Author Topic: History of Cedar Hills/Lakeshore  (Read 1160 times)

newfloridian83

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History of Cedar Hills/Lakeshore
« on: June 12, 2019, 03:18:24 PM »
I don't see Lakeshore listed as an area near downtown, so apologies if this is the wrong place.  I'm a recent transplant to Jax and am curious about the history of Lakeshore and Cedar Hills.  I bought a house built in 1951 on the Cedar River, and the deed calls the area "Lake Shore Manor," and I've been puzzled by that since the area on google maps calls the area Cedar Hills.  I can't find anything about this online and was wondering in a local may know more about the area or maybe how it evolved to what it is now.  Since the area is adjacent to Confederate Point, Cedar Hills, and Lakeshore, I'm never really sure where to tell people I live.  I've found one map that calls my little subdivision Cedar Forest, but that seems to not be a formal name?  Thanks for any insight!

acme54321

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Re: History of Cedar Hills/Lakeshore
« Reply #1 on: June 12, 2019, 03:54:26 PM »
Lakeshore Manor is probably what the specific developer called the project when platted in the 50s.  You aren't alone, the vast majority of properties are recorded like that.  Most people would call it Cedar Hills.
« Last Edit: June 12, 2019, 03:59:55 PM by acme54321 »

thelakelander

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Re: History of Cedar Hills/Lakeshore
« Reply #2 on: June 12, 2019, 04:30:56 PM »
"A man who views the world the same at 50 as he did at 20 has wasted 30 years of his life.” - Muhammad Ali

Josh

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Re: History of Cedar Hills/Lakeshore
« Reply #3 on: June 13, 2019, 09:41:45 AM »
The COJ Property Appraiser site lists a subdivision called "Lake Shore Manor S/P PT." I'm not sure what "S/P PT" entails, but it probably has something to do with what acme mentioned.

Those individual "subdivision" labels actually add a lot of character and history to the older neighborhoods in my opinion.

newfloridian83

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Re: History of Cedar Hills/Lakeshore
« Reply #4 on: June 17, 2019, 09:14:24 AM »
Thanks for the links.  I'm big into history so seeing all the older photos was really cool.  I saw two photos of houses in my neighborhood in the articles, so I guess it is Cedar Hills after all.  I wonder if anyone knows when that name came about.  If the developers named them Lake Shore Manor, I wonder if the area was originally just an expansion over the river and later developed the name.

The app Nextdoor still shows a lot more granularity in the areas that are all viewed as Cedar Hills in the article.  I'm hoping I'll stumble across the original builder of my home on the Cedar River.  I'd love to know more about the history, but the property records seem to only go back the last few owners.

https://nextdoor.com/neighborhood/cedarforest--jacksonville--fl/

Here are a few older articles regarding the history of these neighborhoods:

Lake Shore: https://www.metrojacksonville.com/article/2008-mar-urban-neighborhoods-lake-shore

Cedar Hills: https://www.metrojacksonville.com/article/2010-jun-suburban-jacksonville-exploring-cedar-hills

ricker

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Re: History of Cedar Hills/Lakeshore
« Reply #5 on: June 22, 2019, 11:07:58 PM »
Original poster: you may find this relevant as Cedar Hills sprang out of the same area aka Cedar Springs.
This information was provided by the local historic preservation commission. Thank you, Mr. McEachin.

History of Greater Lake Shore and Lakeside Park
Summary for the purposes of this historical context description, the Lake Shore area, as part of Colonial era land grants linked to Ortega and Riverside, is south of Fishweir Creek and triangular in shape specifically south of present-day San Juan Avenue, and is water-bound by the Ortega and Cedar Rivers to the east, south, and west. The area is also bordered by Murray Hill and Hillcrest to the north, Hyde Park to the west, with Cedar Hills, Confederate Point, Ortega south.
The area remained largely rural in character, sparingly populated until the first quarter of the twentieth century. Many plats that would later constitute the Lake Shore community were filed between 1908 and 1928; with ten separate plats filed in the few years between 1924 and 1928, by the Lakeshore Corporation and the Bayview Corporation under Beale C. and James S. Buck with Buck & Buck Realty. Although platted during the height of the Florida Land Boom with several model homes constructed throughout the area then known only as Lakeside Park, the western area of Lakeside Park did not densely develop and urbanize until the periods immediately before and after World War II. Residential growth was greatly stimulated by the opening of the Jacksonville Naval Air Station in 1940.
[*A recent discovery from an old map and tide charts predating Blanding, show what became Confederate Point, Cedar Forest, eastern Hyde Park, NE Cedar Hills, situated in "Lake Shore Estates"(or Manor) Present day Blanding, north of the Cedar Creek - hard to imagine - was originally a two-lane called St. John's Avenue which lead into town, long ago before the current flyover to Kent campus and Park Street was built, before Camp Blanding.]


Colonial Periods through the Nineteenth Century
 
Early settlement of what became Duval County was greatly influenced by the issuing of large land grants to encourage both settlement and economic development, a practice employed by both the Spanish and British during Colonial Periods. During the First Spanish Period (1565-1763), much of the present day communities of Ortega and Lake Shore were part of a large land grant made to Captain Antonio Felipe de Bustus. Known as the Hacienda de Ostule, this huge tract stretched from the Black Creek in present day Clay County north to the present site of Downtown Jacksonville.
During the twenty-year British period, some of this huge tract was included in a 2,000-acre land grant made to Abraham Jones. After establishing a plantation in the Ortega area, Abraham Jones accompanied noted naturalist, William Bartram, on his tour of the Ortega River, at that time called Maxton Creek. Jones’ plantation was abandoned by 1775. Before the end of the British Period, Jones’ plantation came to be occupied by Colonel Daniel McGirtt, who proved to be one of the most colorful figures in the early history of East Florida. After siding with the patriots during the American Revolution, McGirtts changed allegiance to the British, and began cattle and slave raids into the Georgia colony. McGirtts and his men soon expanded their raids to include both American and British plantations and settlements. After escaping captivity by the British governor of East Florida, McGirtts and his men, later called banditti by the Spanish, continued their raids during the Second Spanish Period (1784-1821). After being captured twice and sent to prison in Cuba, McGirrts was apprehended and imprisoned for the last time in 1797. Over time Maxton’s Creek became known as McGirrt’s Creek (now the Ortega River).
A significant early development in Lake Shore and Ortega dates to the Second Spanish Period (1784-1821) when Spanish Governor Juan Quesada granted 4,000 acres to Don Juan McQueen. In 1804 McQueen sold a plantation and the surrounding acreage on both shores of the tributaries to John Houston McIntosh. McIntosh renamed the plantation Ortega in honor of Judge Josef de Ortega, a Spanish magistrate. United States authorities, under terms of the Adams-Onis Treaty of 1819, confirmed legal title to McIntosh after the transfer of Florida from Spain in 1821. McIntosh died in 1836, and his daughter subsequently sold his holdings to Asa and Austin Moore. The Moores re-sold the property in 1857 to John P. Sanderson.

In 1902 Sanderson’s heirs sold part of the plantation to the Jacksonville Ortega Town Company headed by United States Senator Wilkinson Call (House still stands on Wilson Blvd.) The development was financed in part by a $50,000 loan from New York financier, J. Pierpont Morgan. Senator Call’s failing health temporarily curtailed the development of Ortega until 1906, when he sold the tract to J.N.C. Stockton’s Ortega Company.
[*This strategic tract was rectangular and included the land on the other banks of Butcher and Fishing Creeks and their confluence with the Cedar, Ortega Rivers, surrounding the western half of the inland island of Ortega, the side with the railroad. To visualize, approximate boundaries include present day Cedar Hills shopping center, northeast to include the cumpuses of Lake Shore middle and Bayview elementary, San Juan Ave, Riverside Village/ St. Matthew's - southeast to Roosevelt Publix, Bookmine, Loop area, Roosevelt through Ortega to Mulberry Point and Camp Johnston/modern day NASJAX - northwest along today's Ortega Farms Blvd /Confederate Point Rd /Cedar Hills Blvd.]

During the Civil War, the City of Jacksonville was occupied four times by Union forces with their navy controlling the St. Johns River and its tributaries during most of the conflict. Most military action in Duval County was skirmishes that occurred in the western part of the county directly connected to the city by rail and carriage roads. By the fourth occupation, the Confederates were concentrated at Camp Milton and Camp Finegan with the Union behind earthen defensive walls and redoubts constructed between Hogans Creek and McCoys Creek in the downtown area. One military engagement, “The Skirmish at Cedar Creek”, involved a force of 500 confederate soldiers, occurred on May 25, 1864 along present day Lenox Avenue between Cedar Creek and Memorial Park Road. (The Confederate Point neighborhood across Cedar Creek from Lake Shore was not associated with any known Civil War action, but reflects a more recent name given by developers of the area.)
 After the Civil War, Jacksonville soon regained its prominence as a major rail center with the expansion of existing lines and the opening of new ones. Chartered in 1875, the Jacksonville, Tampa & Key West Railroad (whose principal promoter was millionaire coal magnate Robert H. Coleman of Cornwall, Pennsylvania) started construction of a line in 1883 connecting Jacksonville to Palatka. In April of 1883, A.M. Reed signed a deed providing right-of-way for the railroad through the western edge of his property at Mulberry Point (now Yukon). The first train went by on March 6, 1884, and Reed had constructed an open shed along the track called Reed’s Landing or Reed’s Station that connected his Mulberry Grove plantation to Jacksonville through Lake Shore and Ortega by rail. The railroad was purchased by the Plant Investment Company in April of 1899 following a receivership, and was incorporated as part of the Savannah, Florida & Western Railway System, and was later merged with the Atlantic Coast Line Railroad after the death of Henry Plant. This is now the CSX “A-line".


Twentieth Century
Cedar Creek, a natural border around south and west Lake Shore, was by the early nineteenth century a major waterway connecting interior farms and plantations in southwest Duval County with other communities along the St. Johns River. Both the Cedar Creek and McGirts Creek (Ortega River) were also used to float logs to a sawmill that opened in 1912 on the current site of the Sadler Point Marina. Referred to by different sources as the Gress Lumber Company, Cummer Cypress Mill, and Morgan Mill, this facility included houses for workers and their families in nearby cottages constructed on the current site of the Roosevelt Square shopping center. A later account of the sawmill community described twelve to fifteen families living in single and double shotgun houses. Typical of the period, the sawmill community was served by a company store. Reportedly, the mill was destroyed by fire and had closed down by 1955.
Near the sawmill along Lake Shore Boulevard was Huckins Yacht Corporation that opened in 1945, as well as the home of early settler, Carl Warden Sr., a Russian immigrant who purchased his creek front property in 1910. A man of many talents, Warden was a master boat builder, farmer, carpenter, and according to local legend, moonshiner northwest of Lake Shore (Lakeside Park) on a tributary, Wills Branch, splits off from the Cedar River where a spring was the focal point of a planned community during the first decade of the twentieth century. This planned development around the Lackawanna Springs, also called the Lackawanna Run, included a hotel and park site, bottling works, poultry plant, and yacht dock.
Living at Lackawanna Springs as early as 1908, James Holloman was the secretary and treasurer of the Jacksonville Development Company, as well as the president of the Lackawanna Hotel Company and the Lackawanna Poultry Supplies. Local historian, William Jones, described the springs as a health resort established by Auleno Holloman. The resort consisted of a boathouse, spring house, wading pool, guest house, and lush walking paths. Many of the buildings associated with the resort were still intact in the late 1930s. The bottling works was operated by the Lackawanna Water Company, under J. A. Grizzard, president and manager, O. H. Wright, vice president, and E. S. Moore, secretary. Lackawanna spring water was quite popular requiring a distribution center in Downtown Jacksonville where water was delivered by a motorized delivery truck. Reportedly, the Lackawanna Water Company enclosed part of the spring which steadily flowed 30,000 gallons daily, with marble and iron to improve its appearance and access. After abandonment of the resort, Lackawanna Springs became a favorite swimming hole and picnic spot for many west side residents. Publications at the time of its development not only heralded the physical beauty of the area surrounding the springs and its associated wide and graded avenues, but also its potential for horticultural uses such as truck farms and orchards that would serve the growing Jacksonville market. The Jacksonville Development Company subdivided much of the area, which was referred to as being part of a grand old estate, into one-acre tracts in order to attract those wishing to have a large home site with adequate space for vegetable gardens, flower beds, and chicken yards. The home sites appeared to be quite desirable, with a company publication reporting that fifty-two lots were sold in the first two hours of the land sale. Lackawanna Springs was described as being accessible from Downtown Jacksonville by a brick paved road (Lenox Avenue, Black Creek Road, and Lackawanna Avenue). Because Lackawanna Avenue, later Edison Avenue, was the major thoroughfare through the neighborhood north of Riverside, it became recognized by the name, Lackawanna.

Significant residential development to the immediate north and east of Lake Shore that encroached on the rural tranquility of the area came from population growth pushing outward from Riverside, Avondale, Ortega, and Murray Hill. This process of commercial development and densification was particularly accelerated by the opening of Camp Blanding in Clay County, and the opening of Cecil Field, as well as the aforementioned Jacksonville Naval Air Station, which itself grew out of Camp Johnston on the same riverfront site spanning Mulberry Grove on McGirtts Creek, later known as Ortega River west of present-day Yukon, all the way east to the St. Johns.
As early as 1908 and 1911, a parcel of land along the Cedar River Creek west of Lake Shore was platted several times for residential development. However these earlier plats, Johnson & Hyde’s Subdivision and Cedar Springs, were incorporated into a new plat filed in October of 1926 by the Hyde Park Company under Forrest J. Hyde, president, and Mildred Hyde Riles, secretary. Partially bounded by the Cedar River and Lackawanna Run (Wills Branch), the focal point of the New Hyde Park Subdivision was a golf course designed by the famed Donald Ross, a nationally recognized pioneer golf course designer. Preceding the filing of the plat by a year, the golf course opened and was operated by the Hyde Park Country Club, a private club organized in February of 1925.
Located across the Cedar Creek, the presence of this golf course and country club was used to promote the 1925 opening of the Bayview neighborhood in Lakeside Park of Lake Shore. The first recorded plat in what is now the oldest residential neighborhood of single family homes in the Greater Lake Shore area of Jacksonville in Duval County, was Lakeside Park. Water-bound south of San Juan Avenue (which was previously Gulf Street) the Bayview area of Lakeside Park was opened by the Riverside Realty Company in 1908 directed by W. M. Stimson and Robert E. Wood. This large triangular shaped subdivision, which included approximately 590 acres ran from the first bend on the Cedar River (just south of San Juan Avenue) north of the St. Johns Avenue bridge (Old Orange Park Road, now Blanding Boulevard) east to the St. Johns River. Lakeside Park included street names still used today, including Lake Shore Boulevard extending south and west from Herschel Street (where the street car line ran), Hamilton Street south from Murray Hill, Fair Street, Euclid Street, Jersey Street, Stinson Street, Vista Avenue, and St. Johns Avenue. The east-west streets were originally numbered 62nd to 80th Streets, consistent with the treatment of such streets in old neighborhoods north of Downtown and in the Old Jacksonville Heights area a few miles south and west of Lake Shore.
The 1908 plat identified several parcels under private ownership with the largest being the property of Philip Prioleau. This large parcel, which stretched from Lake Shore Boulevard west to St. Johns Avenue (now Blanding Boulevard), is now the home of both the Bayview elementary and Lake Shore middle schools, the community garden, baseball fields, community pool, and track. At the immediate northwest corner of the Lake Side Park Plat is a large parcel along the Cedar Creek at present-day San Juan Avenue, which is identified as a hotel site. Also depicted on this site is a spring that fed into the Cedar Creek.
The 1918 USGS Topographic Map of Jacksonville depicts the Old Orange Park Road, which was also depicted in the 1914 plat as St. Johns Avenue, and the only educational institution identified in the Lake Shore area at that time was the “Flagler Preparatory School for Girls” at the aforementioned spring on the east side of the Cedar River where San Juan Avenue now crosses. Probably located on the former hotel site, this school was listed in the City Directory as being located in Cedar Springs.

Although South Florida received the lion’s share of development, virtually every section of the state experienced significant growth during the boom. Jacksonville became a primary departure point for visitors entering Florida. In early 1925 some 20-25 trains were arriving in the city each day and The Chamber of Commerce reported that over 150,000 automobiles passed over the (Acosta) St. Johns River Bridge during Spring. In July 1925 alone, building permits issued totaled $1,177,383, ranking Jacksonville sixth in the state in new construction behind the major cities of the southern peninsula. Although drawn in 1913, a re-plat of part of Lakeside Park was filed in 1923 by the New Riverside Realty Company under the direction of C. Downing and Louis R. Fendig. Called Lake Shore Drive Lots, this new subdivision appeared to have been incorporated into later plats of the area, and resulted in the deep estate sized parcels along the waterfront today.

Much of the current compact physical design of the Lake Shore of today resulted from a series of plats filed during the Florida Land Boom of the 1920s. A significant part of the old Lake Side Park plat was re-platted and centered around both sides of St. Johns Avenue (Blanding Boulevard) at San Juan Avenue where the commercial heart of the community still remains today. Buck & Buck Realty successfully included a distinctive boulevard called Bayview, designed to include a central commons as a linear median park space for horticultural uses, health and well-being. At the northern termination of Bayview near St. Johns Avenue, six arched Spanish Mission style entryway gates and monument, all replete with flowing fountain and gas lanterns, were constructed and finished by 1925. Large and elaborate decorative gateways and entryway monuments, usually with a Mediterranean design influence, were the hallmark of many upscale communities of the Florida Land Boom of the 1920s, meant to honor and celebrated the history and heritage of the time, much like the remaining half of these structures unique to Lake Shore in Jacksonville. By January of 1925, new water and electrical lines had been installed with plans for twenty miles of paved streets and thirty miles of landscaped sidewalks planned. Representatives of Buck & Buck Realty emphasized the employment of professional engineers, landscape architects, and nursery men in planning the physical layout of the development of the community. New streets as exemplified by Bayview would also include a ten foot grassy right-of-way between the sidewalks and the curb where rows of palms still thrive today. Also in January of 1925, the newspaper reported that the foundation of a “Spanish Style Bungalow” had been laid by local contractors, A. J. Cone and Henry A. Halsema with another in the design process. The developers also announced that more homes of Spanish architecture were being planned as designed by the Suburban Homes Company. The articles went on to state that a variety of architectural styles in addition to Spanish Revival would allow for homes of all sizes in the design of new homes. Several two-story homes, each unique in style and materials used ranging from brick, stucco over hollow clay tile, old growth heart pine, were constructed prior to 1925, and still stand proudly today. Some include upstairs sleeping porches. Like Riverside, Avondale, and Ortega, Lake Shore attracted buyers from Maine, Nebraska, New York, New Jersey, and Ohio. A 1925 article noted that one of the principal owners of Lake Shore was Augustus Anthony, President of the Peoples Bank who resided in an impressive grand manor style home in Riverside.
Originally, streets planned for 250 acres of the Estates of Greater Lake Shore would be inspired by English landmarks as reflected in the names Westbury, Essex, Durham, Brighton, Kent, Somerset, Stratfordshire, Shenstone, Isleworth, Wilton, Avon, Pembridge, and Suffolk. With the financially disastrous bust of the boom during the mid 1920s, many subdivisions such as Lake Shore, Venetia, San Jose Estates, did not reach their full potential, and for the most part remained undeveloped until new residential construction again became active during the 1940s and 50s. Thanks to the opening of NAS JAX, Camp Blanding, and St. Johns River Shipbuilding, Lake Shore recovered with the completion of a second complementary development platted in 1941 in response to the housing shortage for Naval officers with the opening of Riverdale Gardens.
« Last Edit: June 23, 2019, 08:29:00 AM by ricker »

Charles Hunter

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Re: History of Cedar Hills/Lakeshore
« Reply #6 on: June 23, 2019, 08:39:36 AM »
Fascinating article.  I grew up in two different houses north of San Juan, and south of Park, on streets intersecting Cassatt.  I always thought that was part of Lake Shore, but, from the article, I guess not.

ricker

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Re: History of Cedar Hills/Lakeshore
« Reply #7 on: June 23, 2019, 04:08:57 PM »
If the Cardinal-Janice Cir- Quan family area, maybe part of the old Richardson estate?

Charles Hunter

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Re: History of Cedar Hills/Lakeshore
« Reply #8 on: June 23, 2019, 05:51:32 PM »
Just north of San Juan - Shirley and Irvington - near the Rollerdrome

newfloridian83

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Re: History of Cedar Hills/Lakeshore
« Reply #9 on: June 26, 2019, 09:50:59 AM »
Original poster: you may find this relevant as Cedar Hills sprang out of the same area aka Cedar Springs.
This information was provided by the local historic preservation commission. Thank you, Mr. McEachin.

History of Greater Lake Shore and Lakeside Park

[*A recent discovery from an old map and tide charts predating Blanding, show what became Confederate Point, Cedar Forest, eastern Hyde Park, NE Cedar Hills, situated in "Lake Shore Estates"(or Manor) Present day Blanding, north of the Cedar Creek - hard to imagine - was originally a two-lane called St. John's Avenue which lead into town, long ago before the current flyover to Kent campus and Park Street was built, before Camp Blanding.]


What a fascinating read! Does this old map exist somewhere online? I'd love to see it.  I live in that Cedar Forest development, which only includes 4 streets, so I can't really find anything about it.   Google Maps and Apple Maps don't even show that it exists, but I've seen it on a few other sites mapped out as just my neighborhood.

Thanks again for the great info! I love learning about my new area.