Author Topic: Curry's Plan for the Landing Revealed  (Read 13360 times)

Tacachale

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Re: Curry's Plan for the Landing Revealed
« Reply #165 on: July 05, 2018, 10:52:21 AM »
Quote

The Jacksonville Landing could be torn down, but other cities are renovating festival marketplaces

By David Bauerlein

Posted Jul 3, 2018 at 8:22 PM
Updated Jul 4, 2018 at 2:07 PM
     
Fireworks will explode this Fourth of July over The Jacksonville Landing in downtown.

They also will burst over The Waterside District in Norfolk, Va.

While the flash and boom will be the same up high in the sky, those who turn out for the shows will find a big contrast at ground level at the two venues, which were built in the 1980s when cities across the country embraced the “festival marketplace” concept to give suburbanites a reason to go downtown.

The Waterside District recently underwent a $40 million renovation of the building that opened on the Elizabeth River in 1983. The Jacksonville Landing has not undergone a major renovation since it opened in 1987 on the St. Johns River. City leaders have come out in favor of tearing down the Landing to make way for something entirely different.

When the Downtown Investment Authority conducted public workshops in 2015 to solicit ideas for the site’s future, some people voiced support for keeping it because it is one of the city’s most well-known buildings, provided it can get more people going to it. But there has been no appetite from the city or the Landing’s owner to sink the kind of investment into it that had marked renovations elsewhere.

A Look Back: The Jacksonville Landing through the years
Waterside in Norfolk and the Landing were built during the period when the Rouse Company was at the forefront of shaping downtown developments with the festival marketplaces that combined shopping with lots of entertainment intended to attract suburbanites back to the urban core.

If the wrecking ball does level the Landing, it wouldn’t be the first demolition of a festival marketplace. The city of Richmond’s 6th Street Marketplace opened in 1985, but by 2003, the city moved to demolish the building, returning the street to use by pedestrians and vehicles.

In other cities, the concept has proven to have staying power, such as Waterside in Norfolk and Bayside Marketplace in Miami, which is in the midst of a $30 million renovation. Harborplace in Baltimore, often cited as a model for The Jacksonville Landing, has been undergoing renovation as well.

...


From the Florida Times-Union.

http://www.jacksonville.com/news/20180703/jacksonville-landing-could-be-torn-down-but-other-cities-are-renovating-festival-marketplaces
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thelakelander

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Re: Curry's Plan for the Landing Revealed
« Reply #166 on: July 05, 2018, 12:02:10 PM »
Waterside, Harborplace and Bayside are three great examples of reuse of similar structures. All have the same design issues we claim have killed the Landing. Unlike the Landing, they continue to be retrofitted with evolving tenant mixes that align with current market trends. They all also have dedicated parking garages! On the other hand, Richmond did demolish their structure. Needless to say, the places that kept their buildings attract a hell of a lot more people to those locations than Richmond does to 6th Street.
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Wacca Pilatka

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Re: Curry's Plan for the Landing Revealed
« Reply #167 on: July 05, 2018, 01:24:25 PM »
6th Street's a bit of a different situation because it was a hybrid of a mall and a festival marketplace, and in the middle of the core city rather than on waterfront property.  Richmond had two large department stores downtown, Thalhimers and Miller & Rhoads.  6th Street was built to connect these stores and create a mall between them to compete with the suburban malls; and also to connect to a performing arts center to the south and convention center, hotel, and arena to the north.  To that end, it had a long, narrow footprint extending across multiple blocks and separate buildings; to go from one end to the other, you had to leave one structure and cross the street to a separate structure, and ultimately crossed Broad Street via footbridge to the department stores in a symbolic linking of historically segregated neighborhoods.  It replaced several blocks of 6th Street downtown.

It ended up satisfying no one because although it was intended to serve as a competitor to suburban malls and revive the grande dame downtown stores, the store bays in its footprint were not deep enough to attract conventional mall retailers - they were the size of store spaces at the festival marketplaces.  The festival marketplace concept didn't work because that part of Richmond still had a reputation (not really deserved, IMHO) in the 80s and 90s as dangerous, and the convention business wasn't brisk from what I understand, with relative desolation around the center and its Marriott at the time.  (Richmond also repurposed its Main Street train station at the time into a second shopping center - outlet oriented as I recall, but like a festival marketplace thematically since it was in a historic urban building.  Not sure if the two malls cannibalized each other.  The station is now a functioning train station again.)

The department stores both closed in the early 90s, after their acquisition by national chains.  That pretty much killed the Marketplace, though it hung on until 2002 or 2003 or so.  I visited there right before it closed.  It was a pleasant building, similar in look to Waterside and the Landing (brickwork, decorative green metal roof) and nicely lit with natural light, and the bridge over Broad was beautiful in intent as well as design.  But the whole plan was structurally flawed.

Richmond has made a tremendous comeback, and its urban core has become very successful and attractive to new residents with its walkability, historic preservation, and outdoor recreation opportunities.  The area around the coliseum and convention center, once rather desolate, has filled in with a walkable tech park area and visitor center.  Virginia Commonwealth University's expansion has led to revitalization on Broad Street.  The Thalhimers building was repurposed as a performing arts center expansion, Miller & Rhoads as a hotel, and tearing down the structure seemingly made sense in enhancing walkability through the neighborhood.

All of that being said - wholeheartedly agree on adaptive reuse of the Landing, not tearing it down.
« Last Edit: July 05, 2018, 01:35:28 PM by Wacca Pilatka »
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Charles Hunter

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Re: Curry's Plan for the Landing Revealed
« Reply #169 on: July 05, 2018, 04:19:26 PM »
Any plans for the Landing must include resilience for more frequent flooding, the ability to absorb inundations without extensive closures and reconstruction.  Wonder if the redecorated Hooters includes this?

pierre

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Re: Curry's Plan for the Landing Revealed
« Reply #170 on: July 06, 2018, 08:40:53 AM »
Just tear down the entire Landing except for the Hooters. Just a giant park with a centerpiece Hooters.

thelakelander

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Re: Curry's Plan for the Landing Revealed
« Reply #171 on: July 06, 2018, 09:25:40 AM »
Any plans for the Landing must include resilience for more frequent flooding, the ability to absorb inundations without extensive closures and reconstruction.  Wonder if the redecorated Hooters includes this?
From what I understand, the Landing building itself did not flood during Irma. It was the lower lying outdoor areas that were underwater.
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