Author Topic: Biodiesel: Why isn't every place doing this?  (Read 3321 times)

vicupstate

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Biodiesel: Why isn't every place doing this?
« on: November 16, 2008, 09:26:28 AM »

Biodiesel plan cooked up by Pickens school district, county

By Julie Howle

Pickens County and the School District of Pickens County have teamed up to keep used vegetable oil from possibly ending up in a landfill.

The partnership is part of the county's effort to take used cooking oil and turn it into biodiesel fuel for trucks and equipment, said Pickens County Administrator Chappell Hurst.

He said the county is taking the vegetable oil that is used for cooking in the school district's lunchrooms to be transformed into the biofuel.

"It will save them from having to dispose of it," Hurst said. "It will help us because then we don't have any cost basically associated with that oil, and we'll turn it into fuel that will be worth $3.50 or whatever it is a gallon."

He said officials are also contacting universities in the county to possibly get their oil and said they are looking at restaurants that fry foods as possible sources for oil.

"When it's going full bore it will probably save close to a half a million dollars (in a year)," Hurst said. "It depends on the price of oil."

Sally Gardner, director of Student Nutrition Services with the school district, said that previously the school district paid a company to pick up the grease and dispose of it.

This new partnership will save the school district and the county money, she said.

"We want to be a part of the go green concept and give back to our community what we can do to participate to make it a greener environment for everyone to live," Gardner said.

Hurst said the building that will house the equipment at the Pickens County Landfill should be erected by Thanksgiving.

The storage shed, of which a portion will be enclosed, will house the processing unit to turn the used oil into biodiesel fuel, along with three tanks to store the unprocessed fuel.

Hurst said the equipment will cost about $100,000 and the work on the storage shed will be about $45,000.

"With all the budget cuts and the economy as it is, this is a way for us to maintain our taxes, maintain our budget without adding taxes," he said.

"There are environmental benefits such as the clean air, which is something that we're definitely concerned about."
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jbm32206

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Re: Biodiesel: Why isn't every place doing this?
« Reply #1 on: November 16, 2008, 10:37:46 AM »
Mainly because it's very expensive....even though it helps with our fuel consumption

Joe

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Re: Biodiesel: Why isn't every place doing this?
« Reply #2 on: November 16, 2008, 10:49:35 AM »
Regarding the last line, I'm pretty sure that biodiesel was shown to create MORE pollution per unit than oil. Nevertheless, I'll support environmentalism that seeks out efficiency. There's no reason not to repurpose used cooking oil. It's better than throwing it away.

However, these kind of programs should never be mistaken for the total sham that is the ethanol industry. Producing biofuel through growing corn is an environmental and economic disaster. It's an absolute crime that our idiot congressmen are still promoting such nonsense.  

I've dropped a couple links (from sources that can't be dismissed as right-wing) to help my point
http://www.csmonitor.com/2007/0510/p17s01-wogi.html
http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/18551000/
« Last Edit: November 16, 2008, 10:51:59 AM by Joe »

vicupstate

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Re: Biodiesel: Why isn't every place doing this?
« Reply #3 on: November 16, 2008, 11:03:19 AM »
Mainly because it's very expensive....even though it helps with our fuel consumption

Huh?  A one time $145,000 equipment cost, in exchange for an annual savings of up to $500,000. 

Growing food crops for fuel production may very well be a bad idea, but making fuel out of what was previously disposed of in a landfill, is not the same thing. 
"The problem with quotes on the internet is you can never be certain they're authentic." - Abraham Lincoln

jbm32206

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Re: Biodiesel: Why isn't every place doing this?
« Reply #4 on: November 16, 2008, 11:06:22 AM »
It's costly to convert an engine to use that kind of fuel, and it still doesn't replace the standard engine. So yes, it's costly. I know someone who has a vehicle that has the conversion installed, and they weren't pleased with the performance nor the costs involved.

Ernest Street

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Re: Biodiesel: Why isn't every place doing this?
« Reply #5 on: November 16, 2008, 12:28:41 PM »
I Love The efficiency of Turbo Diesels and they have finally come of age.what concerns me is the inability to completely combust the fuel.(anyone that has smelled a Bio-Diesel running knows what I mean.) In my opinion..If you can smell pollution (oily residue in this case) it is Pollution.How finely filtered does it have to be to remove the fried potato/fish/chicken/burnt breading smell? Is there a national limit on how fine the refinement is to be?..or are they getting away with the bare minimum to please the EPA? ???

civil42806

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Re: Biodiesel: Why isn't every place doing this?
« Reply #6 on: November 16, 2008, 10:19:26 PM »
Because at present there is no profit in it.

vicupstate

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Re: Biodiesel: Why isn't every place doing this?
« Reply #7 on: November 17, 2008, 09:01:38 AM »
Because at present there is no profit in it.


Obviously, it isn't unprofitable in this case, or they would not be doing it. 
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civil42806

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Re: Biodiesel: Why isn't every place doing this?
« Reply #8 on: November 17, 2008, 09:41:54 AM »
Because at present there is no profit in it.


Obviously, it isn't unprofitable in this case, or they would not be doing it. 

I'm sorry but a single school district, subsidized by state funds, does not mean its profitable.

civil42806

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Re: Biodiesel: Why isn't every place doing this?
« Reply #9 on: November 17, 2008, 09:43:34 AM »
This is my favorite part of the article, think a high school teacher may be involved.

"It will help us because then we don't have any cost basically associated with that oil, and we'll turn it into fuel that will be worth $3.50 or whatever it is a gallon"


Ah rigorous science at work  8)

Dog Walker

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Re: Biodiesel: Why isn't every place doing this?
« Reply #10 on: November 24, 2008, 04:47:47 PM »
Let's get some things defined here before going off into space on discussions.

1.  Biodiesel is NOT used fryer oil, it can be made from used fryer oil or so called "virgin" i.e. unused oil.  Engines can be converted to burn used fryer oil directly, but that is not what this school district is doing.  Modern diesel injection systems, common rail or double pump systems, will NOT burn used fryer oil, but older, mechanical injection systems can.  Used fryer oil must be heated before it can be injected even by mechanical injectors.  What the conversion packages do is allow for engine heat to warm the fryer oil so that it can be burned, but the engines are run on petrodiesel until they get hot.

2. Any diesel engine can burn biodiesel without conversion.

3. Biodiesel can be made from any fat, vegetable or animal.

4. Biodiesel burns cleaner than petrodiesel and does not smell of french fries, chicken, etc. because it is a refined oil just as petrodiesel is.  There is no sulpher in biodiesel so it is cheaper to refine than petrodiesel.

5. Biodiesel is better at lubricating injection systems than petrodiesel.  Biodiesel is thicker than petrodiesel and more sensitive to low temperatures.

6. Most biodiesel is made from non-food fats.  Palm oil is a big source for the European biodiesel plants.

7. All Volkwagen, Mercedes, Fiat, Peugeot, Iveco, Volvo diesels delivered come from the factory with B-5 in their tanks.  That is 5% biodiesel and 95% petrodiesel.  The biodiesel is a lubricating additive that helps during the break-in period for the new injection system.

8. To make biodiesel from used fryer oil costs about $.75 per gallon for ingredients and about $1.50 per gallon when all costs are included.  By product of producing biodiesel from fat is glycerine soap.

9. Several cities in the U.S. can sell only B-20, i.e. 20% blend of biodiesel because this blend reduces the pollution produced by diesel engines and these cities are under EPA mandates to reduce their smog.

Every wonder about all of the boneless, skinless, chicken breasts that are consumed?  They don't just throw away the bones and skin, you betya!   The bones are ground up for animal feeds.  The skins are rendered for their high fat content and the fat is made into biodiesel!  Even the feathers are put into cheap dog food.  Everything but the cluck!  Ever eat fried pork skins? (Must be a Southerner!) Ever wonder what happens to the fat rendered from those skins?

There are algae that produce high percentages of fat as by products of their growth.  Waste heat and carbon dioxide from coal fired power plants can be used to force the growth of these algae to product large quantities of fat.

Don't conflate ethanol production with biodiesel production.  Making ethanol from corn is dumb!  It could be used to make bourbon!  What a waste.  Making ethanol from sugar cane is a proven, sound method.  Making ethanol from sugar beets might be OK, but making methanol (wood alcohol) from plant waste would be great!
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vicupstate

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Re: Biodiesel: Why isn't every place doing this?
« Reply #11 on: November 24, 2008, 05:12:59 PM »
This is my favorite part of the article, think a high school teacher may be involved.

"It will help us because then we don't have any cost basically associated with that oil, and we'll turn it into fuel that will be worth $3.50 or whatever it is a gallon"


Ah rigorous science at work  8)

Maybe you live in Saudi Arabia where gas sells for $0.50 a gallon, but gas has recently been $3.50 a gallon, even more in some places.  Diesel often is even more.  The price changes weekly, even daily.  So what exactly is your point?

You also have no argument for why they would attempt this is there were no cost savings involved.

       
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BridgeTroll

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Re: Biodiesel: Why isn't every place doing this?
« Reply #12 on: November 24, 2008, 05:58:08 PM »
Palm oil is also a destroyer of ecosystems... They are clear cutting malaysian rain forests for plantations and the practice is spreading to the Amazon basin...
In a boat at sea one of the men began to bore a hole in the bottom of the boat. On being remonstrating with, he answered, "I am only boring under my own seat." "Yes," said his companions, "but when the sea rushes in we shall all be drowned with you."

alta

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Re: Biodiesel: Why isn't every place doing this?
« Reply #13 on: November 25, 2008, 01:39:53 AM »
OCK

What did your wife think of the native women.  haha

Keith-N-Jax

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Re: Biodiesel: Why isn't every place doing this?
« Reply #14 on: November 25, 2008, 02:01:46 AM »
Leave it to OCK to come up with the pics.  ;D