Author Topic: DCPS Seeks Public Input On School Changes, Closures  (Read 1595 times)

thelakelander

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Re: DCPS Seeks Public Input On School Changes, Closures
« Reply #15 on: April 09, 2019, 03:43:49 PM »
That would appear to suggest that they got a large amount of feedback from those community surveys that said those schools/areas won't even consider demolish, which will feed into the cost estimates. I believe that was the point of the community feedback period.

Of course. Except online surveys aren't necessarily an effective form of outreach for underrepresented communities. Just recently led a public engagement project for a poor rural community about a hour outside of Houston. Most people didn't have the things we tend to take for granted like cell phones with unlimited data plans, computers, web access, etc.
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Bill Hoff

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Re: DCPS Seeks Public Input On School Changes, Closures
« Reply #16 on: April 09, 2019, 05:29:07 PM »

Do you have a link to her statement?

No, was in an email. Here it is:

Dear Team Duval,

We asked for your feedback, and you delivered. With almost 8,800 video views and more than 1,600 survey comments, we received clear input on our master facility plan to provide all of our students and staff with outstanding instructional environments.

New or significantly improved school environments are vital for enhancing student learning and school culture. State of the art schools also improve economic development and property values. Our district’s school buildings are the oldest in the state, and with declining maintenance and renovation funds, we need to take bold steps on behalf of our students.

While the bulk of the proposed plan received minimal commentary, several of the school-by-school scenarios drew comments that require further community engagement.

We will work to find solutions that can meet the needs of future students and address current community feedback. The scenarios that remain under discussion include:

·         J. Allen Axson/Chets Creek Elementary schools
·         Venetia/Ortega Elementary schools
·         Ribault High School/Ribault Middle School
·         Raines High School/Northwestern Middle School
·         Jefferson Davis Middle School

We will continue the conversation on these scenarios in various ways. In some of these instances, I will hold more dialog in the school community to better understand concerns. In others, we will conduct additional surveys to evaluate potential alternatives.

We have already made some changes to the master plan based on this round of surveys:

·         We will preserve the historic architecture of Kirby-Smith Middle and Loretto Elementary in the replacement process, and
·         We will meet the need for a middle school in fast developing southeastern Duval by making the proposed new K-5 into a K-8.

I want to extend my thanks to all who have participated in this process. While we need to be dynamic in meeting the needs of our students, the best plan can only be achieved by considering all perspectives. I will keep you informed as the process unfolds, and I encourage you to stay engaged throughout the process.

Kind regards,

Diana Greene
Superintendent
Duval County Public Schools

Captain Zissou

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Re: DCPS Seeks Public Input On School Changes, Closures
« Reply #17 on: April 10, 2019, 09:37:35 AM »
What tax bucket does the funding for the school board come from?  Would these come from that budget or a separate capital improvement pool?  Is that why they are proposing demolish/rebuild, so that they can pull from capital funds not their own operating budget?

FlaBoy

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Re: DCPS Seeks Public Input On School Changes, Closures
« Reply #18 on: April 10, 2019, 10:34:31 AM »
What tax bucket does the funding for the school board come from?  Would these come from that budget or a separate capital improvement pool?  Is that why they are proposing demolish/rebuild, so that they can pull from capital funds not their own operating budget?

Property taxes. They have taxing authority that they can levy up to a certain amount. Likewise, there are taxes that flow up to the state and back to the district. A majority of all property taxes go to the schools.

For this, they would be looking for an increased mill on top of that or a half cent sales tax, or both.

itsfantastic1

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Re: DCPS Seeks Public Input On School Changes, Closures
« Reply #19 on: April 10, 2019, 12:31:59 PM »
I believe they said increasing the millage the amount they think they can "get approved" would result in about $900 million over the 10 years, which doesn't quite cover it all. This seems to imply they are looking at multiple revenue streams; some of which are taxes (sales), others which may be service fee based or even increasing CDD fees for newer developments that drive the need for newer school.

So we'll see...

Charles Hunter

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Re: DCPS Seeks Public Input On School Changes, Closures
« Reply #20 on: April 12, 2019, 09:05:03 PM »
What is the experience with schools with grades 6 through 12 in urban areas?  Parents are going to have serious concerns about having 11 year olds in the same building as 18 year olds.  Does the consultant's report cover those concerns? Or is it just about the physical plants?

Steve

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Re: DCPS Seeks Public Input On School Changes, Closures
« Reply #21 on: April 15, 2019, 12:14:12 PM »
What is the experience with schools with grades 6 through 12 in urban areas?  Parents are going to have serious concerns about having 11 year olds in the same building as 18 year olds.  Does the consultant's report cover those concerns? Or is it just about the physical plants?

Probably depends on the physical structure and how it’s done. Episcopal is one of the most expensive private schools in Jacksonville, yet has 7-12. Bolles on the other hand has K-5 and 9-12 on their main campus (though completely separated I believe), and 6-8 at a different campus.

Bill Hoff

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Re: DCPS Seeks Public Input On School Changes, Closures
« Reply #22 on: April 15, 2019, 12:19:00 PM »
What is the experience with schools with grades 6 through 12 in urban areas?  Parents are going to have serious concerns about having 11 year olds in the same building as 18 year olds.  Does the consultant's report cover those concerns? Or is it just about the physical plants?

Darnell Cookman has been a combined middle & highschool for quite a few years now, and its consistently highly rated/desirable.

acme54321

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Re: DCPS Seeks Public Input On School Changes, Closures
« Reply #23 on: April 15, 2019, 12:54:03 PM »
I went to a school (private) that was 6-12 and the middle and high school were pretty segregated.  There wasn't much interaction if any between the students.  Different lunch times, break, buildings, etc.  They even switched classes at a different time if I remeber correctly.

Charles Hunter

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Re: DCPS Seeks Public Input On School Changes, Closures
« Reply #24 on: April 15, 2019, 02:20:35 PM »
Yeah, but does anyone have confidence that DCPS can pull off what competitive private schools, and a competitive magnet school, are doing?  Would there be separate administrations for the Middle and High Schools on the same campus?  Why not set them up as separate schools on the same campus?  There are a few examples in Duval County of different level schools having adjacent campuses.  Some have public roads between them (Paxson High and James Weldon Johnson Middle - both academic magnets, and Biltmore Elementary; and Terry Parker High, Arlington Middle, and Parkwood Elementary.  One of the targets in the consultant report, Ribault High, Ribault Middle, and Sallye Mathis Elementary, share a large "campus" with no public roads crossing through.  If this is the model they are considering, it would be less concerning than "11 year olds with 18 year olds" fears reported on TV.

thelakelander

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Re: DCPS Seeks Public Input On School Changes, Closures
« Reply #25 on: April 15, 2019, 02:25:03 PM »
My main question is what happens economically to the neighborhoods that lose their elementary and middle school?

One of the targets in the consultant report, Ribault High, Ribault Middle, and Sallye Mathis Elementary, share a large "campus" with no public roads crossing through.  If this is the model they are considering, it would be less concerning than "11 year olds with 18 year olds" fears reported on TV.

Ribault is one of the two schools they are talking about consolidating into 6-12. DCPS has more space than students. Part of this consolidation thing is to reduce the amount of square footage and capacity they have.
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itsfantastic1

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Re: DCPS Seeks Public Input On School Changes, Closures
« Reply #26 on: April 24, 2019, 11:27:30 AM »
Looks like it's out that a sales tax increase is the prefered way. What's interesting is that it appears the school district is quite hampered to get money from various funding sources.

"We’ve utilized every opportunity for other ways of getting additional revenue such as bonding."

"The district has two funding options to take to voters: approve a half-cent sales tax or raise the district’s property tax rate. However, the board hasn’t considered a property tax increase because that revenue can only be used for operating expenses."

Interesting that a property tax hike can only be used for operating expenses, but I think that needs to be discussed as well otherwise we'll end up with another $1B backlog in 20 years.

https://www.jacksonville.com/news/20190423/duval-voters-to-decide-on-proposed-sales-tax-referendum-to-pay-for-replacing-repairing-renovating-schools

Charles Hunter

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Re: DCPS Seeks Public Input On School Changes, Closures
« Reply #27 on: April 24, 2019, 12:17:01 PM »
As someone noted elsewhere -
As there is no election scheduled in November 2019, how much will this Special Election cost?
What kind of turn-out can be expected?
Does this give DCPS time to educate voters on the needs?
... and to overcome the opposition based on combining certain Middle and High Schools into 6-12 schools?
Teachers and staff are underpaid, and routine maintenance has a huge backlog (hence, some of the replacement needs); will DCPS consider a millage increase to address these needs?

jaxjags

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Re: DCPS Seeks Public Input On School Changes, Closures
« Reply #28 on: April 24, 2019, 01:17:45 PM »
+1000 This tax is destined to be turned down by voters without:

1. A complete and comprehensive plan that includes long term maintenance  and teacher compensation.

2. Proper presentation of the plan to voters

3. Time to educate voters of the needs and solutions.

Hopefully they plan to do this, but November will be here quick.