Author Topic: Urban Core Construction Update - March 2010  (Read 13808 times)

finehoe

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Re: Urban Core Construction Update - March 2010
« Reply #45 on: March 17, 2010, 02:02:27 PM »
Much like South Florida, Jacksonville used to have an abundance of cool mid-century modern buildings, and again like South Florida, Jacksonville has rushed to tear way too many of them down and replace them with some faux "historical" style.  In Miami-Dade and Broward, the replacement of choice seems to be Mediterranean, and in Duval the preference seems to be Prairie-style.

choosing2disappear

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Re: Urban Core Construction Update - March 2010
« Reply #46 on: March 17, 2010, 04:18:59 PM »
Regardless of appearances and architectural merits, the current form of 1661 does much more for the neighborhood.  Its retail bays are full of great tenants that really add to the walkability of the area.  

I agree about riverside ave.  I probably look like a drunk driver as a drive from memorial park to saint vincents. I am determined to avoid every pothole, no matter what.

Is the space in Avondale (across from the casbah, next to underwoods) finish??I noticed it fell off the update.

Well I understand what your getting at, but you can define VALUE (to the neighborhood) in many different ways. Had it not been demolished, it could be contributing as a unique historic structure. The inside could have been adapted for Einstein's or subway; a modern extension could have been built into a portion of the parking lot....
It doesn't take too much imagination to make it's survival economically viable. As for the condos upstairs? Build it elsewhere. Aren't folks on this thread gripping about the traffic congestion in that exact spot?

None of this was ever a real option because the people in the community, the stewards of the building in a sense, forgot about the big picture.  If downtown,  a parking garage now occupies the land where a Klutho once sat derelict, the garage creates income and convenience for many, but right and wrong of that situation should be obvious to all who read this.

Are we capable of learning from past mistakes? Collectively, this town is still living in denial. (on many issues, actually).

I know we have to move forward, but I see little evidence that tomorrow will be any better.
« Last Edit: March 17, 2010, 07:39:06 PM by choosing2disappear »

Dog Walker

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Re: Urban Core Construction Update - March 2010
« Reply #47 on: March 20, 2010, 09:22:16 AM »
Quote
It also doesn't matter from a preservation P.O.V that you think that style is ugly. That irrelevant. This isn't a fashion show, it's our historic record. If we let folks demolish older buildings just because something about it bothers you, what would we have left? The unbiased assessment of its virtue is for future generations to make.

Know the facts next time before you get involved in these public dialogues. UNF has a fine documentary on Hardwick, shot in 2002, you could begin your education there. Smiley

OK, facts.  I grew up in a modern house that Bill Morgan designed for my mother.  J. Brooks Haas was an investor in one of my father's businesses.  Bob Broward is a personal friend and was a neighbor.  I am familiar with architects and their work having hired a few for my own projects. 

Taylor Hardwick is a good one.  His innovative use use of space in the Hayden Burns library is fantastic.  That said, every architect has his bad projects, frequently from restrictions placed on him by clients, sometimes by just bad design.

1661, the medical office building, was architecturally a bad project.  Access to the offices from the parking lot was difficult.  Because of the strip mall layout, the office interiors were dark and cramped.  Many of the roof leaks were from skylights that had to be added post construction.  At the end of its life it was almost empty of tenants because better spaces became available and Riverside Hospital had closed.  While visually appealing from the outside, it did not fill it's function very well, became obsolete and could not be re-purposed.
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billy

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Re: Urban Core Construction Update - March 2010
« Reply #48 on: March 20, 2010, 09:52:25 AM »
As I think I mentioned earlier, my high school, uncle's insurance company and my childhood pediatrician's office were all Hardwick designs.
I made many visits to the Main Library.
Unfortunately, I associate the 1661 building with getting shots.

How is William Morgan doing?
I was emailing him a few years ago about one of his houses on the Intracoastal side of Jacksonville Beach. I highly recommend his books on indigenous architecture of the Americas, such as
Precolumbian Architecture of Eastern North America.

strider

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Re: Urban Core Construction Update - March 2010
« Reply #49 on: March 20, 2010, 11:32:45 AM »
 One of the interesting things about discussions involving saving historic structures is that very often the very historic structure being saved was only built because something else had been torn down.  Then also, how does a downtown make room for the future historic structures?  In other words, if everything is saved, then the architecture evolution of the area stops.  People like the old downtown library, yet something else worth saving was torn down for it to be built.  Which is better?  The newer building is historic in its own way.

The choices are difficult and yet required so that the next Klutho or  Morgan or Broward can have their place.

Just for the record, I am talking about commercial space as residential historic districts, I believe, need to be treated somewhat differently.  However, in both cases, there will always be some “natural” selection as buildings burn or otherwise get damaged and the choice will be made for us.  This seems like it should be enough to open space up for the new in residential matters but is not in commercial areas.  Hence, the difficult choices.
"My father says that almost the whole world is asleep. Everybody you know. Everybody you see. Everybody you talk to. He says that only a few people are awake and they live in a state of constant total amazement." Patrica, Joe VS the Volcano.

finehoe

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Re: Urban Core Construction Update - March 2010
« Reply #50 on: March 20, 2010, 11:36:23 AM »
how does a downtown make room for the future historic structures? 

That shouldn't be an issue in downtown Jacksonville with its abundance of empty lots.