local citizens own the team may keep them there almost forever.

Cleveland may be a toss up but I wouldn't write them off so quickly.  After all, they managed to attract the Rock n' Roll Hall of Fame not too many years ago.  Cincy looks to me to still have a pulse.

Philly and New York, when you take in their suburbs, come across as very much alive and well.  I wouldn't think twice of putting them on this list.

BridgeTroll

February 04, 2010, 09:49:12 AM
The Packers are extremely unlikely to ever be sold or moved.  There is no profit in doing so...

Quote
Based on the original "Articles of Incorporation for the (then) Green Bay Football Corporation" put into place in 1923, if the Packers franchise were to have been sold, after the payment of all expenses, any remaining money would go to the Sullivan Post of the American Legion in order to build "a proper soldier's memorial." This stipulation was enacted to ensure the club remained in Green Bay and that there could never be any financial enhancement for the shareholders. At the November 1997 annual meeting, shareholders voted to change the beneficiary from the Sullivan-Wallen Post to the Green Bay Packers Foundation, which makes donations to many charities and institutions throughout Wisconsin.


This is a very interesting read BTW...

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Green_Bay_Packers

duvaldude08

February 19, 2010, 06:52:31 PM
As of today, per Jaguars.com, we have sold a little over 3,000 new season tickets so far. Keep it up!!!!
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