Author Topic: Skyway Expansion: Forgotten Urban Core Neighborhoods  (Read 3537 times)

ProjectMaximus

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Re: Skyway Expansion: Forgotten Urban Core Neighborhoods
« Reply #15 on: May 02, 2018, 09:47:58 AM »
2. Springfield and Brooklyn are probably the main areas where gentrification is taking place in Jacksonville. I've heard some stories from residents who were there long before the bobos. Gentrification is happening.

3. Ideally Jax is so sprawly that the urban core should be able to accommodate bobos and its existing residential population base.

Lol I had never heard this term before. Had to check urban dictionary and learned something new today  ;D

Tacachale

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Re: Skyway Expansion: Forgotten Urban Core Neighborhoods
« Reply #16 on: May 02, 2018, 10:21:47 AM »
2. Springfield and Brooklyn are probably the main areas where gentrification is taking place in Jacksonville. I've heard some stories from residents who were there long before the bobos. Gentrification is happening.

3. Ideally Jax is so sprawly that the urban core should be able to accommodate bobos and its existing residential population base.

Lol I had never heard this term before. Had to check urban dictionary and learned something new today  ;D

Happy to say that one was my contribution to the article. It should get wider play around here, I imagine it describes a fair number of Metro Jaxsons. ;D
Do you believe that when the blue jay or another bird sings and the body is trembling, that is a signal that people are coming or something important is about to happen?

sanmarcomatt

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Re: Skyway Expansion: Forgotten Urban Core Neighborhoods
« Reply #17 on: May 02, 2018, 11:22:13 AM »
2. Springfield and Brooklyn are probably the main areas where gentrification is taking place in Jacksonville. I've heard some stories from residents who were there long before the bobos. Gentrification is happening.

3. Ideally Jax is so sprawly that the urban core should be able to accommodate bobos and its existing residential population base.

Lol I had never heard this term before. Had to check urban dictionary and learned something new today  ;D

Happy to say that one was my contribution to the article. It should get wider play around here, I imagine it describes a fair number of Metro Jaxsons. ;D

I had no idea either so I googled it.  This was my result so someone may need to explain the gentrification angle to me:


Urban Dictionary: bobo
https://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=bobo

A Korean dude who muds like a maniac and farts uncontrollably.

Tacachale

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Re: Skyway Expansion: Forgotten Urban Core Neighborhoods
« Reply #18 on: May 02, 2018, 11:50:00 AM »
2. Springfield and Brooklyn are probably the main areas where gentrification is taking place in Jacksonville. I've heard some stories from residents who were there long before the bobos. Gentrification is happening.

3. Ideally Jax is so sprawly that the urban core should be able to accommodate bobos and its existing residential population base.

Lol I had never heard this term before. Had to check urban dictionary and learned something new today  ;D

Happy to say that one was my contribution to the article. It should get wider play around here, I imagine it describes a fair number of Metro Jaxsons. ;D

I had no idea either so I googled it.  This was my result so someone may need to explain the gentrification angle to me:


Urban Dictionary: bobo
https://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=bobo

A Korean dude who muds like a maniac and farts uncontrollably.

LOL. Try this one:

http://www.dictionary.com/browse/bobo

It's from "Bourgeois Bohemian".
Do you believe that when the blue jay or another bird sings and the body is trembling, that is a signal that people are coming or something important is about to happen?

ProjectMaximus

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Re: Skyway Expansion: Forgotten Urban Core Neighborhoods
« Reply #19 on: May 02, 2018, 04:19:45 PM »
I had no idea either so I googled it.  This was my result so someone may need to explain the gentrification angle to me:


Urban Dictionary: bobo
https://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=bobo

A Korean dude who muds like a maniac and farts uncontrollably.

LMAO. Somehow that is the top definition....but I had to scroll down to #7 before finding the relatable definition. I suppose farting Korean dudes should be allowed in the mix as well.

Bill Hoff

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Re: Skyway Expansion: Forgotten Urban Core Neighborhoods
« Reply #20 on: May 03, 2018, 03:00:08 AM »
Regarding gentrification & Springfield (hijacking a bit):

There are literally hundreds of dedicated low-income housing units in and directly adjacent to SPR, not to mention walking distance from all the shelters, so it's never going to be as gentrified as Riverside, Murray Hill, Brooklyn or any other similiar neighborhood - they don't have either of those features.

Also, gentrification obviously has positive merits. For one, the last MetroEdge study completed a couple years ago showed very clearly that to obtain & sustain the type of quality services and businesses that the community wants and does not have (even pretty basic stuff), more people with disposable income living within X distance is required.

thelakelander

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Re: Skyway Expansion: Forgotten Urban Core Neighborhoods
« Reply #21 on: May 03, 2018, 05:39:52 AM »
"Community" can be defined in several different ways. Anyway, in general, there's nothing wrong with more people with a disposable income living within a neighborhood. The problem or lack of balance arrives when there's a perspective that this can only be achieved through displacement of those without it. None of Jax's neighborhoods, Springfield included, are dense enough where this should be the only want to increase the density of residents with a disposable income. I don't have the numbers in front of me, but I suspect Springfield is two or three times less dense than it was in its heyday. That's why most of 8th and Main, two corridors once built to support a much higher all around density, will take years to enjoy a full rebirth. However, they also represent opportunities for increased infill and density at multiple income levels as well. Same would have went for Sugar Hill, Brooklyn and LaVilla but obviously they aren't historic districts, leading not only to displacement but significant loss of building stock from failed urban renewal schemes as well.

With that in mind, in a city that tends to see preservation as a stumbling block, long time residents living in areas where bobos (I like that term) are starting to find value in, should be on the lookout at possibly being displaced (or at least making sure balance is maintained). This is one of the reasons I have no problem with the DIA adding affordable housing in LaVilla.
« Last Edit: May 03, 2018, 05:42:13 AM by thelakelander »
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