Author Topic: JTA Hires Former Amazon Exec To Oversee U2C Program  (Read 3207 times)

bl8jaxnative

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Re: JTA Hires Former Amazon Exec To Oversee U2C Program
« Reply #45 on: February 02, 2019, 03:40:33 PM »
The biggest driver of sprawl in zoning policies and transportation infrastructure investment. You invest billions in 9Bs and First Coast Beltways in the middle of cow pastures owned by politically connected landowners....expect sprawl. 

You're being silly.   It cost 1/4 of a billion, not billions.   The development on Race Trac, Durbin Park, et al. was there long before FL 9B was finalized.   The freeway followed the development, not vice versa.



More so it ignores the hundreds of billions spent in the city core over the last generation.   If spending money on infrastructure then people would be building there.  But they're not.

If you want to reduce sprawl start with 2 things:

a) Address violent crime - People want to feel safe
b) Approach Public Schools like Sweden - Money for students follows the student, no matter what school they _choose_.

If you can do that, you'll get more people who will put up with mediocre closet space, poorly built structures, tiny yards, stray cats, panhandling, etc, etc, etc.   

Schools are especially important for young and soon to be parents.  Current paradigm is that there is school choice based on where you want to live.  More recently we've added the twist of "or where you're willing to haul them" which isn't much better.     Northern St. John's County has the best schools in the region.   Until there are meaningful improvements to public education, people will continue to move their seeking those great schools.

thelakelander

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Re: JTA Hires Former Amazon Exec To Oversee U2C Program
« Reply #46 on: February 02, 2019, 07:49:44 PM »
The biggest driver of sprawl in zoning policies and transportation infrastructure investment. You invest billions in 9Bs and First Coast Beltways in the middle of cow pastures owned by politically connected landowners....expect sprawl. 

You're being silly.   It cost 1/4 of a billion, not billions.   The development on Race Trac, Durbin Park, et al. was there long before FL 9B was finalized.   The freeway followed the development, not vice versa.

You're wrong in your first couple of statements, which screws over the foundation of the rest of your response. So I'll address each topic separately. First, 9B has been proposed since the 1970s:

https://www.metrojacksonville.com/article/2010-may-getting-to-know-state-road-9b-i-795

Heck, I even have a 1990s Dolphs map of Florida that shows proposed highways like the Central Florida Greeneway, Wekiva Parkway, and 9B years before funding was obtained to construct them. I actually do this stuff for a living. These things just don't pop up out of the blue due to recent development. Highways like 9B and the First Coast Expressway take decades of lobbying and planning to get built.

Here's two major developments that would not have been possible without 9B:

Durbin Park ( http://gatlindevelopmentcompany.propertycapsule.com/properties/DurbinPark/#overview )


Durbin Park is still largely undeveloped. There's no Durbin Park without the access provided to it with the $80 million extension of SR 9B from I-95 to CR 2209 and the interchange that came with it. Without 9B, that long delayed Bass Pro Sports would never happen as well.





E-Town ( https://www.etownjax.com/ )



E-Town, which is now under construction, would be virtually impossible to develop without SR 9B. Well before the road was built, the land in the middle of the cow pasture was rezoned for commercial development. When the first phase of SR 9B finally came along, it included a ghost interchange for what would become E-Town. I'd have to dig to find it, but there's a forum thread here about this that predates 9B's construction. Anyway, now with 9B open, the land owner is moving forward with developing their once isolated property that now has prime highway access paid for by $75 million in public funds, that will also be maintained with public dollars going forward.





For extra credit, here's one more than wouldn't get off the ground without the construction of the First Coast Expressway. The road isn't anywhere close to having all the funding to be extended to I-95 any time soon and plans have long been in the works to develop land around it whenever it comes on-line:

Silverleaf






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More so it ignores the hundreds of billions spent in the city core over the last generation.   If spending money on infrastructure then people would be building there.  But they're not.

You're on the wrong path if you're viewing my input as core vs suburban debates. IMO, people should be allowed to live anywhere they want. I focus more on making sure we make more fiscally sustainable public investments and land use decisions. We can do a better job of how we invest in all types of contextual environments.

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If you want to reduce sprawl start with 2 things:

a) Address violent crime - People want to feel safe

Violent crime is a result....not the cause.  Some of the best ways to permanently address violent crime is through economic development, access to jobs, education opportunities tailored to the context and incremental development of built environments designed to promote safety. Until the cause is addressed, it doesn't matter how much money is thrown at the result. With that said, violent crime has little to nothing to do with sprawl.  There's examples of sprawl development in Jax that also happen to be pockets of violent crime activities.


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b) Approach Public Schools like Sweden - Money for students follows the student, no matter what school they _choose_.

Stanton is one of the top public high schools in the country. Yet, the neighborhood around it struggles economically. Are you saying its curriculum should be changed to something Sweden does?

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ORLANDO, Fla. — Stanton College Preparatory School is among seven Florida high schools ranked in the top 50 public high schools in the country, according to a new ranking.

U.S. News & World Report on Tuesday placed schools stretching from Miami to Sarasota to Jacksonville on its list of the nation’s best public high schools.

Stanton finished as Florida’s sixth-ranked public high school and the 36th-ranked public high school in the country.

Florida’s top ranked public high school was Pine View School near Sarasota, which was ranked No. 13 nationwide. It was followed by Design and Architecture Senior High School in Miami, International Studies Charter High School in Miami and International Studies Preparatory in nearby Coral Gables.

Rounding out the list were Westshore Junior/Senior High School along the Space Coast, Stanton in Jacksonville and Edgewood Junior/Senior High School, also along the Space Coast.

Full article: https://www.jacksonville.com/news/education/2017-04-25/us-news-world-report-stanton-among-50-best-public-high-schools-country


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If you can do that, you'll get more people who will put up with mediocre closet space, poorly built structures, tiny yards, stray cats, panhandling, etc, etc, etc.

To have a serious discussion about development, you have to put personal biases aside. This statement pretty much discredits your solutions. It's fine to not like a certain type of development pattern or building style. However, the things you describe here are present in all types of built environments. Half the tract home subdivisions off Race Track Road are poorly built, have tiny yards and mediocre closet space. 

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Schools are especially important for young and soon to be parents.  Current paradigm is that there is school choice based on where you want to live.  More recently we've added the twist of "or where you're willing to haul them" which isn't much better.     Northern St. John's County has the best schools in the region.   Until there are meaningful improvements to public education, people will continue to move their seeking those great schools.

Not true. Although public education could definitely be improved and is a significant issue within the inner city, Northern St. Johns County's public schools are no better academically than those in Southern Duval County and Duval has some of the best high schools in the state.
« Last Edit: February 02, 2019, 07:56:53 PM by thelakelander »
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