Tuesday, October 21, 2014
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
 

Evergreen Cemetery

Evergreen Cemetery is the oldest fully operating cemetery in Jacksonville, with the first burial occurring in 1881. The Evergreen Cemetery Association was organized in 1910 as a non-profit corporation by a number of people who had family or friends buried there.

Published October 23, 2008 in History      39 Comments    Open printer friendly version of this article Print Article


The cemetery is comprised of 170 acres and over 70,000 burials. When the cemetery opened, remains were moved there from a downtown area near State Street and from the Old City Cemetery. At one time there was a train depot at Evergreen for visitors from the city and holding vaults nearby awaiting bodies for burial.

The tag on this tree identifies its type.

Over the years, as families brought plants and trees to plant graveside, a large assortment of non-native plants have accumulated throughout the cemetery. The University of Florida has tagged all of the different species of plants and the cemetery had plans to also become an arboretum, but it was discovered that an arboretum and a cemetery do not have the same tax status, so the idea was dropped. Despite not having an official designation, the wide assortment of plants remain and every tree on the property has a numbered marker.

Notable Graves

Cora Crane 1868 - 1910

Proprietress of a Jacksonville resort, Crane was the wife of American novelist, poet and journalist Stephen Crane. Arriving in Jacksonville in 1895, she bought a dilapidated buidling in LaVilla called Hotel de Dreme, converting it from a boarding house to an elegant nightclub. (Featured in: Houston Street, Jacksonville's Red Light District).

Arthur G. Cummer (1894-1943)

Cummer was a prominent member of Jacksonville, active in the Jacksonville Chamber of Commerce and as a director of the Children's Home Society of St. Luke's Hospital. The Cummer family was known for its community spirit, and the family’s art collection and gardens laid the foundation for the Cummer Museum of Art and Gardens.

John Jackson Dickison b. March 27, 1816 d. August 23, 1902

Civil War Confederate Army Officer. Known as the "Swamp Fox", in 1862, he personally raised Company H of the 2nd Florida Cavalry, and was named its Captain and commander. In May 1864, he and 50 of his cavalrymen captured the Union steamer "Columbine", a maneuver which resulted in not a single loss to the Confederates. Days later, at Palatka, Florida, he and 30 troops pushed an invading 280-man Union battalion six miles back to the St. John's River, with casualties amounting to 72.

Ossian Bingley Hart b. January 17, 1821 d. March 18, 1874

Tenth governor of Florida, from January 7, 1873, to March 18, 1874. The first of Florida's governors to be born in the state, he was the son of a founder of Jacksonville. Although raised amid slaves on his father's St. Johns River plantation, Hart openly opposed secession and as a result endured many hardships during the Civil War. Hart took an active part in the reconstruction of both Jacksonville's and the state's government. Cause of death: pneumonia

Henry J. Klutho 1873 - 1964

Henry Klutho was a nationally recognized architect for his incorpation and promotion of the Prairie School style of Architecture first promulgated by Frank Loyde Wright. He arrived in Jacksonville just after the 1901 fire because he saw a wonderful opportunity to rebuild a city. His "prarie style" buildings still attest to the longevity of the architecture, for some have been restored and are still occupied today; the St. James Building, which houses City Hall, and the Morocco Temple are two.

Bessie Wicker Klutho - 1887 - 1966

Wife of Henry J. Klutho.

John Elie Mathews 1892 - 1955

His legal and civic career in Jacksonville lead to Chief Justice of the Supreme Court of Florida. His office was located in the Guaranty Trust and Savings Bank building at 101 East Bay Street (This building is on Metro Jacksonville's list of Most Endangered Historic Buildings). He promoted a bridge to Arlington from Jacksonville, which was named the Mathews Bridge. Built between 1951 and 1953, it was dedicated to Judge Mathews who had advocated for it since the 1930's. Before the bridge, the connection from Jacksonville to Arlington was accomplished by ferry.

Sarah L. Talley - 1907 - 1919

Daughter of prominent architect W.B. Talley, Sarah was killed by an unseen train when her mother drove the automobile they were riding in into its path. The accident occurred on Old Orange Park Road, now Roosevelt Blvd, near Fishweir Creek. There were 5 children between the ages of 12 and 14 years old in the car, plus Mrs. Talley. All were killed instantly except Sarah, who died in the hospital the next day. Closed storm curtains on the automobile was determined to be the reason Mrs. Talley did not see the oncoming train.

Notables not Pictured

Isaiah D. Hart
Hart is credited with founding Jacksonville in 1822 as a small town – originally named Cowford – on the north bank of the St. Johns River. His son, Ossian B. Hart, became the first Florida-born governor of the state.

Governor Napoleon Bonaparte Broward (1857-1910)
Raised in Jacksonville, Broward was the 19th governor of Florida, serving from 1905 to 1909. He also served as Duval County sheriff and in the Florida House of Representatives.

James McNair Baker b. July 20, 1821 d. June 20, 1892
CSA Senator. He was elected during the Civil War as a Senator from Florida to the Confederate States Senate, serving from 1862 until the Confederacy's demise in 1865. From 1865 to 1868 he served as an Associate Justice of the Florida State Supreme Court.

Napoleon Bonaparte Broward b. April 19, 1857 d. October 1, 1910
19th Florida Governor. He served as Governor of Florida from January 3, 1905 to January 5, 1909.

Nathan Philemon Bryan b. April 23, 1872 d. August 8, 1935
US Senator. He was elected as a Senator from Florida to the United States Senate, serving from 1911 to 1917.

William James Bryan b. October 10, 1876 d. March 22, 1908
US Senator. He was elected as a Senator from Florida to the United States Senate, serving from 1907 to 1908.

Walter Marion Chandler b. December 8, 1867 d. March 16, 1935
US Congressman. He was elected to represent New York's 19th District in the United States House of Representatives, serving from 1913 to 1919. amd 1921 to 1923. He was defeated in 1922 and 1924.


Charles 'Boobie' Clark b. November 8, 1950 d. October 25, 1988
Professional Football Player. He played in the National Football League as a running back for the Cincinnati Bengals from 1973 to 1978, and the Houston Oilers from 1979 to 1980. In his first year with the Bengals he played in 14 games, rushing for 988 yards and scoring 8 touchdowns on 254 carries, a performance that garnered him the 1973 Rookie of the Year award.

Joe Dobson b. January 20, 1917 d. June 23, 1994
Major League Baseball Player. A right-handed pitcher, he made his Major League debut with the Cleveland Indians in 1939 and spent 14 years in the Majors with a 137-103 record and 3.62 earned run average. His big break came when the Indians traded him to the Boston Red Sox along with Frank Pytlak and Odell Hale on December 12, 1940 for Gee Walker, Jim Bagby Jr. and Gene Desautels. He spent two years in the military in 1944 and 1945.

George Franklin Drew b. August 6, 1827 d. September 26, 1900
12th Florida Govenoer. Served as Governor of Florida from 1877 to 1881. His election as governor coincided with the end of the Reconstruction era in Florida. He drastically cut taxes and expenditures during his term of office and established the convict lease system as an economy measure. Later, he returned to the lumber business and at one time had eleven mills in operation. Drew was prominent in the business affairs of Jacksonville and served as first president of the city's board of trade.


Duncan Upshaw Fletcher b. January 6, 1859 d. June 17, 1936
US Senator for Florida, Years of Service 1909-1936, Democrat.

William Allen Bryan (1876-1908) and Nathan P. Bryan (1872-1935)
Both politicians, the Bryan brothers were U.S. senators from Florida who served as Democrats from 1907-1908 and 1911-1917, respectively. After Nathan Bryan’s term in the Senate, he returned to practicing law and became a judge in the U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals.

Noble Andrew Hull b. March 11, 1827 d. January 28, 1907
US Congressman. Served in the Confederate Army during the Civil War (1861-1865). Elected to represent Florida's 2nd District in the United States House of Representatives, serving from 1879 to 1881. Also served as Lieutenant Governor of Florida from 1877 to 1879, and as a Member of the Florida State House of Representatives in 1860.

William Sherman Jennings b. March 24, 1863 d. February 28, 1920
Florida Governor. Served as Governor of Florida from 1901 to 1905.

John Wellborn Martin b. June 21, 1884 d. February 22, 1958
Twenty-fourth governor of Florida from January 6, 1925, to January 8, 1929. He was mayor of Jacksonville for three terms (1917-24), and returned to that city after serving as governor. As governor during a land boom that attracted national attention, Martin encouraged a variety of progressive endeavors that outlasted the speculation. These included the building of highways throughout the state, financing public schools by direct state appropriations, and furnishing free textbooks to all pupils.


James Piper Taliaferro  b. September 30, 1847 d. October 6, 1934
US Senator. Served as a United States Senator from Florida from 1899 to 1911. He was defeated in 1910. During the Civil War (1861-1865), he served in the Confederate Army.

William Harold 'Bill' Terry b. October 30, 1898 d. January 9, 1989
Hall of Fame Major League Baseball Player.

Adrian Zabala Sr. b. August 26, 1916 d. January 4, 2002
Major League Baseball Player. Born Adrian (Rodriguez) Zabala. He was a pitcher for the 1945 and 1949 New York Giants. He made his major league debut on August 11, 1945 defeating the St. Louis Cardinals ten to one. He appeared in 26 games during his brief two year major league career, winning four games and losing seven. Prior to joining the Giants he pitched in the Mexican League where he led the league with a 2.74 earned run average. He was inducted into the Cuban Baseball Hall of Fame in 1984.

Photo Tour














































































   
Photos by Daniel Herbin







39 Comments

soxfan

October 23, 2008, 07:13:55 AM
Very nice pictures. Thank You!! Along with some friends we took our kids on the cemetery tour this past weekend. It was great. I noticed that you have alot of pics of headstones that were not on the tour. Is there a list somewhere of other notables that are buried there? My daughters and I would like to go looking for them. That is a great cemetery with an enormous amount of history. There are alot of beautiful markers there as seen through your pics.

Driven1

October 23, 2008, 08:28:50 AM
very cool!

fsujax

October 23, 2008, 09:05:00 AM
I thought Klutho would have had a better headstone than that. neat pictures.

David

October 23, 2008, 09:42:19 AM
I have two generations of my family buried there. It's a pretty nice cemetery, very scenic. Watch out for the locals though, they're a buncha stiffs, heyooooo!!!!

Old city cemetery by downtown dates back to the 1850's I believe but it's been out of operation for quite a while.

thelakelander

October 23, 2008, 09:42:44 AM
Klutho was not popular when he died.  I've heard in the past that less than 10 people attended his funeral.

Jason

October 23, 2008, 10:35:32 AM



Any relation Ock?

Driven1

October 23, 2008, 10:44:38 AM
Klutho was not popular when he died.  I've heard in the past that less than 10 people attended his funeral.
why?

fsujax

October 23, 2008, 11:25:20 AM
what timing.....there has been a shooting at the cemetary according to Firstcoastnews.com

Coolyfett

October 23, 2008, 12:44:42 PM
I thought Klutho would have had a better headstone than that. neat pictures.

Klutho died broke. Ive read that he was also divorced from the wife in the other picture.

Cool to know who the Mathews Bridge is named after.

Cora Crane was a Madam, she had plenty of hoes!!

Would have been cool to see Ike Hart's grave...no flicks on that?

Lunican

October 23, 2008, 01:09:15 PM
Evergreen is Jacksonville's densest neighborhood. 70,000 bodies in a quarter square mile.

BridgeTroll

October 23, 2008, 01:13:44 PM
And not a high rise in sight... :)

Wrangler of Space

October 23, 2008, 01:40:51 PM
No knocking UrbanJacksonville, but I could not believe that this site was not mentioned in the latest edition of Folio's BoJ.

Thank you so much for this website.  It is truly one of the highlights of my work day.  The articles are very interesting and the pictures are very well done.  Keep it up!

Ocklawaha

October 23, 2008, 04:54:49 PM
Captain J.J. Dickison's funeral was the largest in the history of the State of Florida. If I have my numbers straight, it was attended by 80,000+ citizens. I don't know if that record still holds but he was certainly respected by a great majority of Floridians.

As far as I can find, the largest ever in the South, perhaps the nation, was President JEFFERSON DAVIS of the Confederate States of America. He was laid to rest at New Orleans and the funeral procession extended all the way to Richmond, Virginia, and took days and days to make it's way to the Crescent City.


OCKLAWAHA
DEO VINDICE!

Doctor_K

October 23, 2008, 05:00:27 PM
Evergreen is Jacksonville's densest neighborhood. 70,000 bodies in a quarter square mile.
And not a high rise in sight... :)
Underground Arcology, Sim-City style.  Giggity-giggity.   ;D

On a more serious note, this is yet another piece of beautimous that needs to find a larger audience.  Jacksonville desperately needs to embrace its history.

GatorShane

October 23, 2008, 06:19:58 PM
I also took the tour this past weekend. Very cool!

RiversideGator

October 23, 2008, 06:34:55 PM
Great photos.  Thanks for the tour.  I have many relatives who are buried in Evergreen so I frequently visit.  It is obviously open to the public and is a very peaceful and relaxing place.  I would recommend everyone to go for a drive/walk through the cemetery.

blizz01

October 23, 2008, 06:49:52 PM
OOOH - the nasty irony of today's story/post(s) - considering it was the first time I'd heard of this place:

Quote
Jacksonville police investigating Wednesday’s double domestic killing shot a suspect armed with an assault rifle at Evergreen Cemetery on North Main Street.

http://news.jacksonville.com/justin/2008/10/23/jacksonville-police-shoot-suspect-22nd-of-the-year/

Ocklawaha

October 23, 2008, 06:55:04 PM
Quote
Any relation Ock?

Would be of course, but the line probably crosses in 1600's in England. I have the genealogy back to 1206 and two major migrations got the family here. The Northern Family comes across on the Mayflower as a bond-servant. Within a couple of years he was free (paid his bond) and had become County Recorder etc... During the War of Yankee Aggression, Col. William Ambrose Mann, was an engineer in the Yankee army. At the end of the war he moved to Mobile, Alabama, designed the first rail car compartments and operated a large empire of sleeping cars that would become the PULLMAN Company. His family is scattered across Florida and the Deep South.

My part of the family were small plantation owners which migrated into Virginia. once owned 10,000 acres in what is now West Virginia when it was still VIRGINIA. In fact the home was near the Morgantown Airport (today) they migrated westward to Clarksville, Tennessee, then on to northeast Arkansas before the War of Yankee Aggression. When war broke out my Great Grandfather joined the regular Confederate Army of Tennessee, while my uncle Sanford joined with Quantrail. This branch of the family is throughout the Midwest, Oklahoma, and Southwest as far as California. It's the tree this monkey swings from!


OCKLAWAHA

RiversideGator

October 23, 2008, 10:43:28 PM
OOOH - the nasty irony of today's story/post(s) - considering it was the first time I'd heard of this place:

Quote
Jacksonville police investigating Wednesday’s double domestic killing shot a suspect armed with an assault rifle at Evergreen Cemetery on North Main Street.

http://news.jacksonville.com/justin/2008/10/23/jacksonville-police-shoot-suspect-22nd-of-the-year/

It doesnt sound like this was within Evergreen or had anything to do with the cemetery.  There is Main Street running outside the Cemetery and various residential neighborhoods surrounding it.  And of course the Cemetery is physically closed at nights and the gates locked.

blizz01

October 23, 2008, 11:01:49 PM
So is Evergreen Cemetery more of an "area" of town?  (just to clarify)

Driven1

October 23, 2008, 11:13:11 PM
Quote
Any relation Ock?

Would be of course, but the line probably crosses in 1600's in England. I have the genealogy back to 1206 and two major migrations got the family here. The Northern Family comes across on the Mayflower as a bond-servant. Within a couple of years he was free (paid his bond) and had become County Recorder etc... During the War of Yankee Aggression, Col. William Ambrose Mann, was an engineer in the Yankee army. At the end of the war he moved to Mobile, Alabama, designed the first rail car compartments and operated a large empire of sleeping cars that would become the PULLMAN Company. His family is scattered across Florida and the Deep South.

My part of the family were small plantation owners which migrated into Virginia. once owned 10,000 acres in what is now West Virginia when it was still VIRGINIA. In fact the home was near the Morgantown Airport (today) they migrated westward to Clarksville, Tennessee, then on to northeast Arkansas before the War of Yankee Aggression. When war broke out my Great Grandfather joined the regular Confederate Army of Tennessee, while my uncle Sanford joined with Quantrail. This branch of the family is throughout the Midwest, Oklahoma, and Southwest as far as California. It's the tree this monkey swings from!


OCKLAWAHA


very cool!  wish i could go back that far with my family.  can anyone do this?  how did u find it all out?

Ocklawaha

October 24, 2008, 01:33:43 AM
Sometime I'll get to meet up with you and I'll give you some starting points. First and very important, get every relation to give you dates, names, DOB, locations, towns, states, countys. Call on every Aunt - Uncle - Parents - Grand Parents or beyond if available. Anyone wanting to do this, just write me here and I'll tell you what to do. Usually the department of vital records will send you the official birth, marriage, death certificates.  Once you drive it back into the mid 1800's, it really becomes easier, as the family tends to become so compact, there are often complete records available for the reading.

It's fun too, on my mothers side, I'm directly decended from Robert Bruce and Wallace of Scotland. How cool is that, (not that it means a thing to us here in Florida) but I was asked to join something called "THE ROYAL BRUCE SOCIETY," sounded impressive, but never did it.


OCKLAWAHA

second_pancake

October 29, 2008, 04:26:21 PM
Guess what, Ock?  You and I are related!  I too am a descendent of Robert Bruce on my mother's side.  Weird.

RiversideGator

October 29, 2008, 05:31:21 PM
So is Evergreen Cemetery more of an "area" of town?  (just to clarify)

There are neighborhood to the south, east and north of the cemetery and there is an Evergreen Avenue.  I dont know what the exact names of the neighborhood are though.  This area might be considered Dinsmore (?).

thelakelander

October 29, 2008, 05:40:48 PM
The overall area is known as Metro North.  The historic neighborhood of Panama Park is to the north and Brentwood is to the west.

RiversideGator

October 29, 2008, 05:47:35 PM
Brentwood is the right name for most of the area.  Dinsmore is a totally different area.  The Metro North area is a new designation designed to improve the image of the area.

Ocklawaha

October 29, 2008, 08:56:05 PM
Quote
Guess what, Ock?  You and I are related!  I too am a descendent of Robert Bruce on my mother's side.  Weird.

You'd be amazed at how many people we both are probably related to. I love it, it's just too cool. So shall we meet at one of the Tuesday Meetings and have a couple of cold ones - To Cousins of course!

OCKLAWAHA

second_pancake

October 30, 2008, 09:31:36 AM
Wish I could, but alas, I'm in Texas these days.  Quite a difference from Jacksonville.  There are definitely things Jax could learn from some of the cities here, but then there are things about Jax that I really miss.

thelakelander

October 30, 2008, 09:36:19 AM
Care to name a few?  What do you like about Texas and miss about Jax?

second_pancake

October 30, 2008, 12:02:44 PM
Likes:

  • Activities - LOTS of things to do, even in the small towns and you know about them all because they're advertised in the papers, on tv, on the radio....a major station here was advertising the Rocky Horror Picture Show live production taking place at the Plano Community Theatre.  When's the last time you ever heard someone on a Jax radion station talking about a play at the San Marco Theatre or some small event taking place in Springfield?
  • Mass Transit - We have the DART in Dallas which extends well beyond Dallas and connects historic areas like Carrollton (opening early next year), Plano and Frisco, and connects to a commuter rail called the TRE which takes you into Fort Worth and the cities in-between
  • Sense of Pride - Namely in Fort Worth.  The city knows its history and completely embraces it.  It is not uncommon to see a guy or gal riding their horse directly into downtown.  The Stockyards area especially is as western as they come (and I DO mean "western" not redneck...iron-pressed wranglers and polished belt-buckles).  Fort Worth has markers and tourist information where they talk very openly about "Hell's Half-Acre" which was a red-light district type area with gambling, drinking and brothels.  The Stockyards has an area where they've recreated that type of night-life (less the brothels), as well as real rodeo shows every single weekend.  It's really nice to see a place not looking to take their queue from other places, but to have done research on their own history, what made them who they are and be completely unashamed and PROUD.
Things I DON'T like:
  • Lack of History - With the exception of a few small areas and the major areas, Dallas and Fort Worth, North Texas is relatively new...most places having become established and recognized cities only in the 50's and 60's so there aren't a lot of quaint historic areas like we have in Jax with Avondale, Riverside, Springfield, San Marco, etc.  The only place here that we really like is Grapevine (a lot like a busier Fernandina Beach), but the historic homes are only about 20.
  • McMansions - This kind of goes hand-in-hand with the lack of history thing because these McMansions (homes in excess of 3000 sq ft crammed into a small residential neighborhood) are usually replacing historic homes.  It seems people are more interested in having the biggest and newest rather than preserving and restoring.  When the house is in a designated historic area, people can get around the law of having to restore the previous property by tearing it down to the foundation and just building on top of it.  Of course, no one sees the foundation.
  • Roadways - There are far too many interstates here.  There is an interstate called 35W and one called 35E but they run north and south, not east and west.  And when you travel a route one way, you can't simply retrace your route and go back the same way.  For instance, I took I-183 East to I-30 East into Dallas so to go home, I got onto I-30 West and was thinking I'd be able to get back onto I-183 but noooo.  It was nowhere in sight.  Instead, the interstate split off to take I-635 North or I-635 South.  I ended up in Plano...an hour and 15 minutes from home.  The interstates are also smaller than JTB.  There are fewer lanes (2 on each side divded by a concrete barrier) and the lanes seem tighter...closer together.  They also don't like to use painted lines, but rather, big white raised dots...or yellow dots.  It's really hard to understand where you are and where you're going.
  • Horrible Drivers - It might be because of the tight lanes, all the dots and the confusion about where to go, but every time of every day, someone gets into a major wreck on the interstate and the entire highway closes down...yes, even the lanes in the opposite direction.  The drivers are infuriatingly SLOW!!!  If the speed limit is 40, they go 30-35 mph...in the left lane.  On the interstate, they drive no faster than 55 mph.  Seriously, North Texas transplants to Jax would have a freakin heart attack driving I-95 north into downtown...especially at the Prudential/Riverside/Main St. cluster.
So, all-in-all I would say, if Jax could have the North Texas entertainment and the pride of history it couldn't be beat...well, ok, we'd have to buy some nice Wranglers, shiny new cowboy boots as well as teach manners to all the rednecks, THEN we'd really have something ;D

Lunican

March 28, 2010, 01:01:08 PM
Quote
Come see a grave view of history featuring entertaining dramas of Jacksonville history, all to raise funds for worthy causes. The Port of Jacksonville and Orange Park Pilot clubs is acting up again with the 11th tour of Tales of Our City, April 24-25, 2010 at one of Jacksonville’s oldest burial grounds, Evergreen Cemetery.

http://www.pilotclub.org/TOC.html

http://www.facebook.com/group.php?gid=341677373003&ref=nf

LPBrennan

March 28, 2010, 03:27:58 PM
Mention was made of the railroad depot that once was at Evergreen. That was on the original Fernandina & Jacksonville line that is still there. But there was also a streetcar line that ran along the southeastern boundary of the cemetery as well. The Phoenix Park carline ran  along 8th to Phoenix (then Fisher) to 24th, then to Evergeen Avenue, past the cemetery to Phoenix Park and terminated near the Cummer Mill. Streetcar companies usually had a line to or past a cemetery, as it was a sure source of revenue until the automobile became common. Some of them had cars designed as hearses, but Jacksonville never had that luxury.

Ocklawaha

March 28, 2010, 06:29:55 PM
Hey Cuz

The mass transit in Dallas-Ft.Worth is great and getting better, Fort Worth with BOTH depots preserved and in use, Dallas with Union Station right at the foot of downtown. Fort Worth going Streetcar and Dallas LRT headed to the airport... Ahhh

I would respectively disagree with the history aspect. The history is rich and as deep as Florida (I know OUCH!) but since the Spanish were led off on the goose chase for Eldorado by the natives, it has been something to watch. Hell's half acre? Did you know Hell's Fringe was in Oklahoma? How about the Red River? Did you know The Prairie Dog Town Fork of the Red, was accidentally used as the official border around Oklahoma Statehood? That gave the whole of Southwest Oklahoma to Texas! At least until the Okies went wild and occupied the bridges over the main or legal channel with their National Guard Troops, the governor collecting the tolls! Did you know Dallas and Fort Worth were the winter grounds for the Confederate Armies in Missouri's border wars? Not only my Great Uncle, but the James Boys, Daltons, Youngers, Archie Clement, Bill Anderson, William Quantrill, Sam and Belle Starr, Doc Holiday... Need we more?? Did you know Belle busted up a card game being played by every famous or infamous western lawmen, by coming in an upstairs window. She had two loaded 44's and cleaned up the table telling the boys to strip naked... "You know boys four four's beats anything on the table!" Go out to the local historical society and the regional museums, you will be wowed. 

PROUD? Oh hell, these families survived the dust bowl, they are tough as nails and put us to shame in pride.

McMansions, couldn't agree more, the north side of OKC, Edmond up through Kicking Bird is the same way, as is Broken Arrow and Skitook.

The little white bumps on the roadways are actually an improvement over white lines, they can even be illuminated. On a dark as surup tornadic stormy night, take a short drive and notice how they are above the water...  Just stay out of the arroyos.

As for slow Texas Drivers? WTF? I don't know where you found them, my experience is out in the open range those big pickup trucks will blast past at 100+... Texas had "Open Speed" until recently.

The biggest difference I ever noticed was a strong clique culture. Maybe because of the traditional isolation, persecution during the depression, whatever, if you are not from Texas or Oklahoma, you will NEVER BE FROM THEM. An old Ozark yarn tells of two ancient men on the front porch watching the funeral of a friend pass by the house. The first old man say's "There goes old Luke, lived here all his life he was really one of the boys..." The second old man cut him off and said "He most certainly was NOT! His family moved him here when he was 3 months old!"

When Okie's or Texans speak of how friendly they are, they simply mean, welcome, do your business and get the hell away from us. That single trait makes us the superior place to live.


OCKLAWAHA

Ocklawaha

March 28, 2010, 06:41:00 PM
Mention was made of the railroad depot that once was at Evergreen. That was on the original Fernandina & Jacksonville line that is still there. But there was also a streetcar line that ran along the southeastern boundary of the cemetery as well. The Phoenix Park carline ran  along 8th to Phoenix (then Fisher) to 24th, then to Evergeen Avenue, past the cemetery to Phoenix Park and terminated near the Cummer Mill. Streetcar companies usually had a line to or past a cemetery, as it was a sure source of revenue until the automobile became common. Some of them had cars designed as hearses, but Jacksonville never had that luxury.


One of the very few preserved Funeral Cars, The Descanso (translates = "to rest") resides in a museum. It really is a rolling "high church". Note the coffin door under the small round window.

The jury is still out on the "Funeral Car" of Jacksonville Traction. I met with the wife of the late president of the company last week and Betty was of a mind that there WAS such a car. Did you know our system was the most advanced and had some of the best cars in the Southeast? We even had a streetcar school on Riverside Avenue in Brooklyn, near where the TU is today. I have many of the builders photos and Jacksonville bought over 100 cars from many different companies.  Brill, St. Louis, Cincinnati, Jewett etc... all there. Ortega Traction brought some shorty Interurban style cars to the fleet. There is almost certainly a car remaining somewhere in Jacksonville, hidden in a house, or back yard, used as a shed, or patio room, who knows? I have heard over and over about cars in San Marco, but nobody seems to know where they are.


OCKLAWAHA

thelakelander

March 28, 2010, 07:22:40 PM
Mention was made of the railroad depot that once was at Evergreen. That was on the original Fernandina & Jacksonville line that is still there. But there was also a streetcar line that ran along the southeastern boundary of the cemetery as well. The Phoenix Park carline ran  along 8th to Phoenix (then Fisher) to 24th, then to Evergeen Avenue, past the cemetery to Phoenix Park and terminated near the Cummer Mill. Streetcar companies usually had a line to or past a cemetery, as it was a sure source of revenue until the automobile became common. Some of them had cars designed as hearses, but Jacksonville never had that luxury.

Here is an image of Jacksonville Traction Car #168 on the Phoenix Park line.  It was named "Phoenix" after the city rose from the ashes of the 1901 fire.



Bill Ectric

March 29, 2010, 10:15:43 AM
Klutho was not popular when he died.  I've heard in the past that less than 10 people attended his funeral.
why?


From Wikipedia:
Later generations in Jacksonville did not appreciate the creativity and style of his designs. His contributions to the rebirth of the city were mostly ignored, except by his colleagues. On this, he quoted Desiderius Erasmus: "In the land of the blind, a one-eyed man is king." Klutho lived to be 91, but was flat broke and his later years were difficult. Following his death, much of his work was razed or "renovated".[2] However, in the mid-1970's, a number of his creations were added to the National Register of Historic Places, assuring their preservation:

Dyal-Upchurch Building
Florida Baptist Building
Old Jacksonville Free Public Library (a/k/a Carnegie Library)
Morocco Temple
St. James Building (now the Jacksonville City Hall)
Thomas V. Porter House
Alexander St. Clair-Abrams House
Henry John Klutho House the architect's residence

devlinmann

March 29, 2010, 11:18:07 AM
wasn't klutho also a film producer?

devlinmann

March 29, 2010, 11:18:54 AM
"The legacy of Henry John Klutho lies not only in the buildings he left behind. He also was a nationally recognized visionary and an artist who chose to exercise his gifts in this sleepy Southern town. He was an urban planner, a major force in Jacksonville's movie industry, an inventor, a philosopher whose voice often went unheard. His architectural work remains as a brilliant part of one of America's greatest architectural movements."

from
http://www.jacksonville.com/tu-online/stories/022199/cel_1p9kluth.html

Sassy poe

February 26, 2011, 07:55:54 PM
Quote



So, all-in-all I would say, if Jax could have the North Texas entertainment and the pride of history it couldn't be beat...well, ok, we'd have to buy some nice Wranglers, shiny new cowboy boots as well as teach manners to all the rednecks, THEN we'd really have something ;D

 >:( 
I just found this lovely cemetery and your post ruined it. I would think after all of the above comparisons you didn't need to add the negative about teaching manners to "rednecks" I was born and raised in Texas. I have seen all of the things you mentioned. That does not make Texas any better or any worse than any other state. You sound pompous and arrogant, in need of the some of the manners you mentioned.

I also think Ocklawaha handled your putdown well, kudos to him!
View forum thread
Welcome Guest. You must be logged in to comment on this story.

What are the benefits of having a MetroJacksonville.com account?
  • Share your opinion by posting comments on stories that interest you.
  • Stay up to date on all of the latest issues affecting your neighborhood.
  • Create a network of friends working towards a better Jacksonville.
Register now
Already have an account? Login now to comment.