Poll

Should Jacksonville sell (privatize) JEA?

Yes
4 (10.3%)
No
35 (89.7%)

Total Members Voted: 39

Voting closed: February 27, 2018, 12:55:01 PM

Author Topic: Should Jacksonville sell (privatize) JEA?  (Read 24236 times)

BridgeTroll

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Re: Should Jacksonville sell (privatize) JEA?
« Reply #30 on: February 13, 2018, 12:38:22 PM »
Quote
as the tax money that would be generated from a private JEA would be far less than the contribution JEA pays to the city right now.

This is from the draft report...

Quote
Property Taxes vs. City Contribution

As a municipal utility, JEA does not pay property taxes on its land and assets; as an alternative JEA
pays an annual contribution in lieu of taxes. Should a private entity take the place of JEA, the taxable
assessed value of property in Duval County could increase by approximately 10% (the addition of
~$5bn net capital assets on the City’s ~$50bn taxable base). Based on current millage rates, this
increase in assessed value will equate to approximately $101 million of additional property taxes
receipts, of which $63.5 million would go the City of Jacksonville General Fund. Most of the
remainder would go toward funding public schools.

JEA is currently contributing ~$120 million a year to the general fund.

Correct.

Can this amount change...ie increase?

It can change. One of Mayor Brown's pension ideas was to lower the annual contribution in exchange for a one-time lump sum payment to pay down the pension. It was a bad idea, as the city would have been out a lot of money in the long run. I don't know why JEA would go along with an increase unless they got some concession out of it, which may or may not be a good deal for the city.

Is it possible this "Value report" could be used to squeeze more money out of JEA?  Perhaps we are undervaluing JEA and they are under paying...
In a boat at sea one of the men began to bore a hole in the bottom of the boat. On being remonstrating with, he answered, "I am only boring under my own seat." "Yes," said his companions, "but when the sea rushes in we shall all be drowned with you."

BridgeTroll

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Re: Should Jacksonville sell (privatize) JEA?
« Reply #31 on: February 13, 2018, 12:55:51 PM »
I re-opened the poll as there seems to be some additional interest...
In a boat at sea one of the men began to bore a hole in the bottom of the boat. On being remonstrating with, he answered, "I am only boring under my own seat." "Yes," said his companions, "but when the sea rushes in we shall all be drowned with you."

Tacachale

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Re: Should Jacksonville sell (privatize) JEA?
« Reply #32 on: February 13, 2018, 01:03:32 PM »
Quote
as the tax money that would be generated from a private JEA would be far less than the contribution JEA pays to the city right now.

This is from the draft report...

Quote
Property Taxes vs. City Contribution

As a municipal utility, JEA does not pay property taxes on its land and assets; as an alternative JEA
pays an annual contribution in lieu of taxes. Should a private entity take the place of JEA, the taxable
assessed value of property in Duval County could increase by approximately 10% (the addition of
~$5bn net capital assets on the City’s ~$50bn taxable base). Based on current millage rates, this
increase in assessed value will equate to approximately $101 million of additional property taxes
receipts, of which $63.5 million would go the City of Jacksonville General Fund. Most of the
remainder would go toward funding public schools.

JEA is currently contributing ~$120 million a year to the general fund.

Correct.

Can this amount change...ie increase?

It can change. One of Mayor Brown's pension ideas was to lower the annual contribution in exchange for a one-time lump sum payment to pay down the pension. It was a bad idea, as the city would have been out a lot of money in the long run. I don't know why JEA would go along with an increase unless they got some concession out of it, which may or may not be a good deal for the city.

Is it possible this "Value report" could be used to squeeze more money out of JEA?  Perhaps we are undervaluing JEA and they are under paying...

It's possible that could happen.
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KenFSU

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Re: Should Jacksonville sell (privatize) JEA?
« Reply #33 on: February 13, 2018, 01:22:54 PM »
Quote
as the tax money that would be generated from a private JEA would be far less than the contribution JEA pays to the city right now.

This is from the draft report...

Quote
Property Taxes vs. City Contribution

As a municipal utility, JEA does not pay property taxes on its land and assets; as an alternative JEA
pays an annual contribution in lieu of taxes. Should a private entity take the place of JEA, the taxable
assessed value of property in Duval County could increase by approximately 10% (the addition of
~$5bn net capital assets on the City’s ~$50bn taxable base). Based on current millage rates, this
increase in assessed value will equate to approximately $101 million of additional property taxes
receipts, of which $63.5 million would go the City of Jacksonville General Fund. Most of the
remainder would go toward funding public schools.

JEA is currently contributing ~$120 million a year to the general fund.

Correct.

Can this amount change...ie increase?

It can change. One of Mayor Brown's pension ideas was to lower the annual contribution in exchange for a one-time lump sum payment to pay down the pension. It was a bad idea, as the city would have been out a lot of money in the long run. I don't know why JEA would go along with an increase unless they got some concession out of it, which may or may not be a good deal for the city.

I believe there was also an attempt to get JEA to pay an additional $40 million per year to help pay down the pension debt, which they rejected and deemed not possible due to their existing debt service.

BridgeTroll

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Re: Should Jacksonville sell (privatize) JEA?
« Reply #34 on: February 13, 2018, 01:36:37 PM »
Quote
as the tax money that would be generated from a private JEA would be far less than the contribution JEA pays to the city right now.

This is from the draft report...

Quote
Property Taxes vs. City Contribution

As a municipal utility, JEA does not pay property taxes on its land and assets; as an alternative JEA
pays an annual contribution in lieu of taxes. Should a private entity take the place of JEA, the taxable
assessed value of property in Duval County could increase by approximately 10% (the addition of
~$5bn net capital assets on the City’s ~$50bn taxable base). Based on current millage rates, this
increase in assessed value will equate to approximately $101 million of additional property taxes
receipts, of which $63.5 million would go the City of Jacksonville General Fund. Most of the
remainder would go toward funding public schools.

JEA is currently contributing ~$120 million a year to the general fund.

Correct.

Can this amount change...ie increase?

It can change. One of Mayor Brown's pension ideas was to lower the annual contribution in exchange for a one-time lump sum payment to pay down the pension. It was a bad idea, as the city would have been out a lot of money in the long run. I don't know why JEA would go along with an increase unless they got some concession out of it, which may or may not be a good deal for the city.

I believe there was also an attempt to get JEA to pay an additional $40 million per year to help pay down the pension debt, which they rejected and deemed not possible due to their existing debt service.

Thats right... just throwing out a hypothetical... The pension debt is huge... if JEA were sold and that debt paid off it seems possible that the $140 mil JEA sends us yearly might seem like a drop in the bucket...  All tax revenue could be used for things taxes are supposed to be used for and not simply tranfered out to pay the debt...
In a boat at sea one of the men began to bore a hole in the bottom of the boat. On being remonstrating with, he answered, "I am only boring under my own seat." "Yes," said his companions, "but when the sea rushes in we shall all be drowned with you."

Elwood

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Re: Should Jacksonville sell (privatize) JEA?
« Reply #35 on: February 13, 2018, 03:23:36 PM »
While true that remaining funds would go towards public schools, the state dictates where that money goes. Nothing guarantees how much, if any, Duval county would receive.


BridgeTroll

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Re: Should Jacksonville sell (privatize) JEA?
« Reply #37 on: February 14, 2018, 06:54:24 AM »
Pretty good Op ed from the Times Union back in December...

http://www.jacksonville.com/opinion/editorials/2017-12-01/sunday-editorial-selling-jea-has-never-made-sense-past-and-it-may-not

Quote
By Times-Union editorial board
Posted Dec 1, 2017 at 6:17 PM     
Selling JEA is an idea that comes up with every new set of city officials. But it’s never as simple as it first appears.

The utility has long been considered the golden goose because its revenues are so easily tapped for city government. But the politics implied by that fact have sometimes led to poor results for the customers.  For instance, a reluctance to raise rates in the early 2000s led JEA to build up large amounts of debt.  And an over-reliance on one source of fuel eventually led to huge increases in electric rates. 
In both cases, the political pressures placed on the ostensibly independent utility were huge.  Now JEA board member Tom Petway has suggested that JEA explore the possibility of privatization. 

It’s an intriguing thought.

Would an investor-owned electric utility serve area customers better? Would the city receive a windfall of cash that could be used for all kinds of local needs?  There is no harm in such an analysis, but something new will have to be found to make the finances work.  Selling to a huge utility like Florida Power &Light certainly would give Jacksonville customers benefits of its economies of scale as well as a diversified power portfolio that includes nuclear power and a growing amount of solar power.  But selling JEA has been analyzed twice in recent years by the City Council Auditor’s Office with reports issued in 2007 and updated in 2012.  In both cases, the math simply didn’t add up for city government.  In the 2012 analysis, the auditor estimated an annual revenue stream from a sale of $24 million and annual ad valorem taxes of $62 million.  That total of $86 million would be offset by the loss of $102 million of the JEA’s contributions to the city at that time.  That’s a $16 million annual shortfall.  So there’s no windfall for city government there.  Those numbers certainly could be updated, but the principles would remain. There would have to be some additional revenue source to make up the difference.  And there are many other issues to factor into a sale.

THE SCHOOLS WOULD BE A BIG WINNER

The biggest winner in the sale of the JEA would be the Duval County Public Schools. The school system currently receives no contributions in lieu of taxes from JEA, which is typical for municipal utilities.  As the Times-Union Editorial Board has long stated, the school system has been shortchanged for generations under this arrangement.  Under the 2012 scenario, the school system could receive as much as $46.8 million in annual tax revenues from an investor-owned utility.  You could argue that Jacksonville generally would be better off with this massive infusion of revenue to the public schools. Still, the city government would have to find revenue to make up the annual shortfall from a sale.

LOSS OF JOBS

A major downside to a sale that is not often mentioned is the presumed loss of about 750 high-paying JEA jobs with annual salaries and benefits totaling more than $70 million.  Again, those were the estimated numbers in 2012.  But the big picture remains the same.  Would a buyer agree to grandfather these jobs in Duval County? And even under a grandfathered scenario, it would seem that some jobs would be lost.

VALUE OF COAL PLANTS

JEA and its partner FP&L are shutting down a jointly owned coal plant. Coal plants simply are not economical these days with the low fuel and operating costs of natural gas power plants. So what are JEA’s coal plants worth? Who wants a white elephant?  And what’s the assurance that a buyer would even maintain power plants in Duval County? What’s to stop an investor-owned utility from building a plant in Baker County, for example?  There goes local property tax revenues.

LOCAL CONTROL

Oversight of investor-owned utilities is conducted by the Florida Public Service Commission. Local influence over the electric utility would be diluted. No longer could a mayor force the resignations of JEA board members — because there wouldn’t be a JEA.  “It is doubtful that an investor-owned utility based outside of Jacksonville would partner as closely with the city as JEA,” the auditor’s report stated.

ECONOMIES OF SCALE

Florida Power &Light replaced 5 million of its electric meters with smart meters according to its own design. Those meters allow FP&L to know instantly which homes have lost power. The utility also is a major builder and user of solar energy.  Though JEA is a large municipal utility with its own solar farm, it doesn’t compare to FP&L’s size.

ELECTRIC RATES

In recent years, FP&L’s rates have been lower than JEA’s — but the gap has been closing thanks to recent rate increases from FP&L.  In JEA’s most recent residential rate comparison, JEA customers pay $111.76 and FP&L customers pay $103.07 for 1,000 kilowatt hours.

WHAT ABOUT WATER AND SEWER?

The Jacksonville Electric Authority changed its name to JEA years ago because it was no longer just an electric utility. It took over the city’s water and sewer utility, investing billions in upgrades.  Would a water-sewer system be included in a sale?  It might revert back to the city.  In short, there is no harm in conducting another deep dive into a possible sale of JEA. Perhaps there is something that the previous council auditor analyses missed.
In a boat at sea one of the men began to bore a hole in the bottom of the boat. On being remonstrating with, he answered, "I am only boring under my own seat." "Yes," said his companions, "but when the sea rushes in we shall all be drowned with you."

BridgeTroll

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Re: Should Jacksonville sell (privatize) JEA?
« Reply #38 on: February 15, 2018, 06:44:39 AM »
Things are getting good...lol

https://www.news4jax.com/news/local/jacksonville/no-consensus-in-city-council-over-jea-sales_

Quote
City Council president snubs mayor at meeting to discuss JEA sale
Mayor Lenny Curry has denied council members' claims he is pushing sale

By Jim Piggott - Reporter, Corley Peel - Reporter, Kent Justice - Anchor/reporter
Posted: 3:29 PM, February 14, 2018
Updated: 9:47 PM, February 14, 2018

JACKSONVILLE, Fla. - At Wednesday's special Jacksonville City Council meeting, which Mayor Lenny Curry called when Council President Anna Lopez Brosche wouldn't, there were more fireworks in a growing rift between the branches of city government over the potential sale of JEA.

During introductions, Lopez Brosche refused to acknowledge Curry. She was among several council members who believe that the mayor's office is behind effort to sell the city-owned utility -- a charge Curry vehemently denies.

The report suggests that economic conditions now are good for a sale and that there would be a substantial profit for the city. Council members were told the sale could bring the city between $3 billion and $6 billion, but JEA's existing debt would need to be paid off out of the proceeds.

The report did not address what effect it would have on JEA's customers.

When Lopez Brosche did not recognize the mayor, he turned, gave a thumbs-up to the people in the room and sat back down.

"Here’s what I would have said," Curry told News4Jax outside the meeting. "This needs to be done in a transparent way. This is information only. There would be no action taken here today, and that the lens that I would view all of this through would be: Is this good for ratepayers and taxpayers, and is this good for JEA employees?"

The majority of council members told News4Jax before the meeting they do not have enough information to say whether or not they would support privatizing the city-owned utility. Most left City Hall saying they still needed to know more before making up their mind.

Some City Council members are also asking questions to city lawyers about the terms of a potential sale. They want to know if portions can be sold over time. They also want to know the implications of holding a straw vote during the next election to learn where the public stands on the issue.

Mayor's chief of staff denied
In a somewhat related note, City Council on Wednesday canceled access to chambers by Curry's chief of staff, Brian Hughes. This comes after a council secretary filed a formal complaint that he accosted her in an angry fashion and caused a "hostile work environment."

News4Jax learned Hughes' badge was deactivated for access at the order of Lopez Brosche. He still has full access to the mayor's office, just not the council chamber and offices and must be escorted if he visits.

Opposition launches robo calls, website
The issue has become a lightning rod at City Hall. Council members are receiving calls and email from people saying someone is calling them, blasting JEA and then transferring that call to City Council.

One person who emailed City Council wrote: "I am alarmed because instead of giving citizens the chance to get all the facts to make an informed decision, someone believes it is acceptable strategy to make broad unsubstantiated derogatory statements like 'JEA is mismanaged.'"

Councilman John Crescimbeni has been outspoken about the JEA proposal, saying the public outcry is premature.

"I personally, as a council member, resent that. If we’re going to have this conversation and we are not in any hurry, why would somebody be going to the trouble and pushing those types of calls to council members at the very outset of this process?" Crescimbeni said.

So far, News4Jax has not learned which group is behind the calls opposing the sale. We were told the callers do not identify themselves.

A website, JEAisOURS.com, sponsored by the Florida Committee for Infrastructure Investment, was launched that is laying out concerns about higher electric rates, lost jobs and other issues. That site was set up by a political committee with Democratic ties.

News4Jax crews are at the 3 p.m. meeting in City Council chambers. This article will be updated as the meeting progresses.

How the 19 City Council members feel about selling the JEA.
 District    Council member    Response   
1                    Joyce Morgan   Needs more info
2                    Al Ferraro   Not available
3                    Aaron Bowman   Not available
4                    Scott Wilson   Needs more info
5                    Lori Boyer   Needs more info
6                    Matt Schellenberg    Needs more info
7                    Reggie Gaffney   Not available
8                    Katrina Brown   Would vote no
9                    Garrett Dennis   Would vote no
10                    Reginald Brown   Would vote no
11                    Danny Becton   Needs more info
12                    Doyle Carter   Not available
13                    Bill Gulliford   Needs more info
14                    Jim Love   Needs more info
At Large 1        Anna Lopez Brosche      Needs more info
At Large 2          John Crescimbeni   Needs more info
At Large 3          Tommy Hazouri   Needs more info
At Large 4          Greg Anderson   Not available
At Large 5           Samuel Newby   Needs more info
 
In a boat at sea one of the men began to bore a hole in the bottom of the boat. On being remonstrating with, he answered, "I am only boring under my own seat." "Yes," said his companions, "but when the sea rushes in we shall all be drowned with you."

BridgeTroll

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Re: Should Jacksonville sell (privatize) JEA?
« Reply #39 on: February 15, 2018, 06:48:22 AM »
http://www.jacksonville.com/news/20180214/meeting-about-jea-turns-into-bitter-feud

Quote
A meeting about JEA turns into a bitter feud

By David Bauerlein
@DavidBauerlein
By Nate Monroe
@NateMonroeTU
Posted Feb 14, 2018 at 6:18 PM
Updated Feb 14, 2018 at 9:54 PM

Amid meeting over how much money City Hall could get by selling Jacksonville’s electric and water utility to a private buyer, a feud erupted into the open between the city’s top two officials.

In a public meeting Wednesday where a utility expert revealed that privatizing JEA could net City Hall between $3 billion and $6.4 billion, the cold war unfolding before the at-capacity crowd between Mayor Lenny Curry and City Council President Anna Brosche left people gobsmacked.

The quietly unfolding feud — the intensity of which has not been seen in years — marked a new nadir between the leaders of the city’s executive and legislative branches, and it comes as officials are exploring the privatization of JEA — an effort the expert told city officials Wednesday requires unity from within the local government.

“Things have gotten too personal,” a former City Hall official remarked.

The genesis of the Wednesday meeting was itself the result of a rift between Brosche and Curry.

Brosche rebuffed a request from JEA’s chief executive officer to schedule a formal council meeting to discuss the utility’s dollar value, in the process criticizing the pace of privatization talks and the mayor’s handling of it.

So the mayor, infuriated by Brosche’s criticism, called the meeting Wednesday himself.

Things quickly went south.

First, Brosche shut down JEA board Chairman Alan Howard as he tried to introduce Curry. She refused to recognize the mayor and let him speak.

“I wish it were different, but I don’t have an obligation to respect someone who doesn’t respect me,” Brosche said after the meeting.

Then, as the meeting went on, Curry tweeted from his seat just a few feet away from Brosche, “It is unfortunate the Council President refused to call a public meeting to distribute a public document in a transparent manner. I called this meeting so all could get this document at the same time. I called this meeting for information purposes. No action to be taken.”

Finally, after a utility-finance expert finished presenting his findings to the City Council, and Brosche took the microphone to ask an initial round of questions, Curry and his chief of staff stood up, walked out, and held a gaggle for reporters out in the City Hall atrium.

“I was in there to see the document,” Curry said, adding that he called the meeting Wednesday so the report could be reviewed in a transparent way. He also rejected suggestions recently aired by some City Council members that he is pushing for the sale of JEA.

During the meeting, another revelation: Brosche ordered Brian Hughes, Curry’s chief of staff, to lose his badge access to the City Council offices. He now has to follow “visitor protocol,” which means he must be escorted through the main entrance to get to the back offices.

On Tuesday, Brosche’s executive assistant filed a formal employee complaint against Hughes, alleging he “accosted” her and angrily complained about her boss. Hughes called the complaint baseless, and the mayor’s office stood behind Hughes.

In the backdrop, the council chambers Wednesday were filled with JEA employees adamantly opposed to a sale. Some of them briefly applauded when Brosche refused to let Curry speak.

And no council members declared support for selling JEA, though many raised questions.

Meanwhile, calls paid for by an unknown group are making the rounds in the community, raising the suspicions of JEA employees and some council members.

The call alleges that JEA has “been mismanaged for years,” which Brosche called disgusting and said whoever is behind these calls should face the public. The calls also claim JEA has the highest electric rates in the state, which it doesn’t.

Michael Mace, managing director of Public Financial Management, a firm hired by JEA to assess all aspects of a potential sale, presented council members with a report on JEA’s potential value to a private buyer. He also walked through the hydra-like series of steps, trade-offs and potential complications of selling Jacksonville’s electric and water utility, which given its large size, Mace said would be one of the most complex of its kind in the United States.

The major revelation from the meeting was that JEA could be sold for a gross sale price ranging between $7.5-$11 billion. The city would net far less than that since JEA’s debts and other obligations would have to be subtracted out before City Hall would get any money. The net amount ranged between $2.9-6.4 billion.

The report presented by Mace did not include one of the biggest liabilities on JEA’s book, which is its unfunded pension liability. JEA’s most recent report shows it owes $554 million for pensions earned by its workers, an amount that would be paid by city taxpayers if the money doesn’t come from the utility’s revenue.

Howard, the JEA board chairman, said after the meeting that the half-cent sales tax approved by voters in 2016 “separately addressed” how to pay off the pension liability.

Beyond that, council members had pointed questions, and some doubts, about the rationale behind selling JEA.

City Councilman Finance Committee Garrett Dennis went a step further and slammed Howard. He told Howard point-blank that he should resign as board chairman. “In my opinion, it’s been a debacle,” he said.

Howard, who said he has no plans to resign, said he wasn’t surprised by the questions during the meeting. “The reality is that this is a tough question for the city of Jacksonville and it’s one that I anticipate will prompt a lot of robust debate,” he said.

Other council members said they didn’t hear a justification for making a change from a public utility to an investor-owned utility.

“I’m not sure what’s broken, first of all,” council member Tommy Hazouri said.

Councilman Danny Becton held his thumb and forefinger close together and said, “I really feel we’re only getting this much of the story.”

He said that before people get appraisals on their homes, they first sit down and decide that they want to sell their homes, but that part of the decision-making process seems to have been skipped over for JEA.

“We’ve really got the cart before the horse,” Councilman Al Ferraro said.
In a boat at sea one of the men began to bore a hole in the bottom of the boat. On being remonstrating with, he answered, "I am only boring under my own seat." "Yes," said his companions, "but when the sea rushes in we shall all be drowned with you."

thelakelander

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Re: Should Jacksonville sell (privatize) JEA?
« Reply #40 on: February 15, 2018, 08:37:49 AM »
Which municipalities still own their utility company? I know Gainesville does. Tampa and Orlando (or their counties) do not. Neither does Pinellas. South Florida has FPL.
Lakeland still owns its electric company, although the push to sell it comes up every few years. Other municipal owned utilities include Orlando Utilities Commission, Tallahassee, Ocala and Vero Beach. Outside of Florida, LA, Seattle, Austin, Memphis, Nashville, Omaha and Sacramento are all examples of municipalities that still owned their electric companies.
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vicupstate

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Re: Should Jacksonville sell (privatize) JEA?
« Reply #41 on: February 15, 2018, 09:30:06 AM »
Pretty obvious that the powers that be have already made up theirs minds and will try to ram this through.  Curry and Hughes are still in campaign 'seek and destroy' mode instead of the consensus building governing mode that they should be in.  That is a common malady of party operatives elected to office. 

This thing is going south in a hurry. If Curry really wants this to be considered on the merits, he needs to call a time-out, eat some humble pie, realize he isn't a dictator, apologize for his behavior and ask for a do-over.     
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pierre

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Re: Should Jacksonville sell (privatize) JEA?
« Reply #42 on: February 15, 2018, 09:37:36 AM »
So what Curry donor is pushing for this? He can say whatever he wants, but his position is obvious.

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Re: Should Jacksonville sell (privatize) JEA?
« Reply #43 on: February 15, 2018, 09:50:39 AM »
Pretty obvious that the powers that be have already made up theirs minds and will try to ram this through.  Curry and Hughes are still in campaign 'seek and destroy' mode instead of the consensus building governing mode that they should be in.  That is a common malady of party operatives elected to office. 

This thing is going south in a hurry. If Curry really wants this to be considered on the merits, he needs to call a time-out, eat some humble pie, realize he isn't a dictator, apologize for his behavior and ask for a do-over.     

Obvious?  From what I can see a report was requested... then generated... Virtually no one here read the draft report and I have not yet seen the final.  I would like to know what JEA is worth and what the city would get from a potential sale.  I would also like to know how it would affect rate payers, taxpayers, and employees... seems like basic governmental business to know what your assets are worth...

Here is what Curry said...

"Here’s what I would have said," Curry told News4Jax outside the meeting. "This needs to be done in a transparent way. This is information only. There would be no action taken here today, and that the lens that I would view all of this through would be: Is this good for ratepayers and taxpayers, and is this good for JEA employees?"
In a boat at sea one of the men began to bore a hole in the bottom of the boat. On being remonstrating with, he answered, "I am only boring under my own seat." "Yes," said his companions, "but when the sea rushes in we shall all be drowned with you."

vicupstate

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Re: Should Jacksonville sell (privatize) JEA?
« Reply #44 on: February 15, 2018, 10:45:57 AM »
Pretty obvious that the powers that be have already made up theirs minds and will try to ram this through.  Curry and Hughes are still in campaign 'seek and destroy' mode instead of the consensus building governing mode that they should be in.  That is a common malady of party operatives elected to office. 

This thing is going south in a hurry. If Curry really wants this to be considered on the merits, he needs to call a time-out, eat some humble pie, realize he isn't a dictator, apologize for his behavior and ask for a do-over.     

Obvious?  From what I can see a report was requested... then generated... Virtually no one here read the draft report and I have not yet seen the final.  I would like to know what JEA is worth and what the city would get from a potential sale.  I would also like to know how it would affect rate payers, taxpayers, and employees... seems like basic governmental business to know what your assets are worth...

Here is what Curry said...

"Here’s what I would have said," Curry told News4Jax outside the meeting. "This needs to be done in a transparent way. This is information only. There would be no action taken here today, and that the lens that I would view all of this through would be: Is this good for ratepayers and taxpayers, and is this good for JEA employees?"

Curry is all on board with a sale. His actions speak louder than his words. Calling a meeting when the council chair declined to, on Valentine's Day no less, and expecting someone besides the Council President to run the meeting for instance. His financial backer initiated the study. Curry replaced JEA Board members whose terms had not yet expired.  The outcome is predetermined as far as they are concerned. Now they are just trying to ram it through.  The only question is will they succeed.       
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