Author Topic: Urban Construction Update - December 2019  (Read 872 times)

thelakelander

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Urban Construction Update - December 2019
« on: December 11, 2019, 08:41:39 AM »
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Here is a brief look at the status of various developments under construction in and around Downtown Jacksonville in December 2019.

Read More: https://www.thejaxsonmag.com/article/urban-construction-update-december-2019/
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acme54321

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Re: Urban Construction Update - December 2019
« Reply #1 on: December 11, 2019, 09:12:59 AM »
Over the last few days they have been dumping loads of fill material on the front of the old Belk site at Roosevelt Square.   Looks like it might be the start of sitework. 

marcuscnelson

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Re: Urban Construction Update - December 2019
« Reply #2 on: December 11, 2019, 09:40:47 AM »
I just noticed that the JRTC has started getting painted and it suddenly looks 10x better. The dark gray really suits it.

Downtown Osprey

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Re: Urban Construction Update - December 2019
« Reply #3 on: December 11, 2019, 10:02:27 AM »
My god could that MedMen building be any more ugly?

cindy394

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Re: Urban Construction Update - December 2019
« Reply #4 on: December 11, 2019, 10:22:15 AM »
I was surprised to see that the 527 Lofts project in the Cathedral District was left out.  The project was lauded in the media this summer but none of the articles mentioned that 7 historic homes built after the Great Fire of 1901 and continuously occupied since, are slated to be demolished.  The  owner, developer, Arkest LLC, were required to get approval and request a demolition permit.  The city staff wrote a report highlighting the historic significance of the properties- when most of the residential historic stock has been removed downtown.  Nonetheless the HPC board felt it was an undue burden on the owner of the property to require preservation and granted the demolition permit.  As I write this all the homes occupants have left or been evicted and the imminent demolition is about to take place on the 4 2 story homes.  Once of which 511/513 East Duval, is in exceptional condition with a mostly original interior.  6 of the 7 homes have all original windows, doors, siding, trim and hardwood or pine floors. 3 of the 7 homes are traditional "shotgun" homes and are available to move but are somewhat landlocked in that area and would be $40-$45,000 to relocate them in historic communities north of there (Oakland and Springfield) and require removal of the roofs and rebuilding because of lights and utilities (the  overpasses in the district are all only 14').  I would be curious on what "The Jaxson" feels about this and your readership.  Also want to inform the public this is happening and the shotgun homes are available to relocate.  The plastic orange fencing is now up around the larger homes and could be taken down any day.  The owner is anxious to remove them- even though there will be no ground breaking on the site until next June.

ProjectMaximus

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Re: Urban Construction Update - December 2019
« Reply #5 on: December 11, 2019, 10:31:43 AM »
CHOP Barbershop in Murray Hill is open now at Post and Edgewood. Not sure if you had included it in the previous constructions (can't remember seeing it) but anyway they are open and seem quite popular. They'll also have a location in Brooklyn Place once that is complete next year.

Captain Zissou

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Re: Urban Construction Update - December 2019
« Reply #6 on: December 11, 2019, 10:42:43 AM »
3 of the 7 homes are traditional "shotgun" homes and are available to move but are somewhat landlocked in that area and would be $40-$45,000 to relocate them in historic communities north of there (Oakland and Springfield) and require removal of the roofs and rebuilding because of lights and utilities (the  overpasses in the district are all only 14').

To my knowledge, the owner has been openly stating that the homes are free to whoever wants to go through the process of relocating them.  The expenses listed here may be why no one has taken him up on that offer.  He has gone through all the necessary steps and then some, so at this point there's not much that can be done to save the buildings. 

thelakelander

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Re: Urban Construction Update - December 2019
« Reply #7 on: December 11, 2019, 11:43:02 AM »
I was surprised to see that the 527 Lofts project in the Cathedral District was left out.  The project was lauded in the media this summer but none of the articles mentioned that 7 historic homes built after the Great Fire of 1901 and continuously occupied since, are slated to be demolished.  The  owner, developer, Arkest LLC, were required to get approval and request a demolition permit.  The city staff wrote a report highlighting the historic significance of the properties- when most of the residential historic stock has been removed downtown.  Nonetheless the HPC board felt it was an undue burden on the owner of the property to require preservation and granted the demolition permit.  As I write this all the homes occupants have left or been evicted and the imminent demolition is about to take place on the 4 2 story homes.  Once of which 511/513 East Duval, is in exceptional condition with a mostly original interior.  6 of the 7 homes have all original windows, doors, siding, trim and hardwood or pine floors. 3 of the 7 homes are traditional "shotgun" homes and are available to move but are somewhat landlocked in that area and would be $40-$45,000 to relocate them in historic communities north of there (Oakland and Springfield) and require removal of the roofs and rebuilding because of lights and utilities (the  overpasses in the district are all only 14').  I would be curious on what "The Jaxson" feels about this and your readership.  Also want to inform the public this is happening and the shotgun homes are available to relocate.  The plastic orange fencing is now up around the larger homes and could be taken down any day.  The owner is anxious to remove them- even though there will be no ground breaking on the site until next June.

This project was left out because construction hasn't started. At this point, it's still planned or proposed. The Jaxson hasn't taken an official stance on the demolition of the residences or this specific project. However, we did cover it on our IG page back in June.

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thejaxsonmag
One of the Cathedral District's last complete rows of urban housing developed after the Great Fire of 1901 could be going away soon. Replacing it would be an infill, mixed-use project called 527 Duval Street, featuring 45 multi-family units and 27,000 square feet of art gallery space, art studios and classrooms.

#jacksonville #florida #jax #ilovejax #thejaxsonmag #onlyinjax #urbancore #urbancorejax #dtjax

You can read the comments from various people here: https://www.instagram.com/p/BzDdrd2hy_J/

Personally, I'm not crazy about the demolition of historic building stock when we have so much surface parking and vacant lots all over the place where infill is desperately needed. I also understand the possibility of relocating the structures but I doubt the cost associated with relocation are financially feasible. Anyone interested in relocating a shotgun to the Eastside would be better off buying a row of existing shotguns already there for equal or less than it would cost to move these. The same issue exists with Fire Station No. 5 in Brooklyn.

Ultimately I see the challenge/solution as a larger issue focusing around changing our local public policies to empower adaptive reuse and preservation of existing building stock and the historic sense of place of older neighborhoods as new infill materializes incrementally over time. For example, while we talk about this specific site, we have more significant rows disappearing in the Eastside, Durkeeville and other underrepresented historic communities surrounding downtown right now as we speak.  Much of my individual time recently has been trying to help the voice of the residents in those communities since quite a few organizations appear to be forming to take on downtown's continued challenges.
« Last Edit: December 11, 2019, 02:02:19 PM by thelakelander »
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fieldafm

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Re: Urban Construction Update - December 2019
« Reply #8 on: December 11, 2019, 01:43:51 PM »
However, we did cover it on our IG page back in June.

Quote
thejaxsonmag
One of the Cathedral District's last complete rows of urban housing developed after the Great Fire of 1901 could be going away soon. Replacing it would be an infill, mixed-use project called 527 Duval Street, featuring 45 multi-family units and 27,000 square feet of art gallery space, art studios and classrooms.

#jacksonville #florida #jax #ilovejax #thejaxsonmag #onlyinjax #urbancore #urbancorejax #dtjax

You can read the comments from various people here: https://www.instagram.com/p/BzDdrd2hy_J/

In addition to the Instagram post, the original story (found here: https://www.thejaxsonmag.com/article/mixed-use-infill-proposed-for-cathedral-district/ ) was posted several times on our Facebook and Twitter feeds and further discussed in the forurms here:   https://www.metrojacksonville.com/forum/index.php/topic,35580.0.html


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For example, while we talk about this specific site, we have more significant rows disappearing in the Eastside, Durkeeville and other underrepresented historic communities surrounding downtown right now as we speak.

In the last couple of months, I have personally counted about 11 such buildings that have come down in these neighborhoods (which also includes Brooklyn).

I also echo the sentiments that raising hell about a particular shotgun house in the Cathedral District, or of the fire station in Brooklyn (which has had nearly 20 years since the City made probably the best economic development deal of all time to bring the Fidelity companies' headquarters here.. a deal that included a reasonable and forward-thinking land swap for future campus expansion) is less of an issue. The bigger, more fundamental issue is how can policies be modified that encourages the adaptive reuse of historical building stock in a more economical way?  How can public policies be changed so that historical context of a neighborhood is respected while also allowing for a mix of new construction and reuse of existing buildings?  Currently, policy is so skewed toward tear down (and not necessarily replace) or allowing for demo by neglect, without having a forward-thinking strategy for reuse where appropriate.
« Last Edit: December 11, 2019, 02:29:24 PM by fieldafm »

fieldafm

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Re: Urban Construction Update - December 2019
« Reply #9 on: December 11, 2019, 01:48:01 PM »
My god could that MedMen building be any more ugly?

For what its worth the original plan, seen here https://www.thejaxsonmag.com/article/medical-marijuana-dispensary-coming-to-five-points/ , was going to cover up the Shaun Thurston mural on the Lomax side. The building's color scheme has since been modified, preserving the mural.

Until recreational use of the product is legalized in Florida, MedMen's rapid expansion in the state seems to be a very long play based on the state's rapidly aging population, a current regulatory system that doesn't allow for much in the way of competition (due the restriction of licenses and the requirement to be a veritically-integrated distribution system) and a bet on eventual recreational use allowance. The amount of patients isn't exactly booming so far in Florida, and the company is facing cash problems. MedMen sells a premium product that is priced as such, so in the near term... my personal opinion is that I don't see many recreational users running out to get prescriptions and paying 4-5 times the cost for these 'products' versus what they are already paying from non-legal sources.

Of note, this article https://labusinessjournal.com/news/2019/nov/15/medmen-announces-190-layoffs-restructuring/ indicates that the company has pledged to its investors that any future store openings in 2020 will be restricted to locations that project at least $10 million in annual sales. For reasons noted above, I can't see this particular location reaching that top line revenue figure for quite some time... but who knows?

BTW, the Five Points MedMen dispensary is the most expensive retail lease in Jacksonville (in terms of $/sq ft), outside of the St Johns Town Center. 
« Last Edit: December 11, 2019, 01:58:28 PM by fieldafm »

MusicMan

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Re: Urban Construction Update - December 2019
« Reply #10 on: December 11, 2019, 03:48:16 PM »
Cindy394,

If you have people who are capable of salvage work I can arrange for you to speak with Arkest LLC owner to see what might be possible regarding removal of trims, doors, windows,  flooring etc... anything they deem worth saving. And yes the homes are available but of course there is a substantial cost to relocate. That being said at least the offer was made.

fieldafm

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Re: Urban Construction Update - December 2019
« Reply #11 on: December 11, 2019, 04:06:50 PM »
Cindy394,

If you have people who are capable of salvage work I can arrange for you to speak with Arkest LLC owner to see what might be possible regarding removal of trims, doors, windows,  flooring etc... anything they deem worth saving. And yes the homes are available but of course there is a substantial cost to relocate. That being said at least the offer was made.

To Cindy's credit, she has already done that and is trying every avenue for finding someone that would be capable and interested in moving any or all of the buildings on site. I think you missed her point entirely.

jcjohnpaint

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Re: Urban Construction Update - December 2019
« Reply #12 on: December 11, 2019, 09:06:55 PM »
Any movement on the old Jea building?

thelakelander

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Re: Urban Construction Update - December 2019
« Reply #13 on: December 11, 2019, 09:26:17 PM »
^It's in the process of getting DDRB approval. Renovations are supposed to begin in early 2020.
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MusicMan

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Re: Urban Construction Update - December 2019
« Reply #14 on: December 11, 2019, 11:24:38 PM »
Maybe... I did read her comment, and she seems to be asking why it's not included among construction projects.... and the answer is the same for The District: it hasn't started yet.

What I do know is: the buildings at 527 E Duval were on the market for a long time, a year or 2 (maybe more). Caldera had a vision, something we drastically need in Downtown, and took a HUGE RISK in buying them. No one else took that risk, not any of the "preservationist's" who wanted to keep the homes, even though they had ample opportunity to buy them and save them.  I applaud him for taking a risk in an area where everyone else passed up the opportunity, and where NOTHING is guaranteed.  There is plenty of risk ahead for this guy, where he is trying to create something beautiful and unique in an area that has been neglected for so very long. I will help him if I can. And I hope Cindy is able to salvage as much as possible from these buildings, or find some other structures to purchase and renovate.