Author Topic: DeSantis Signs 94 Laws, Vetoes 4 Others  (Read 14806 times)

jaxlongtimer

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DeSantis Signs 94 Laws, Vetoes 4 Others
« on: July 01, 2021, 12:48:31 AM »
DeSantis shocked even his own party with 4 vetoes while signing 94 other laws covering everything from bicyclists riding side by side in a bike lane to denying Key West the right to regulate cruise ship traffic in their town to having to turn in any space junk that falls into your yard.  He also signed a bill requiring schools to notify parents that they can deny their kids access to sex education courses that also include info on sexually transmitted diseases.  [It's well known that sex education promotes abstinence by explaining the potential consequences of sex while denying this education does not so this law will have unintended consequences.]

Vetoes include a law allowing the expunging of childhood criminal records when approved by a DA or police, requiring all drivers to have minimum liability insurance and requiring a civics course in schools.  He said he vetoed that last one because the course would be designed by the Univ. of South Florida and, as such, would promote their "preferred orthodoxy."  Paranoia anyone? 

Note that all of these laws were passed with near unanimous and bipartisan support of the House and Senate so he went against his own party on the vetoes.

Here is a full summary of all the laws that were before him:

https://www.news4jax.com/news/florida/2021/06/30/florida-gov-desantis-signs-94-bills-vetoes-4-others/
« Last Edit: July 01, 2021, 01:14:14 AM by jaxlongtimer »

jaxlongtimer

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Re: DeSantis Signs 94 Laws, Vetoes 4 Others
« Reply #1 on: February 07, 2022, 08:31:02 PM »
See article below.

Who does this legislator think he is hurting if he gets his bill passed?  Try our kids. Will DeSantis support it?

Recent reports say 1/2 of educators nationwide are looking to "retire" early.  Locally, there is such a shortage that district administrators are filling in and some teachers are teaching virtually.

With all the crazy education related bills coming out of Tallahassee + COVID + below average pay, it is a wonder anyone wants to teach in this State. 

Quote
As the legislative session entered its second half, both chambers unveiled their education budget proposals for the coming fiscal year.

Though they adhered largely to the wishes of Gov. Ron DeSantis, the spending plans included some surprises. Perhaps the biggest one came out of the House.

Rep. Randy Fine, who chairs the PreK-12 Appropriations subcommittee, recommended punishing the dozen districts that implemented strict mask mandates against state rule and law. He said they should have $200 million taken away, with that amount to be distributed to the 55 other districts that followed instructions.

The idea could prove a hot potato, because Fine said the money represented the salaries of 1,600-plus district-level officials in those counties. How those school systems, which include some of Florida’s largest, might operate without the department directors and other decision makers who currently receive those salaries remains an open question. Leon County superintendent Rocky Hanna called Fine an “childish, immature bully,” the Tallahassee Democrat reports....

https://www.tampabay.com/news/education/2022/02/07/florida-lawmakers-include-bombshells-perks-in-education-budget-proposals/

avonjax

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Re: DeSantis Signs 94 Laws, Vetoes 4 Others
« Reply #2 on: February 08, 2022, 02:15:31 PM »
DeSantis is the most despicable Governor in the entire  country.

BridgeTroll

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Re: DeSantis Signs 94 Laws, Vetoes 4 Others
« Reply #3 on: February 08, 2022, 04:43:13 PM »
DeSantis is the most despicable Governor in the entire  country.
Lol... I thought he resigned in NY...
In a boat at sea one of the men began to bore a hole in the bottom of the boat. On being remonstrating with, he answered, "I am only boring under my own seat." "Yes," said his companions, "but when the sea rushes in we shall all be drowned with you."

jaxlongtimer

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Re: DeSantis Signs 94 Laws, Vetoes 4 Others
« Reply #4 on: February 08, 2022, 06:25:05 PM »
DeSantis is the most despicable Governor in the entire  country.
Lol... I thought he resigned in NY...
Cuomo comes out on top because he resigned.  DeSantis hasn't.  When he does, he gets to move one notch up from last place  ;D.

The Texas governor should join him as he, arguably, is tied for last place with "de-spicable" De-Santis (an appropriate meme and makes for a nice alliteration!).

BridgeTroll

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Re: DeSantis Signs 94 Laws, Vetoes 4 Others
« Reply #5 on: February 08, 2022, 06:37:55 PM »
DeSantis is the most despicable Governor in the entire  country.
Lol... I thought he resigned in NY...
Cuomo comes out on top because he resigned.  DeSantis hasn't.  When he does, he gets to move one notch up from last place  ;D.

The Texas governor should join him as he, arguably, is tied for last place with "de-spicable" De-Santis (an appropriate meme and makes for a nice alliteration!).

I guess despicable depends on what colored glasses you're using...
In a boat at sea one of the men began to bore a hole in the bottom of the boat. On being remonstrating with, he answered, "I am only boring under my own seat." "Yes," said his companions, "but when the sea rushes in we shall all be drowned with you."

jaxlongtimer

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Re: DeSantis Signs 94 Laws, Vetoes 4 Others
« Reply #6 on: February 08, 2022, 09:42:10 PM »
Per below, Curry is unnecessarily hooking his wagon up to DeSantis.  If Curry cared about Jax interests, he should be thrilled to have bipartisan Congressional representation to cover his bases.  Say what you want, but Corrine Brown often worked with her GOP counterparts to look out for Jax.  And many Democrats consider moderate Lawson uncomfortably close to the GOP (with donations from many Jax area Republicans) so what reason does Curry have to complain.  Curry's shortsightedness and partisan behavior at all costs is really no surprise.  If the district holds, Curry will surely loose cooperation with Lawson.

Minority voters in Jacksonville that make up, in numbers, the largest portion of the 5th Congressional District will be none-to-happy with Curry's efforts to stick his nose into this redistricting battle to eliminate their "minority" district and effectively nullify their representation. 

So hypocritical as the GOPers' gerrymander to insure majority districts for themselves in spite of a popular voter-approved Florida constitutional amendment that was supposed to overcome efforts to do so.  It is what is wrong with politics today and why so many voters are disenchanted and disenfranchised.

Ideally, all districts are contestable, not favoring one interest over another.  This would insure less extreme candidates on both the left and right.  We are a long way away from that.

Quote
Jacksonville mayor Lenny Curry supports Gov. DeSantis's bid for redistricting opinion

Jacksonville Mayor Lenny Curry stepped into the heated redistricting battle by joining  Gov. Ron DeSantis in asking the Florida Supreme Court for an advisory opinion on keeping a congressional district that stretches from Jacksonville to west of Tallahassee.

Curry's filing Monday with the Supreme Court puts him at odds with U.S. Rep. Al Lawson, D-Tallahassee, who lashed out at DeSantis last week for seeking an opinion on whether the 5th Congressional District must continue to link minority populations in Jacksonville and the Tallahassee area.

Lawson renewed his criticism Monday in response to briefs filed with the Supreme Court.

“Lenny Curry is a former state chairman of the Republican Party, so I’m not surprised that he needs to toe the party line," Lawson said.....

https://www.jacksonville.com/story/news/politics/elections/local/2022/02/08/lenny-curry-sides-ron-desantis-over-al-lawson-redistricting/6695096001/

MusicMan

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Re: DeSantis Signs 94 Laws, Vetoes 4 Others
« Reply #7 on: February 09, 2022, 09:09:30 AM »
DeSantis is a fool. God willing 2% of Republicans will see him for what he is and we can find a new sensible Governor. His choice of Ladapo as Surgeon General will hopefully be one of the pieces of that puzzle, as I am sure a solid percentage of Florida physicians are Republican.
DeSantis picked arguably the least qualified person possible IN THE ENTIRE US to be the chief medical officer of the state, solely for his political views, not his medical expertise.

https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/politics/florida-s-top-doctor-refuses-to-say-if-he-s-vaccinated/ar-AATDpeJ?ocid=hplocalnews

jaxlongtimer

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Re: DeSantis Signs 94 Laws, Vetoes 4 Others
« Reply #8 on: February 09, 2022, 07:30:46 PM »
Interesting national article on "changing Florida" featuring Jacksonville as a bellwether:

Quote
Red California? Housing woes squeeze Florida’s middle class.

Six years ago, Jennifer Taylor counted herself among some 800 people a day moving into a state long considered “California on the cheap”: shorts weather in February, a decent house for not that much money, and low taxes.

Taxes are still low, and she can get her shorts out at least once a week after Groundhog Day. But in December, her rent rose by 20%, “from three figures into four figures.” And Ms. Taylor, a veterinary tech, says her middle-class dreams are fading as household costs – including the roof over her head – are rising faster than her income.

“I’m looking back and starting to wonder, why did we leave again?” she says. “Are we really better off?”

Not too long ago, a $26,000-a-year income used to guarantee middle-class status here. From Fluffy Landing to Possum Bluff, Florida was “a hopey-dreamy state,” as Sarah Palin once called it. But as Ms. Taylor and millions of other middle-class sun seekers are finding: “Florida is becoming expensive,” says historian Gary Mormino.

That’s true across the country, as housing prices, mortgage rates, and rents climb in lockstep, and available inventory reaches new lows. But the sticker shock is hitting Floridians particularly hard, and it’s coming at a time when the state is making headlines for its unexpected plunge into the kind of culture wars the Sunshine State used to avoid.

Florida’s current real estate boom cycle is a study of the intersection of middle-class aspirations and emerging values around what Americans really want – and whether they can afford it.

“People who get their money are still going to come into the state, but what does it say when you look more like California than you did Florida?” says former Florida resident Seth McKee, who now teaches political science at Oklahoma State University in Stillwater.

Liberal California has long been a piñata for conservatives, who see hypocrisy around bromides about diversity and inclusion clashing against an affordable housing crisis fed by NIMBY-ism.

Yet the same dynamics that have caused a crisis in California have been creeping into Florida markets. Tampa, Miami, and St. Augustine – the oldest city in the U.S. – have all seen double-digit price growth for years.

“I just don’t see it”

But the boom in Jacksonville suggests deeper currents: Slightly dingy suburbs are suddenly hot properties for flippers, fund investors, and young families seeking increasingly in vain their own postage stamp lot in the sun.

Long considered one of the stinkiest urban areas, given now-shuttered paper mills and turpentine distillers, Jacksonville – the largest city in the U.S. by acreage – smells a lot better these days. It’s a 30-minute drive to white beaches and lapping Atlantic waves.

House prices and rents soared nearly 30% from 2020 to 2021 – one of the highest rates in the country. The pace is not far behind the U.S. real estate boomtown champion of Boise, Idaho.

The increases in Jacksonville have touched real lives, real fast, says Eric Hinojos, a principal at First Coast Heroes, which caters to military families relocating to work at Naval Air Station Jacksonville.

He recounts how he recently helped a young couple sign papers on a home. But Veterans Affairs balked after it was appraised at $275,000, instead of the $290,000 listing price. The couple appealed and won.

“The military is our huge attraction,” says Mr. Hinojos. “We’ve got some growth, but we’re still just Jacksonville – it’s not San Francisco or Miami.”

Mark Wright, a retired private investigator, owns two houses that he bought at a flush moment in the late 1970s. So far, he sees taxes squeezing his fixed income as valuations rise. Yet he knows he is also sitting on a small fortune.

A few months ago, he tried unsuccessfully to buy a neighbor’s bungalow for $70,000. Last week, it sold for $200,000.

Mr. Wright shakes his head at the gap between his perception and reality. “I just don’t see it.”

The last time Florida saw net out-migration was in the throes of the Great Recession. The state was among those hardest hit by the mortgage crash.

The fundamentals are stronger this time around, says Ken Johnson, a real estate economist at Florida Atlantic University in Boca Raton. That homes are being valued far above where they should be given historical trends, he says, is “scary, but it’s not as bad as it was” at the height of the last boom in 2006.

But that emerging status quo is pitting a growing conservative and largely urban, white middle class against the policies and direction of Tallahassee, which is solidly in Republican hands. Housing policy, especially, is tough to implement during a boom cycle, says Mr. Johnson.

A “turnstile electorate”


The state’s Republican governor, Ron DeSantis, hails from Jacksonville. He squeaked by a progressive Democrat named Andrew Gillum in 2018, but has since yanked the ship of state hard to the right.

Aligning himself for a possible presidential run in 2024, he has framed the state as a vanguard in a national struggle over public health mandates, the teaching of race in school, and tax-and-spend policy. Florida is also at the center of evolving struggles of climate change, environmental degradation, and political narratives that are seeking to redefine the meaning of freedom and individualism.

One reason Mr. DeSantis’ rhetoric is playing well, says Mr. McKee, the Oklahoma State political scientist, is that Florida is bucking demographic trends seen in neighboring states.

Georgia, for example, voted for Joe Biden in 2020, but Florida, long a swing state, is moving in a concertedly more conservative direction. Voters here gave former President Donald Trump a wider margin in 2020 than in 2016.

And while many African Americans are retracing their families’ generational migrations back to the South, the demographics of those moving into Florida tell a different story. “That migration stream is incredibly white,” says Mr. McKee.

That doesn’t mean an immediate reckoning on rising home prices, given what some political scientists have called the state’s unique “turnstile electorate.”

“I don’t know what effects [rising home values] are going to have in terms of how it translates politically, in part because the electorate has such little memory,” says Mr. McKee. “I don’t think the typical Florida voter busies themselves with the politics. They got to Florida, they got the unbelievable weather that no one else in [continental] America has except California. There’s a focus on just about anything but politics. So when you have an electorate taking bits and pieces of the rhetoric, it just hasn’t hurt any of the politicians on the Republican side.”

Shortsighted culture wars?

Danielle Bobino, who left a job to care for her kindergarten-aged son, Benjamin, has watched the changes in her home state from her cinder block rental house in Jacksonville Heights, the city’s most affordable corner.

She has a nice park with a pond around the corner, where she and her son go to play.

But at the mall, she says she refused to sign a petition to raise the state’s minimum wage to $20 an hour. (It is currently $10.)

In her view, raising wages artificially will raise costs. Her rent is already going up this spring when she renews her yearly lease.

But she is not sure that Republicans are paying attention to core issues, either.

In fact, as a lifelong Republican, she says, “I’m embarrassed by what I’m seeing.” To her, playing up culture war issues is shortsighted. The problems are out in the open for politicians to try to solve, she says. But instead all she hears is complaining about what’s going on elsewhere.

Her concerns point to Florida’s more existential problems, says Mr. Mormino, author of the upcoming “Dreams in the New Century: Instant Cities, Shattered Hopes and Florida’s Turning Point.”

Constant growth, environmental degradation, and climate change are part of the state’s broader challenges. Last year, as a result of pollution, Floridians witnessed a historic mass starvation of manatees, the state animal.

Mr. Mormino counts off a list of Florida chroniclers who have decamped: Tampa Bay writer Jeff Klinkenberg now lives amid the snow-dusted peaks of Appalachia; well-known Florida columnist Howard Troxler retired to North Carolina.

Yet Mr. Mormino has decided to stay. He is holding on to what he calls “the hope of the parent – that the future holds promise.”

“Florida is still Florida: A trip to the Everglades or to Fort De Soto Park at sunset, it’s a remarkable place,” he says. “And did we mention there’s no state income tax?”

Ms. Taylor, meanwhile, is weighing her options. Going back home to Texas would feel like giving up. But her dream of moving to rural horse country around Ocala seems destined for trouble: Prices are going up there, too.

“Yeah, I’m very concerned about what happens to us next,” she says. “Times have gotten hard.”

https://news.yahoo.com/red-california-housing-woes-squeeze-154545922.html

MusicMan

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Re: DeSantis Signs 94 Laws, Vetoes 4 Others
« Reply #9 on: February 09, 2022, 08:52:51 PM »
That's a good one, Thanks for sharing.

avonjax

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Re: DeSantis Signs 94 Laws, Vetoes 4 Others
« Reply #10 on: February 10, 2022, 04:15:01 PM »
So bridgetroll what's your opinion of DeSantis?

avonjax

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Re: DeSantis Signs 94 Laws, Vetoes 4 Others
« Reply #11 on: February 10, 2022, 04:21:36 PM »
I'm sure DeSantis' wife is vaccinated and boostered. The same for the hypocrite lapado.  Despicable all of them.

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Re: DeSantis Signs 94 Laws, Vetoes 4 Others
« Reply #12 on: February 10, 2022, 04:45:38 PM »
So bridgetroll what's your opinion of DeSantis?

Two posters have described him as despicable and a fool. Clearly he is neither and those descriptions are emotional name calling of someone they disagree with. If I disagree with you does that make you a fool or despicable?  Of course not. We simply disagree.

I have stated more than once that I disagree with some of Desantis decisions. Overall I think he has done a pretty good job during a very difficult time. I think Ladapo is a poor choice but not getting overly excited about it because in reality nothing he does or says has any affect on me.

I do have to say that I have decided to leave Jacksonville… I will have more details shortly…
In a boat at sea one of the men began to bore a hole in the bottom of the boat. On being remonstrating with, he answered, "I am only boring under my own seat." "Yes," said his companions, "but when the sea rushes in we shall all be drowned with you."

vicupstate

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Re: DeSantis Signs 94 Laws, Vetoes 4 Others
« Reply #13 on: February 10, 2022, 08:30:37 PM »
DeSantis is a mean spirited, authoritarian, power hungry SOB. God help us if he becomes President. 
"The problem with quotes on the internet is you can never be certain they're authentic." - Abraham Lincoln

jaxlongtimer

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Re: DeSantis Signs 94 Laws, Vetoes 4 Others
« Reply #14 on: February 11, 2022, 01:07:47 PM »
So bridgetroll what's your opinion of DeSantis?

Two posters have described him as despicable and a fool. Clearly he is neither and those descriptions are emotional name calling of someone they disagree with. If I disagree with you does that make you a fool or despicable?  Of course not. We simply disagree.

I have stated more than once that I disagree with some of Desantis decisions. Overall I think he has done a pretty good job during a very difficult time. I think Ladapo is a poor choice but not getting overly excited about it because in reality nothing he does or says has any affect on me.

I do have to say that I have decided to leave Jacksonville… I will have more details shortly…

^ Clearly, our politics don't exactly align.  That said, sad to see you go.  I guess Curry and DeSantis were not enough to keep you here :).

The reason people are tough with terminology with the likes of DeSantis and Trump isn't really about simple disagreements.  These people are in powerful positions that enable them to act on their views and impose them on others who don't agree, who are shut out, marginalized and/or ignored in the "decision making" process and/or think such views are harmful, or even dangerous.  About the only thing dissenters can do at that point is try to shame them and hope they care, even a little bit, about their standing and legacy.  Name calling is just a way to compete for their attention.  And, it doesn't help that these characters are the first to do so themselves.

No one is a bigger name caller than Trump.  Among many things, he has, sadly, greatly lowered the bar for discourse in this country.  Look to him first to share your complaint.
« Last Edit: February 11, 2022, 01:10:32 PM by jaxlongtimer »