Author Topic: NoCo No-Go: 4 reasons to ax DIA's Downtown rebrand  (Read 9894 times)

Tacachale

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Re: NoCo No-Go: 4 reasons to ax DIA's Downtown rebrand
« Reply #15 on: June 08, 2021, 05:25:53 PM »
I'm creating a list of areas with "District" in the name that have not been changed to "Hill," "Heights" or "Hill Heights":

Gaslamp District, San Diego
Leather District, Boston
Ladder District, Boston
Seaport District, Boston
Wynwood Art District and Wynwood Fashion District, Miami
International District, Seattle
University District, Seattle
Centennial Park District, Atlanta
Mill District, Minneapolis

Do you believe that when the blue jay or another bird sings and the body is trembling, that is a signal that people are coming or something important is about to happen?

marcuscnelson

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Re: NoCo No-Go: 4 reasons to ax DIA's Downtown rebrand
« Reply #16 on: June 09, 2021, 12:19:45 AM »
It's very strange overall, because to an extent I am supportive of putting some importance on branding. The way we present ourselves to the world is important. But it's supposed to be derived of what the community envisions for itself, not just DIA + a consultant haphazardly putting new signs up.

And to see them burning effort on this while they're actively getting in the way of a big potential project for "NoCo" because their feelings are hurt seems like an insult to the process.
So, to the young people fighting in this movement for change, here is my charge: march in the streets, protest, run for school committee or city council or the state legislature. And win. - Ed Markey

Fallen Buckeye

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Re: NoCo No-Go: 4 reasons to ax DIA's Downtown rebrand
« Reply #17 on: June 09, 2021, 01:34:14 PM »
As a marketer myself, I'm bothered by lots of stuff with the whole brand strategy presented. At a foundational level, we have to ask what is the reason we want these neighborhoods to have strong independent brands. The most obvious answer is that these neighborhood brands strengthen the core brand of Jacksonville as a city with distinct and interesting urban areas to explore. In essence, the sub-brand is at the service of the core brand. It's very similar to how each model of a car has its own brand with specific features aimed at specific niches, but together these contribute to (or detract from) the core brand of the maker.

No one has really identified the core audience for these distinct neighborhoods and how they can speak to that audience. It seems to be mostly, "Oh. This looks good." More importantly, they don't seem to have given thought to how all of the disparate neighborhood brands contribute to and visually tie into the core brand of urban Jacksonville. The logo they came up with for Downtown Jax is more like a neat t-shirt design than an actual brand identity.

As Tachadale said, change for change's sake is wasteful. They need to consider the brand equity that has been built so far and see if it's worth losing that before starting over. North bank and south bank have a couple of things going for them. One, they call attention to the fact we have a great asset in the St. Johns river. Second, they're easily identifiable directionally, especially in the context of I-95. I'd leave it alone personally and focus on the other pieces I mentioned. This effort needs a complete restart.

Ken_FSU

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Re: NoCo No-Go: 4 reasons to ax DIA's Downtown rebrand
« Reply #18 on: June 10, 2021, 05:08:26 PM »
Per Lori Boyer, the rebrands will be part of the "master plan" that the DIA is wrapping up for downtown.

::Gulp::

WAJAS

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Re: NoCo No-Go: 4 reasons to ax DIA's Downtown rebrand
« Reply #19 on: June 10, 2021, 10:47:42 PM »
It's worth noting that while contrived neighborhood renamings are common, and many end up being adopted into common parlance, they're usually led by realtors and developers rather than the city government. There are other cases where a city government is involved, for example Charlotte's renaming of its Downtown to Uptown in the 1970s. One has to wonder why the city felt this was a good use of its time and resources.
A good local example is the recent renaming of the Uptown area in Orlando to North Quarter, which was championed by developers in the area as new residential was added in bulk over the past decade.

bl8jaxnative

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Re: NoCo No-Go: 4 reasons to ax DIA's Downtown rebrand
« Reply #20 on: June 11, 2021, 11:53:23 AM »
I'm creating a list of areas with "District" in the name that have not been changed to "Hill," "Heights" or "Hill Heights":

Gaslamp District, San Diego
Leather District, Boston
Ladder District, Boston
Seaport District, Boston
Wynwood Art District and Wynwood Fashion District, Miami
International District, Seattle
University District, Seattle
Centennial Park District, Atlanta
Mill District, Minneapolis

MPLS' mill district was really just downtown until the 1990s when folks realized branding it and giving it a name could help create a story and value for development.    Give them another 30 years and they'll change the name ;-)


Back in the 1980s it was mostly some old silos + surface parking lots.   

https://www.aerialarchives.com/Aerial-Photographs-of-Minneapolis.htm


This is coming from the other way, 1997.  This is when the whole name was came up with, developers got the city to save the whole Soo Line depot and things took off from there.

https://www.minnpost.com/politics-policy/2018/04/how-depot-saved-downtown-minneapolis/
« Last Edit: June 11, 2021, 12:22:30 PM by bl8jaxnative »

bl8jaxnative

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Re: NoCo No-Go: 4 reasons to ax DIA's Downtown rebrand
« Reply #21 on: June 11, 2021, 11:54:53 AM »

No one has really identified the core audience for these distinct neighborhoods and how they can speak to that audience. It seems to be mostly, "Oh. This looks good." More importantly, they don't seem to have given thought to how all of the disparate neighborhood brands contribute to and visually tie into the core brand of urban Jacksonville. The logo they came up with for Downtown Jax is more like a neat t-shirt design than an actual brand identity.



SOunds like a version of what others state, there's no real deep long term vision

jaxoNOLE

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Re: NoCo No-Go: 4 reasons to ax DIA's Downtown rebrand
« Reply #22 on: June 12, 2021, 01:38:46 AM »

No one has really identified the core audience for these distinct neighborhoods and how they can speak to that audience. It seems to be mostly, "Oh. This looks good."

The effort would have at least a little credibility if this were true. But the concepts don't look good. Many of them look like stock backgrounds from PowerPoint 2003. "Looks good,  but isn't authentic" would be far ahead of where they are. "Complete restart" is a spot-on assessment.