Author Topic: City seeks $8 million from Legislature for downtown housing  (Read 2102 times)

thelakelander

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City seeks $8 million from Legislature for downtown housing
« on: April 09, 2019, 01:58:46 PM »
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City seeks $8 million from Legislature for downtown housing

For the second year in a row, the city of Jacksonville is angling for millions of dollars from the state Legislature for downtown development.

Last year, the city got $12.5 million to pay roughly one-third of the cost for tearing down a piece of the elevated ramp between the Hart Bridge and downtown, a demolition project tied to opening up the riverfront for new construction near the sports complex.

This session, the city wants $8 million for expanding "workforce housing" in downtown. That could give a second life to the vacant three-story Community Connections building, which got its start in 1950 as a YWCA that served as a residential way-station for young women coming to the "big city."

That YWCA era is long gone, but the building could become home to downtown workers if the state Legislature agrees with the local funding request.

The bid for state support faces some hurdles.

Full article: https://www.jacksonville.com/news/20190408/city-seeks-8-million-from-legislature-for-downtown-housing
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jaxjags

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Re: City seeks $8 million from Legislature for downtown housing
« Reply #1 on: April 09, 2019, 02:16:58 PM »
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City seeks $8 million from Legislature for downtown housing

For the second year in a row, the city of Jacksonville is angling for millions of dollars from the state Legislature for downtown development.

Last year, the city got $12.5 million to pay roughly one-third of the cost for tearing down a piece of the elevated ramp between the Hart Bridge and downtown, a demolition project tied to opening up the riverfront for new construction near the sports complex.

This session, the city wants $8 million for expanding "workforce housing" in downtown. That could give a second life to the vacant three-story Community Connections building, which got its start in 1950 as a YWCA that served as a residential way-station for young women coming to the "big city."

That YWCA era is long gone, but the building could become home to downtown workers if the state Legislature agrees with the local funding request.

The bid for state support faces some hurdles.

Full article: https://www.jacksonville.com/news/20190408/city-seeks-8-million-from-legislature-for-downtown-housing

I have no issue with kids getting a modern facility with probably better tech infrastructure and meets todays building codes. But why demo. Convert to apartments. Affordable apartments. Seriously, Vestcor could make into work place/affordable housing IF the price of the land/building is low. I lived in a converted old elementary school with a simple but nice loft apartment years ago. It was great.

jaxjags

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Re: City seeks $8 million from Legislature for downtown housing
« Reply #2 on: April 09, 2019, 02:19:11 PM »
Quote
City seeks $8 million from Legislature for downtown housing

For the second year in a row, the city of Jacksonville is angling for millions of dollars from the state Legislature for downtown development.

Last year, the city got $12.5 million to pay roughly one-third of the cost for tearing down a piece of the elevated ramp between the Hart Bridge and downtown, a demolition project tied to opening up the riverfront for new construction near the sports complex.

This session, the city wants $8 million for expanding "workforce housing" in downtown. That could give a second life to the vacant three-story Community Connections building, which got its start in 1950 as a YWCA that served as a residential way-station for young women coming to the "big city."

That YWCA era is long gone, but the building could become home to downtown workers if the state Legislature agrees with the local funding request.

The bid for state support faces some hurdles.

Full article: https://www.jacksonville.com/news/20190408/city-seeks-8-million-from-legislature-for-downtown-housing

I have no issue with kids getting a modern facility with probably better tech infrastructure and meets todays building codes. But why demo. Convert to apartments. Affordable apartments. Seriously, Vestcor could make into work place/affordable housing IF the price of the land/building is low. I lived in a converted old elementary school with a simple but nice loft apartment years ago. It was great.

sorry, wrong thread. Meant to be a comment to Ribault and Raines HS.

MusicMan

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Re: City seeks $8 million from Legislature for downtown housing
« Reply #3 on: April 09, 2019, 09:22:18 PM »
Not sure I understand this request, haven't we had several work force housing projects completed recently or under construction now?

Kerry

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Re: City seeks $8 million from Legislature for downtown housing
« Reply #4 on: April 09, 2019, 10:57:42 PM »
I wish Jacksonville would get with the times and stop segregated housing.  Just pass a City ordinance that 10% of all multi-family has to be reserved for workforce housing.
« Last Edit: April 09, 2019, 10:59:45 PM by Kerry »
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tufsu1

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Re: City seeks $8 million from Legislature for downtown housing
« Reply #5 on: April 10, 2019, 06:20:13 PM »
Not sure I understand this request, haven't we had several work force housing projects completed recently or under construction now?

yes - the issue here is that the YWCA building restoration/conversion costs more than could be recouped by affordable housing - so of course, ask taxpayers for a handout.

marcuscnelson

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Re: City seeks $8 million from Legislature for downtown housing
« Reply #6 on: April 10, 2019, 11:43:36 PM »
yes - the issue here is that the YWCA building restoration/conversion costs more than could be recouped by affordable housing - so of course, ask taxpayers for a handout.

So the solution here would be to make that YWCA project market rate, right? Because if it isn't feasible without subsidies, what else is supposed to happen?

Bill Hoff

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Re: City seeks $8 million from Legislature for downtown housing
« Reply #7 on: April 11, 2019, 08:00:00 AM »
yes - the issue here is that the YWCA building restoration/conversion costs more than could be recouped by affordable housing - so of course, ask taxpayers for a handout.

So the solution here would be to make that YWCA project market rate, right? Because if it isn't feasible without subsidies, what else is supposed to happen?

These workforce / affordable housing projects all recieve tax credits from the state to make it financially attractive to the developer. No tax credit, no such housing projects. However, this particular project involves renovating a large, old structure, which is more costly than a typical workforce / affordable housing project. So, they want to bridge that financial gap.

vicupstate

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Re: City seeks $8 million from Legislature for downtown housing
« Reply #8 on: April 11, 2019, 08:21:38 AM »
I wish Jacksonville would get with the times and stop segregated housing.  Just pass a City ordinance that 10% of all multi-family has to be reserved for workforce housing.

You can accomplish essentially the same thiing but with a carrot rather than a stick. Just require every unit built over and above what code allows, to be workforce or affordable housing. That is what Charleston does. That does more in terms of quantity than the other things they have implemented.   
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fieldafm

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Re: City seeks $8 million from Legislature for downtown housing
« Reply #9 on: April 11, 2019, 08:50:08 AM »
yes - the issue here is that the YWCA building restoration/conversion costs more than could be recouped by affordable housing - so of course, ask taxpayers for a handout.

So the solution here would be to make that YWCA project market rate, right? Because if it isn't feasible without subsidies, what else is supposed to happen?

These workforce / affordable housing projects all recieve tax credits from the state to make it financially attractive to the developer. No tax credit, no such housing projects. However, this particular project involves renovating a large, old structure, which is more costly than a typical workforce / affordable housing project. So, they want to bridge that financial gap.

Struck out the 'financially attractive' statement. Without the LIHTC tax credit, these projects simply could not exist by charging well below market rate rents, given the cost to construct these projects.

Further down the page on this link https://www.thejaxsonmag.com/article/affordable-housing-development-proposed-in-brooklyn-page-2/, there is a basic primer on how the LIHTC works.
« Last Edit: April 11, 2019, 09:04:56 AM by fieldafm »

fieldafm

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Re: City seeks $8 million from Legislature for downtown housing
« Reply #10 on: April 11, 2019, 09:02:13 AM »
I wish Jacksonville would get with the times and stop segregated housing.  Just pass a City ordinance that 10% of all multi-family has to be reserved for workforce housing.

You can accomplish essentially the same thiing but with a carrot rather than a stick. Just require every unit built over and above what code allows, to be workforce or affordable housing. That is what Charleston does. That does more in terms of quantity than the other things they have implemented.   

The 'SoBa' apartments going up at the edge of the Southbank behind Tidbits does have a 10% set-aside for workforce housing. That was a condition of the incentive package the developer received from DIA.

There is very little evidence that shows that inclusionary zoning actually works as intended. Most data I read (and this is what I do for a living) indicates that while inclusionary zoning helps a select few... that on a broader macro-level basis, these policies generally drive up building prices, increase housing prices, decrease overall supply of housing and decreases equitable access to affordable housing.

There is a movement now at the State legislature to ban this practice. See here: http://floridapolitics.com/archives/293225-affordable-housing-hb-7103. While politicians in Tallahassee seemingly love efforts to restrict home rule influence, this particular effort could have far-reaching consequences in land use policy beyond just affordable housing policies. One could argue that things like density bonuses (particularly prevalent in form-based codes) would also come under fire if this bill is enacted.

While I'm not convinced that inclusionary zoning in relation to affordable housing is good policy or not, I do have major concerns about taking away local communities' ability to enact land use policies that are appropriate for the individual wants and needs of a community.
« Last Edit: April 11, 2019, 09:13:17 AM by fieldafm »

thelakelander

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OldOrangeHause

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Re: City seeks $8 million from Legislature for downtown housing
« Reply #12 on: June 22, 2019, 03:11:21 PM »
^I'm not surprised. They've already completed projects, yet they felt the need to start another.

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Re: City seeks $8 million from Legislature for downtown housing
« Reply #13 on: June 23, 2019, 09:23:14 PM »
I don't like DeSantis. What does he have against Northeast Florida? (or so it seems, I might be wrong). We'll see what he does in the future for upcoming funding requests for Jacksonville. Miami and Fort Lauderdale need nothing, or very little in my opinion. Seems he's favoring central and south Florida over North Florida. Again, I could be wrong. Don't know why the Curry Administration is lauding and praising him. (sucking up?). But if our leaders did their jobs, we probably wouldn't have to ask this Governor for much at all. I don't like him.
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thelakelander

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Re: City seeks $8 million from Legislature for downtown housing
« Reply #14 on: June 23, 2019, 10:11:42 PM »
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"My view on the housing fund is that’s never been done before -- earmark specific projects," DeSantis said when asked specifically about that veto. "I appreciate what Jacksonville is doing. I think that if they revitalize downtown, that would be a neat thing to do and more affordable housing would be good. But I also know that Miami has acute problems. Fort Lauderdale has acute problems. And if someone was to ask me, 'Why Jacksonville earmark but not Miami or Fort Lauderdale?' I wouldn’t have had an answer for that. So I think we should just stick with the process. I was leery about setting a new precedent and I think we’ll probably be better off."

^This is the reason he gave for denying the funding request. It's hard to argue against his point about not wanting to set a precedent.
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