Author Topic: Artemis  (Read 7880 times)

BridgeTroll

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Artemis
« on: April 30, 2021, 08:17:46 AM »
Remember Apollo?  Artemis is the NASA project to return to the moon...

https://spaceflightnow.com/2021/04/29/core-stage-for-nasas-first-space-launch-system-rocket-towed-into-vehicle-assembly-building/

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A decade in the making, the core stage for NASA’s first Space Launch System heavy-lift rocket rolled into the Vehicle Assembly Building at the Kennedy Space Center Thursday to join up with twin solid rocket boosters and an Orion capsule for an unpiloted test flight around the moon.

Clad in orange foam thermal insulation, the 212-foot-long (64.6-meter) rocket rolled off NASA’s Pegasus barge Thursday morning on a transport cradle driven by a self-propelled mechanism that carefully drove the core stage the nearly half-mile distance from the Turn Basin to the south door of the VAB.

Ground teams took their time with the operation, moving the rocket along at a glacial pace after an issue with the self-propelled transporter delayed the start of the offload from the Pegasus barge by about three hours.

Finally, the rocket emerged at around 8:30 a.m. EDT (1230 GMT) Thursday from the Pegasus vessel, a specially-designed barge that once hauled external fuel tanks for space shuttles from their factory in New Orleans to the Florida launch site. NASA extended the length of the barge to 310 feet (94.4 meters) to fit the longer SLS core stage.

The Boeing-built core stage measures 27.6 feet (8.4 meters) in diameter, the same width as the shuttle external fuel tank. The gigantic core stage contains reservoirs that will hold more than 730,000 gallons of super-cold liquid hydrogen and liquid oxygen propellants for launch.

Four Aerojet Rocketdyne RS-25 engines are affixed to the rear of the core stage. All four engines are veterans of multiple space shuttle missions.

Engineers test-fired the four RS-25 engines for eight minutes March 18 at the Stennis Space Center in Mississippi, the same duration they will burn during a real launch. The hot fire was a final development test intended to iron out any glaring issues on the core stage before the first SLS test flight, known as Artemis 1.

Officials at Kennedy are eager to start working with the core stage inside the VAB. The two 177-foot-tall (54-meter) solid rocket boosters for the first SLS test flight, supplied by Northrop Grumman, are fully stacked on the rocket’s mobile launch platform in High Bay 3 inside the Vehicle Assembly Building.

With the core stage now at Kennedy, technicians will complete refurbishment of the rocket’s foam and cork insulation, which suffered some expected damage after the eight-minute RS-25 engine test-firing last month. Ground teams at Kennedy will also install ordnance to be used on the rocket’s flight termination system, which would activate to destroy the rocket if it flew off course and threatened the public during launch.

NASA aims to be ready by the end of May to rotate the rocket vertical and lift it by crane into High Bay 3. A crane operator will carefully lower the core stage in between the two SLS solid rocket boosters.

Workers will connect the core stage with each booster with braces at forward and aft attach points. Next will be stacking of the SLS upper stage, derived from the second stage used on United Launch Alliance’s Delta 4-Heavy rocket, and an adapter that will support the Orion spacecraft.

The rocket will be crowned with a mass model of the Orion spacecraft for structural resonance testing of the fully-stacked launch vehicle. Once that is complete, teams will move the real Orion spacecraft — already integrated with its launch abort system — to the VAB for attachment to the top of the Space Launch System.

The fully-assembled Space Launch System and Orion spacecraft will stand 322 feet (98 meters) tall. During launch, the rocket’s four RS-25 engines and twin solid rocket boosters will generate 8.8 million pounds of thrust. It can send about 59,500 pounds (27 metric tons) of mass to the Moon, more than any rocket operating today.

NASA plans to roll the Space Launch System out of the Vehicle Assembly Building for the first time as soon as August — but more likely in the fall — to travel to pad 39B for a countdown rehearsal. The launch team will load super-cold liquid hydrogen and liquid oxygen propellants into the rocket and practice countdown procedures.

After that is done, the rocket will return to the VAB for final checkouts and preparations, then will roll out to pad 39B again for launch.

 Steve Jurczyk, NASA’s acting administrator, said Tuesday that the agency still hopes to launch the Artemis 1 test flight by the end of 2021.

But he acknowledged the schedule was “challenging” to pull off the launch this year. A delay of any major milestone would put the launch date in jeopardy and slip the Artemis 1 mission to early 2022.

A second SLS/Orion test flight in 2023 will carry three NASA astronauts and a Canadian crew member around the moon and back to Earth. That mission, Artemis 2, will be the first time humans travel beyond low Earth orbit since the final Apollo moon mission in 1972.

Future Artemis missions will send astronauts back to the moon, and eventually land the first woman and the first person of color on the lunar surface, according to NASA.

The agency says the Space Launch System and Orion spacecraft are critical to the Artemis moon program, alongside a commercial human-rated lunar lander being developed by SpaceX, and a mini-space station to be placed into orbit around the moon.

But the programs, particularly the SLS, have faced years of delays and billions of dollars in cost overruns.

NASA started initial work on the Space Launch System in 2011, then eyeing an inaugural launch in 2017. As of June 2020, NASA had obligated $16.4 billion on the SLS program since its inception, according to the agency’s inspector general.
In a boat at sea one of the men began to bore a hole in the bottom of the boat. On being remonstrating with, he answered, "I am only boring under my own seat." "Yes," said his companions, "but when the sea rushes in we shall all be drowned with you."

BridgeTroll

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In a boat at sea one of the men began to bore a hole in the bottom of the boat. On being remonstrating with, he answered, "I am only boring under my own seat." "Yes," said his companions, "but when the sea rushes in we shall all be drowned with you."

jaxlongtimer

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Re: Artemis
« Reply #2 on: July 02, 2021, 12:47:26 AM »
The name brings back memories of "Artemis Gordon" on the TV series, The Wild Wild West:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Wild_Wild_West

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ross_Martin

BridgeTroll

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Re: Artemis
« Reply #3 on: July 15, 2021, 01:19:21 PM »
https://spaceflightnow.com/2021/07/14/upper-stage-added-to-sls-stack-in-vehicle-assembly-building/

Quote
The upper stage for the first flight of NASA’s Space Launch System was installed on top of the heavy-lift rocket earlier this month, moving the agency one step closer to liftoff of the Artemis 1 test mission to the moon.

Teams inside the Vehicle Assembly Building at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center lifted the Interim Cryogenic Propulsion Stage on top of the SLS rocket stack July 5. The addition of the upper stage completed stacking of the propulsive elements for the first SLS mission, known as Artemis 1.

Last month, ground crews mounted the SLS core stage between the rocket’s two side-mounted solid-fueled boosters, which were stacked on a mobile launch platform inside the VAB earlier this year. Then teams added the Launch Vehicle Stage Adapter, a conical structure that tapes from the larger diameter of the core stage to the smaller upper stage.

The Interim Cryogenic Propulsion Stage, or ICPS, was built by United Launch Alliance and is based on the upper stage used on the company’s Delta 4-Heavy rocket. The ICPS will provide the boost to send NASA’s Orion crew capsule out of Earth orbit toward the moon on the Artemis 1 test flight.

No astronauts will fly on the Artemis 1 mission, but the test flight will pave the way for future piloted Artemis lunar missions, beginning with Artemis 2 scheduled for launch in 2023.

The five-meter-diameter ICPS contains liquid hydrogen and liquid oxygen propellant tanks to feed the stage’s Aerojet Rocketdyne RL10B-2 engine. The ICPS has a slightly larger liquid hydrogen tank than the Delta 4 upper stage, features a second hydrazine bottle for additional attitude control propellant, and has electrical and mechanical interfaces for attaching the Orion spacecraft, according to ULA.

Before transporting the upper stage to the VAB, teams loaded hydrazine fuel into the ICPS to feed maneuvering jets used to point the rocket in space.

During the Artemis 1 launch, the solid rocket boosters will fire two minutes, doing most of the work to lift the Space Launch System off pad 39B at the Kennedy Space Center. The core stage’s four hydrogen-fueled RS-25 engines, leftovers from the space shuttle program, will burn more than eight minutes to place the rocket into space with a velocity just shy of that required to reach a stable orbit.

The ICPS main engine will fire two times on the Artemis 1 mission, first for a Perigee Raise Maneuver to place the Orion spacecraft into around Earth, followed by a Trans-Lunar Injection burn lasting nearly 20 minutes to send the capsule toward the moon, ULA said.

The upper stage will then deploy the Orion spacecraft, which has its own service module for course correction burns and maneuvers to enter and exit lunar orbit, then return to Earth for a splashdown in the Pacific Ocean. The ICPS will deploy more than 13 CubeSats to explore the moon, asteroids, and other destinations in deep space.

NASA has ordered three ICPS units from United Launch Alliance to power the first three Artemis missions to the moon. Boeing is developing a more powerful Exploration Upper Stage with four RL10 engines for later Artemis launches.

The stacking of the SLS upper stage sets the stage for lifting of the Orion Stage Adapter, the attachment ring connecting the rocket with the Orion spacecraft.

Then a structure will go on top of the rocket to simulate the weight of the Orion capsule. The mass simulator will be atop the Space Launch System for testing to verify the propellant lines, fluid connections, and other umbilicals running between the mobile launch platform’s tower and the rocket can safely release and retract as they will at liftoff.

Then teams will move into structural resonance testing, or modal testing, of the fully-stacked launch vehicle. Once that is complete, teams will move the real Orion spacecraft — which will already be integrated with its launch abort system — to the VAB for attachment to the top of the Space Launch System, an event that sources say is now expected no sooner than September.

NASA will roll the fully-assembled 322-foot-tall (98-meter) Space Launch System from the VAB to pad 39B for a wet dress rehearsal this fall. The rehearsal is essentially a practice countdown, during which the launch team will load cryogenic propellants into the Space Launch System.

After the practice countdown, the SLS and Orion spacecraft will return to the Vehicle Assembly Building for final closeouts, inspections, and ordnance connections.

NASA Administrator Bill Nelson said Wednesday that the agency is holding to a target launch date for the Artemis 1 mission before the end of this year.
 
In a boat at sea one of the men began to bore a hole in the bottom of the boat. On being remonstrating with, he answered, "I am only boring under my own seat." "Yes," said his companions, "but when the sea rushes in we shall all be drowned with you."

BridgeTroll

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Re: Artemis
« Reply #4 on: December 19, 2021, 08:34:08 AM »
In a boat at sea one of the men began to bore a hole in the bottom of the boat. On being remonstrating with, he answered, "I am only boring under my own seat." "Yes," said his companions, "but when the sea rushes in we shall all be drowned with you."

BridgeTroll

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Re: Artemis
« Reply #5 on: January 12, 2022, 08:43:34 AM »
https://www.nasa.gov/exploration/systems/sls/nasa-prepares-sls-moon-rockets-for-first-crewed-artemis-missions.html

While Artemis I has been pushed back to March or April... Artemis II, III, and IV are being constructed and put together... we are going back to the moon soon...  8)
In a boat at sea one of the men began to bore a hole in the bottom of the boat. On being remonstrating with, he answered, "I am only boring under my own seat." "Yes," said his companions, "but when the sea rushes in we shall all be drowned with you."

BridgeTroll

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In a boat at sea one of the men began to bore a hole in the bottom of the boat. On being remonstrating with, he answered, "I am only boring under my own seat." "Yes," said his companions, "but when the sea rushes in we shall all be drowned with you."

BridgeTroll

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Re: Artemis
« Reply #7 on: February 26, 2022, 08:48:24 AM »
In a boat at sea one of the men began to bore a hole in the bottom of the boat. On being remonstrating with, he answered, "I am only boring under my own seat." "Yes," said his companions, "but when the sea rushes in we shall all be drowned with you."

BridgeTroll

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Re: Artemis
« Reply #8 on: March 15, 2022, 11:01:14 AM »
In a boat at sea one of the men began to bore a hole in the bottom of the boat. On being remonstrating with, he answered, "I am only boring under my own seat." "Yes," said his companions, "but when the sea rushes in we shall all be drowned with you."

BridgeTroll

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Re: Artemis
« Reply #9 on: March 19, 2022, 09:13:02 AM »
Most powerful rocket ever built sits at launch pad...

https://www.space.com/nasa-artemis-1-moon-mission-rollout-launch-pad
In a boat at sea one of the men began to bore a hole in the bottom of the boat. On being remonstrating with, he answered, "I am only boring under my own seat." "Yes," said his companions, "but when the sea rushes in we shall all be drowned with you."

BridgeTroll

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Re: Artemis
« Reply #10 on: April 18, 2022, 06:40:49 AM »
The launch pad testing found some problems that can only be resolved back at the assembly building...

https://spaceflightnow.com/2022/04/17/nasa-to-return-artemis-moon-rocket-to-assembly-building-for-repairs/
In a boat at sea one of the men began to bore a hole in the bottom of the boat. On being remonstrating with, he answered, "I am only boring under my own seat." "Yes," said his companions, "but when the sea rushes in we shall all be drowned with you."

BridgeTroll

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Re: Artemis
« Reply #11 on: May 11, 2022, 07:37:58 AM »
In a boat at sea one of the men began to bore a hole in the bottom of the boat. On being remonstrating with, he answered, "I am only boring under my own seat." "Yes," said his companions, "but when the sea rushes in we shall all be drowned with you."

BridgeTroll

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Re: Artemis
« Reply #12 on: May 18, 2022, 07:41:40 AM »
After a (hopefully) successful fueling test in June... here are the possible launch dates and the factors that affect and constrain the dates...

https://www.nasa.gov/feature/artemis-i-mission-availability
In a boat at sea one of the men began to bore a hole in the bottom of the boat. On being remonstrating with, he answered, "I am only boring under my own seat." "Yes," said his companions, "but when the sea rushes in we shall all be drowned with you."

jaxjaguar

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Re: Artemis
« Reply #13 on: May 18, 2022, 09:42:55 AM »
Selfishly hoping for August as I won't be in state during the July dates  ;D

BridgeTroll

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Re: Artemis
« Reply #14 on: June 16, 2022, 07:46:00 AM »
Wet dress rehearsal begins again Saturday... (fingers crossed) :)

https://www.space.com/artemis-1-moon-rocket-wet-dress-rehearsal-preview
In a boat at sea one of the men began to bore a hole in the bottom of the boat. On being remonstrating with, he answered, "I am only boring under my own seat." "Yes," said his companions, "but when the sea rushes in we shall all be drowned with you."