Author Topic: Changing the Urban Landscape in 2020  (Read 1200 times)

thelakelander

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Changing the Urban Landscape in 2020
« on: January 02, 2020, 08:17:10 AM »
Quote


2019 saw Brooklyn continue the place for infill downtown development, an increase in questionable downtown demolitions, and more media coverage on mega projects that continue to fail to actually break ground in Jacksonville's urban core. Looking forward to 2020, here are five trends, projects or issues that have the potential to change the urban core as we know it.

Read More: https://www.thejaxsonmag.com/article/changing-the-urban-landscape-in-2020/
"A man who views the world the same at 50 as he did at 20 has wasted 30 years of his life.” - Muhammad Ali

sanmarcomatt

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Re: Changing the Urban Landscape in 2020
« Reply #1 on: January 02, 2020, 08:30:57 AM »
Can’t wait for some of the debate on white ‘color’ job growth being #1.

Guess it could be a misprint, though.

thelakelander

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Re: Changing the Urban Landscape in 2020
« Reply #2 on: January 02, 2020, 08:34:53 AM »
Lol, definitely a typo.
"A man who views the world the same at 50 as he did at 20 has wasted 30 years of his life.” - Muhammad Ali

Fallen Buckeye

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Re: Changing the Urban Landscape in 2020
« Reply #3 on: January 02, 2020, 06:45:31 PM »
Lol, definitely a typo.
Or a Freudian slip. lol.

MusicMan

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Re: Changing the Urban Landscape in 2020
« Reply #4 on: January 02, 2020, 08:01:06 PM »
"During the last decade, downtown’s revitalization dreams have been pinned on the hopes of seeing heavily subsidized mega developments such as The District, the Shipyards or Lot J come to fruition. Despite years of fanfare and promises, all of these master developer-style mega projects have failed to materialize into vertical reality."

Honestly that's an understatement. They haven't even started the basic infrastructure.

Jtm312fl

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Re: Changing the Urban Landscape in 2020
« Reply #5 on: January 03, 2020, 09:44:35 AM »
Keep up the excellent work of thorough research, super recommendations, and challenges to the strange policies and procedures that seem to characterize Jacksonville. You have provided many facts and models of other situations in which cities have created positive results to attract retail, restaurants, locals, and visitors. 

jaxlongtimer

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Re: Changing the Urban Landscape in 2020
« Reply #6 on: January 03, 2020, 09:31:32 PM »
I asked this on another thread and am asking again here, seeing no response:

Does anyone know the results of the environmental study for Lot J?  I recall the results should be known by now.  Haven't seen any reports on it.

Bativac

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Re: Changing the Urban Landscape in 2020
« Reply #7 on: January 05, 2020, 12:42:12 AM »
Last thing that I read said they were granted approval to do the testing in late October.

This whole deal seems weirder to me the more I read about it, though. The city still owns the land, correct? And the developer will just be allowed to own what they build on top of it? That sounds similar to another deal where the city owned the land under the structure but I can't seem to recall how that went........

thelakelander

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Re: Changing the Urban Landscape in 2020
« Reply #8 on: January 05, 2020, 01:13:51 AM »
It's identical except taxpayers will be on the hook for a lot more.
"A man who views the world the same at 50 as he did at 20 has wasted 30 years of his life.” - Muhammad Ali

jcjohnpaint

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Re: Changing the Urban Landscape in 2020
« Reply #9 on: January 05, 2020, 06:21:13 PM »
It will give Curry something to tear down

Bativac

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Re: Changing the Urban Landscape in 2020
« Reply #10 on: January 05, 2020, 11:27:19 PM »
So I want to make sure I have it right.

The investors (Shad Khan and whoever else) want to build buildings on top of city-owned land.

The city will continue to own the land.

The investors are asking for $233 million in incentives from the city to build a development on top of city-owned land.

So, basically, they want the city to pay more than half the cost to build on land the city owns. And the developers put in the other $200 or so million (assuming the project gets that far) and build some buildings. Who will own those? I can't find any clear into online beyond a statement that says the city plans to "transfer ownership" of those buildings. Does this mean the city owns those, too, unless and until they "transfer ownership" to someone else? Or the investors own those once they're built, since I guess they're paying for them?

The city would own the entertainment portion of the development, which they are calling LIVE! District, but someone else would operate it. Right?

And the city gets.... what out of the deal, for its $233 million? Hopefully a lot more people living and working right next to the stadium? And this will benefit downtown to the extent that it's worth subsidizing it for a quarter of a billion dollars?

And one more thing. The Cordish Companies, who have built a bunch of these LIVE! districts, always include a mix of shops, restaurants, and entertainment.

So it's city owned land, and upon it is being built a mixed use structure that will include shops, restaurants, and entertainment. Like the thing they just demolished down the street.

Do I have all this right? Surely this smells funny to, I dunno, everyone else.

Snaketoz

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Re: Changing the Urban Landscape in 2020
« Reply #11 on: January 06, 2020, 08:47:32 AM »
I just hope they don't tear down the Hart ramps to downtown until they have a solid commitment that lot J will really be built.  I firmly believe they shouldn't tear the ramps down.  It will cost a mint to re-route traffic from the Hart downtown, and will only isolate the central downtown district.  We need something to compliment downtown, not compete with it.