Author Topic: Brightline Train Deaths  (Read 8877 times)

FloridaBoy

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Brightline Train Deaths
« on: February 26, 2018, 11:05:33 AM »
Not sure why this isn't being discussed more but there have been 16 deaths by Florida East Coast trains in the last year.  There have been 20 train deaths by Florida East Coast trains since 2016.  Three of these deaths have been by the new Brightline train that have only been operation for a few months and a woman was killed by a Brightline train on the inaugural run.

Once the Brightline train is running all the way to Orlando expect those numbers to jump.  Folks are outraged over mass shootings at schools.  Why isn't there outrage when a private company is running over people with high speed trains?

https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nation-now/2018/01/16/florida-railway-corridor-deaths/1038618001/

Tacachale

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Re: Brightline Train Deaths
« Reply #1 on: February 26, 2018, 11:08:32 AM »
Do you believe that when the blue jay or another bird sings and the body is trembling, that is a signal that people are coming or something important is about to happen?

Adam White

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Re: Brightline Train Deaths
« Reply #2 on: February 26, 2018, 11:10:16 AM »
Folks are outraged over mass shootings at schools.  Why isn't there outrage when a private company is running over people with high speed trains?

https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nation-now/2018/01/16/florida-railway-corridor-deaths/1038618001/

To answer your question, it's probably because in the case of school shootings, the victims are blameless. In the case of the Brightline deaths, the victims are likely at fault.

That's not to say the TOC or railway or whatever they call it doesn't share some responsibility. I don't really know the answer to that. But people (rightly) get more outraged by mass murder than they do accidents.
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FloridaBoy

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Re: Brightline Train Deaths
« Reply #3 on: February 26, 2018, 11:22:29 AM »
So a train going through a commercial and residential section of town, travelling at 110 MPH, makes sense?  Streets right next to these tracks have speed limits of 35 MPH in many cases.  This isn't rural pasture land we are talking about.  These trains are going through downtowns, the pedestrian hearts of these cities.  Imagine a 110 MPH train going through Riverside or downtown Jacksonville...

KenFSU

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Re: Brightline Train Deaths
« Reply #4 on: February 26, 2018, 11:23:55 AM »
Innocent children gunned down in a classroom.

Irresponsible, impatient adults hit by trains after driving or biking around safety gates with gigantic flashing signs begging them to stop.

Same difference.

Adam White

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Re: Brightline Train Deaths
« Reply #5 on: February 26, 2018, 11:36:12 AM »
So a train going through a commercial and residential section of town, travelling at 110 MPH, makes sense?  Streets right next to these tracks have speed limits of 35 MPH in many cases.  This isn't rural pasture land we are talking about.  These trains are going through downtowns, the pedestrian hearts of these cities.  Imagine a 110 MPH train going through Riverside or downtown Jacksonville...

I don't have to imagine it - I've seen it with my own eyes.

Edit: and by that, I mean I've seen a high speed train travel through congested area. Obvs not DT Jax or Riverside.
« Last Edit: February 26, 2018, 11:39:25 AM by Adam White »
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FloridaBoy

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Re: Brightline Train Deaths
« Reply #6 on: February 26, 2018, 11:36:26 AM »
Quote
Irresponsible, impatient adults hit by trains after driving or biking around safety gates with gigantic flashing signs begging them to stop.

Who is more impatient?  The train travelling 110 MPH or the hapless pedestrian crossing a neighborhood street to get to work?

Adam White

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Re: Brightline Train Deaths
« Reply #7 on: February 26, 2018, 11:41:44 AM »
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Irresponsible, impatient adults hit by trains after driving or biking around safety gates with gigantic flashing signs begging them to stop.

Who is more impatient?  The train travelling 110 MPH or the hapless pedestrian crossing a neighborhood street to get to work?

Trains are inanimate objects - they can't be 'impatient'.
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thelakelander

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Re: Brightline Train Deaths
« Reply #8 on: February 26, 2018, 11:45:09 AM »
So a train going through a commercial and residential section of town, travelling at 110 MPH, makes sense?  Streets right next to these tracks have speed limits of 35 MPH in many cases.  This isn't rural pasture land we are talking about.  These trains are going through downtowns, the pedestrian hearts of these cities.  Imagine a 110 MPH train going through Riverside or downtown Jacksonville...
Brightline trains don't travel anywhere close to 110 mph in South Florida. Heck, I doubt they even get up to 80 mph. I see the point you're trying to make but your stats paint a false narrative. The ultimate answer is to not attempt to beat trains across the tracks. Unfortunately, you can't dummy proof everything in life.
« Last Edit: February 26, 2018, 11:46:58 AM by thelakelander »
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BridgeTroll

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Re: Brightline Train Deaths
« Reply #9 on: February 26, 2018, 12:04:27 PM »
Quote
Irresponsible, impatient adults hit by trains after driving or biking around safety gates with gigantic flashing signs begging them to stop.

Who is more impatient?  The train travelling 110 MPH or the hapless pedestrian crossing a neighborhood street to get to work?

From your own article...

Quote
On Wednesday, Linda Short, 73, of Berea, Ohio, was killed at 7:40 p.m. ET after driving her car onto the Florida East Coast tracks in Delray Beach and into the path of an oncoming freight train, according to Delray Beach police.

Two days later, Melissa Lavell, 32, was killed after apparently trying to beat an oncoming Brightline passenger train in Boynton Beach, according to police.

"After speaking with witnesses, it appears that Lavell was crossing the tracks after the guard rails were in the down position in an attempt to make it across before the train approached," police said in a statement posted online.
In a boat at sea one of the men began to bore a hole in the bottom of the boat. On being remonstrating with, he answered, "I am only boring under my own seat." "Yes," said his companions, "but when the sea rushes in we shall all be drowned with you."

RiversideRambler

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Re: Brightline Train Deaths
« Reply #10 on: February 26, 2018, 12:10:39 PM »
I was reading an article about the Brightline deaths and one thing they suggested was people either don't realize how fast the Brightline trains are going (maybe not 110 mph but still faster than most trains) and/or they can't judge how much time they actually have to cross the tracks (spoiler alert: the answer is less than they thought).

FloridaBoy

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Re: Brightline Train Deaths
« Reply #11 on: February 26, 2018, 12:22:31 PM »
Quote
Brightline trains don't travel anywhere close to 110 mph in South Florida. Heck, I doubt they even get up to 80 mph. I see the point you're trying to make but your stats paint a false narrative. The ultimate answer is to not attempt to beat trains across the tracks. Unfortunately, you can't dummy proof everything in life.

They go 79 MPH in South Florida.  The plan is to go 110 MPH once the train leaves West Palm to Cocoa and then 125 MPH from Cocoa to Orlando.

At some point there's going to be a tractor trailer stuck on the tracks.  At 79 MPH a train can not stop quickly, let alone one going at 110 MPH or 125 MPH.  At that point everyone riding the train is at risk of injury or death.  Do we blame the passengers for riding the train?
« Last Edit: February 26, 2018, 12:43:04 PM by FloridaBoy »

thelakelander

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Re: Brightline Train Deaths
« Reply #12 on: February 26, 2018, 12:44:06 PM »
Tri-Rail and Amtrak also travel up to 79 mph in South Florida and have been doing so for decades. I'm not sure what you want Brightline and FEC to do. You squeeze between the gates to get around a train and get hit, you're likely to die regardless of it traveling at 60 or 79 miles per hour. At some point, personal responsibility needs to play a role.
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thelakelander

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Re: Brightline Train Deaths
« Reply #13 on: February 26, 2018, 12:48:04 PM »
By the way, the truck stuck on tracks accident has happened before. An Amtrak train hit a gasoline tanker in South Florida back in the early 1990s.
https://www.washingtonpost.com/archive/politics/1993/03/18/6-are-killed-when-train-gasoline-tanker-truck-crash-at-crossing/359ebbbd-d971-4408-9e68-bce291bf2fdf/
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Josh

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Re: Brightline Train Deaths
« Reply #14 on: February 26, 2018, 12:49:44 PM »
Quote
Brightline trains don't travel anywhere close to 110 mph in South Florida. Heck, I doubt they even get up to 80 mph. I see the point you're trying to make but your stats paint a false narrative. The ultimate answer is to not attempt to beat trains across the tracks. Unfortunately, you can't dummy proof everything in life.

They go 79 MPH in South Florida.  The plan is to go 110 MPH once the train leaves West Palm to Cocoa and then 125 MPH from Cocoa to Orlando.

At some point there's going to be a tractor trailer stuck on the tracks.  At 79 MPH a train can not stop quickly, let alone one going at 110 MPH or 125 MPH.  At that point everyone riding the train is at risk of injury or death.  Do we blame the passengers for riding the train?

These small passenger trains still out-brake loaded freight trains by orders of magnitude.