Author Topic: Neighborhoods: North Shore  (Read 933 times)

thelakelander

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Neighborhoods: North Shore
« on: July 23, 2020, 07:35:32 AM »
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Once the Jacksonville's northern border along the Trout River, North Shore is a quiet enclave of tranquility that has stood the test of time.

Read More: https://www.thejaxsonmag.com/article/neighborhoods-north-shore/
"A man who views the world the same at 50 as he did at 20 has wasted 30 years of his life.” - Muhammad Ali

bl8jaxnative

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Re: Neighborhoods: North Shore
« Reply #1 on: July 23, 2020, 12:39:11 PM »

Thank you.

Side note - Tallulah does not have bike lanes.

fieldafm

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Re: Neighborhoods: North Shore
« Reply #2 on: July 23, 2020, 01:08:55 PM »

Thank you.

Side note - Tallulah does not have bike lanes.

Side note, you are wrong.... and you can clearly see the buffer in the pictures.

Charles Hunter

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Re: Neighborhoods: North Shore
« Reply #3 on: July 23, 2020, 01:57:33 PM »
fieldafm is correct, but in bl8jaxnative's defense, there are no Bike Lane signs or pavement markings.

thelakelander

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Re: Neighborhoods: North Shore
« Reply #4 on: July 23, 2020, 02:26:42 PM »
Looks like an unmarked facility although I swore I've seen bike facility signage out there in the past.
"A man who views the world the same at 50 as he did at 20 has wasted 30 years of his life.” - Muhammad Ali

tufsu1

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Re: Neighborhoods: North Shore
« Reply #5 on: July 23, 2020, 09:05:19 PM »
Looks like an unmarked facility although I swore I've seen bike facility signage out there in the past.

A few years ago, a JTA study recommended narrowing the travel lanes slightly such that 5' bike lanes could be implemented

bl8jaxnative

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Re: Neighborhoods: North Shore
« Reply #6 on: July 28, 2020, 11:19:22 AM »

Thank you.

Side note - Tallulah does not have bike lanes.

Side note, you are wrong.... and you can clearly see the buffer in the pictures.

You're' conflating the shoulder of the road with a bike lane.    The road - like many others - has a solid white line to delineate the shoulder and the travel lane area.   


There is not a bike lane.   

The saddest part of that is it _feels_ like it would be because so many cities have created very dangerous "bike lanes" that are nothing more than the old shoulder of the road with a few bike lane signs hoisted up.  Anyone who values their hide would ever ride in that sort of death path.

Charles Hunter

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Re: Neighborhoods: North Shore
« Reply #7 on: July 28, 2020, 12:06:32 PM »
If I remember correctly, the continuous sidewalk was considered an alternative to a proper bike lane.

thelakelander

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Re: Neighborhoods: North Shore
« Reply #8 on: July 28, 2020, 12:56:28 PM »

Thank you.

Side note - Tallulah does not have bike lanes.

Side note, you are wrong.... and you can clearly see the buffer in the pictures.

You're' conflating the shoulder of the road with a bike lane.    The road - like many others - has a solid white line to delineate the shoulder and the travel lane area.   


There is not a bike lane.

I'm not mixing the two. In the FDM (https://fdotwww.blob.core.windows.net/sitefinity/docs/default-source/topics/223.pdf?sfvrsn=91058ff2_0) there are situations where a shoulder is also considered an unmarked bicycle facility, depending on a variety of factors. This all assumes there's a minimum width of 4' on that corridor. I also acknowledge that this particular road diet predates the FDM, so it may not representative of current FDOT design standards.

Quote
The saddest part of that is it _feels_ like it would be because so many cities have created very dangerous "bike lanes" that are nothing more than the old shoulder of the road with a few bike lane signs hoisted up.  Anyone who values their hide would ever ride in that sort of death path.

No doubt, we've done a poor job of balancing mobility on our streets in general. Luckily there are steps that have been done and continue to be done behind the scenes to make things better. The swtich from the FDOT PPM to the FDM and the continued annual updates are a good example of this.
"A man who views the world the same at 50 as he did at 20 has wasted 30 years of his life.” - Muhammad Ali

fieldafm

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Re: Neighborhoods: North Shore
« Reply #9 on: July 29, 2020, 09:16:16 AM »

Thank you.

Side note - Tallulah does not have bike lanes.

Side note, you are wrong.... and you can clearly see the buffer in the pictures.

You're' conflating the shoulder of the road with a bike lane.    The road - like many others - has a solid white line to delineate the shoulder and the travel lane area.   


There is not a bike lane.   

The saddest part of that is it _feels_ like it would be because so many cities have created very dangerous "bike lanes" that are nothing more than the old shoulder of the road with a few bike lane signs hoisted up.  Anyone who values their hide would ever ride in that sort of death path.

Cyclists ride along Tallulah with greater frequency than many other urban core neighborhoods, I assure you.

And while you may not believe it to be a bike lane... it is. It was part of the Mobility Fee monies collected for Zone 9.