Author Topic: 2030 Mobility Plan: Development Zones  (Read 5094 times)

Metro Jacksonville

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2030 Mobility Plan: Development Zones
« on: July 16, 2010, 04:12:46 AM »
2030 Mobility Plan: Development Zones



To ensure the creation of a successful multimodal transportation network, the incorporation of complementing land use objectives is a critical objective. Since our community is diverse in terms of neighborhood characteristics, age, building fabric, population density and needs, a location-based approach to integrating mobility and land use is imperative.

Today Metro Jacksonville takes a look at the 2030 Mobility Plan's proposed location-based Land Use and Transportation Connection areas, which are described as "Development Zones"


Full Article
http://www.metrojacksonville.com/article/2010-jul-2030-mobility-plan-development-zones

Doctor_K

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Re: 2030 Mobility Plan: Development Zones
« Reply #1 on: July 16, 2010, 08:37:05 AM »
So is this going to be adopted/looked at by the right people, or is this another (brilliantly done) MJ OpEd piece?

One would hope for the former...
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thelakelander

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Re: 2030 Mobility Plan: Development Zones
« Reply #2 on: July 16, 2010, 10:22:57 AM »
The former. It's being evaulated right now by the city.
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Doctor_K

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Re: 2030 Mobility Plan: Development Zones
« Reply #3 on: July 16, 2010, 02:16:03 PM »
Outstanding.
"Imagination is more important than knowledge. For while knowledge defines all we currently know and understand, imagination points to all we might yet discover and create."  -- Albert Einstein

Captain Zissou

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Re: 2030 Mobility Plan: Development Zones
« Reply #4 on: July 16, 2010, 02:25:09 PM »
Does this plan have any teeth that will prevent sprawl, or is it another study that will get tossed aside?

fsujax

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Re: 2030 Mobility Plan: Development Zones
« Reply #5 on: July 16, 2010, 02:46:02 PM »
This plan will hopefully be the funding mechanism that is so badly needed for streetcars.

thelakelander

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Re: 2030 Mobility Plan: Development Zones
« Reply #6 on: July 16, 2010, 03:49:58 PM »
Does this plan have any teeth that will prevent sprawl, or is it another study that will get tossed aside?

Here are the teeth.  

Quote
Florida's Community Renewal Act (Senate Bill 360, SB 360), adopted in 2009, amended the Growth Management Act by removing state-mandated transportation concurrency requirements in areas designated as Transportation Concurrency Exception Areas or TCEAs.  Resulting from the definition of a "dense urban land area" or DULA provided within SB 360, the City of Jacksonville has been designated a TCEA. As outlined in Senate Bill 360, within two years after a TCEA becomes effective, local governments are required to amend their local comprehensive plans to include "land use and transportation strategies to support and fund mobility within the exception area, including alternative modes of transportation."

Local comprehensive plans must also comply with 163.3177, F.S., which requires the adoption of strategies to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and promote energy-efficient land use patterns. Pursuant to SB 360 and 163.3177, F.S., the City of Jacksonville Planning and Development Department has prepared a draft 2030 Mobility Plan.  

There are two chief components to the mobility planning approach, the draft 2030 Mobility Plan and the supporting 2030 Multimodal Transportation Study (January 2010). The purpose of this dual approach is to build upon existing policies through the adoption of land use and transportation policies that support mobility, in partnership with the effective application of a new transportation improvement and mitigation funding mechanism.

http://www.coj.net/Departments/Planning+and+Development/Community+Planning/Mobility+Plan.htm

You can't achieve any of the goals above by pushing the same unsustainable type of infrastructure solutions we've been selling our souls to for the last 50 years.
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lewyn

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Re: 2030 Mobility Plan: Development Zones
« Reply #7 on: July 16, 2010, 05:00:20 PM »
None of this looks like "teeth" to me.  A city or county can issue plans screaming to high heaven about how they plan to reduce greenhouse gases, but then when you read the fine print its back to the same old Outer Beltways and road widenings. 

thelakelander

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Re: 2030 Mobility Plan: Development Zones
« Reply #8 on: July 16, 2010, 06:00:44 PM »
Except two things. 

1.) This is a state mandate, not something cooked up locally.

2.) Outer Beltways and road widenings don't reduce greenhouse gas emissions, diversify transportation modes or support sustainable land uses.  Thus, such a single focused plan does not comply with the goals of SB 360. 

With that said, people claim they want change.  This seems like a pretty good opportunity to put our money where our mouth's are.
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tufsu1

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Re: 2030 Mobility Plan: Development Zones
« Reply #9 on: July 16, 2010, 07:47:15 PM »
There are lots of things in state statute that get ignored....for example, the outer beltway is already shown in local comp. plans so the new greenhouse gas rules won't effect it much.

I'm concerned that the cost differential in the Mobility Plan between the urban core areas and the rural fringe isn't enough to truly encourage infill development....that said, I've also heard that developers think the mobility fees are too high...so time will tell.

I met with FDOT central Office staff today in Tallahassee....they are well aware of Jax.'s proposed plan...and want to use it as a model for other areas around the state

thelakelander

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Re: 2030 Mobility Plan: Development Zones
« Reply #10 on: July 16, 2010, 07:55:19 PM »
Although nothing is set in stone, my guess is that it will pass in some form.  That alone is a huge accomplishment for our community.  My hope is that the transit, bike and ped projects don't get taken or bumped out of the initial five year plan.
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Fallen Buckeye

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Re: 2030 Mobility Plan: Development Zones
« Reply #11 on: July 17, 2010, 02:28:48 PM »
Can you explain what a mobility fee is?

tufsu1

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Re: 2030 Mobility Plan: Development Zones
« Reply #12 on: July 17, 2010, 02:48:46 PM »
A mobility fee is a fee assessed to new development to mitigate its traffic impacts...in the case of Jax, it will be based on the number of new trips and the average distance of those trips (that's what the zones are for)....right now, the plan proposes a fee of about $400-$600 per daily trip depending on location.

For comparison, a single family house generates about 10 trips/day...so the mobility fee in the urban zones would be around $4,000

A shopping center generates about 40 trips/day per 1000 square feet...so a 50,000 square foot grocery store in the urban zones would pay about $800,000
« Last Edit: July 17, 2010, 02:52:02 PM by tufsu1 »

heights unknown

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Re: 2030 Mobility Plan: Development Zones
« Reply #13 on: July 17, 2010, 03:10:01 PM »
http://photos.metrojacksonville.com/Transit/Jacksonville-2030-Mobility/Executive-Summary-FiguresPage4/827039031_ycPBN-M.jpg

Assuming that the area in green in the above photo is the present populated area of the so called "urban" area of the City, does anyone know what the population is in that area?  I know we would probably have to make a population count of all zip code areas to come to a close, near accurate figure, but if anyone knows, please let me know.  Great post y'all.

Assuming that if we had not consolidated, and Jax would have annexed most or all of the area in green, whatever the population is in that area is probably what our "city proper" population would be today.

"HU"
« Last Edit: July 17, 2010, 03:13:18 PM by heights unknown »
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Fallen Buckeye

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Re: 2030 Mobility Plan: Development Zones
« Reply #14 on: July 17, 2010, 03:51:20 PM »
Thanks. That's about what I thought it might be. Sounds like a good idea. Especially if this were paired with smart zoning and build code regulations.

A mobility fee is a fee assessed to new development to mitigate its traffic impacts...in the case of Jax, it will be based on the number of new trips and the average distance of those trips (that's what the zones are for)....right now, the plan proposes a fee of about $400-$600 per daily trip depending on location.

For comparison, a single family house generates about 10 trips/day...so the mobility fee in the urban zones would be around $4,000

A shopping center generates about 40 trips/day per 1000 square feet...so a 50,000 square foot grocery store in the urban zones would pay about $800,000