Author Topic: Jacksonville’s Overland Bridge highway construction project nearly complete  (Read 4884 times)

thelakelander

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Inch by inch, a state project to rethread a wider Interstate 95 above and through a busy part of Southside Jacksonville is edging closer to completion.

But despite recent sunny skies and minimal weather impacts to the enormous $159.2 million Overland Bridge begun almost five years ago, and evident progress on wider northbound lanes curving through San Marco, it won’t all be done by its predicted summer completion date.

As almost 160,000 vehicles per day travel every day through concrete canyons of barriers, pile-drivers and cranes, Florida Department of Transportation spokesman Ron Tittle said the wide, clean sections of concrete roadway now appearing on the northbound side should be open to traffic by June. But the entire project won’t be fully done until summer is over — hopefully.

Full article: http://jacksonville.com/news/metro/2017-05-19/jacksonville-s-overland-bridge-highway-construction-project-nearly-complete
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RiversideHusker

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It's been almost a year since this article was published and the project is still not finished, but almost done it seems. Any idea on when it should be complete and all the new lanes opened? The project site says Spring 2018, but it previously said Fall 2017 so not sure when it will be truly finished.

RiversideRambler

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The project has been going on so long, I can't tell if the project actually improved the flow of traffic or if it just seems better because there's less construction.

Jagsdrew

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There is (very slim) progress as I live near that mess in San Marco. 

I know that weather plays a factor and such, but at what point to we hold accountability for projects that go way over their anticipated completion date? Do the taxpayers pay for such overage? You can make the same case/argument for 295 between 95 and Buckman for the express lanes (was supposed to open end of 2016, pushed to mid-2017 and here we are now...)

Anyways, News4Jax had an article saying the project was supposed to be completed in mid-2016 but now is supposed to be end of March. BUT here we are at the end of April...
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pierre

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The project has been going on so long, I can't tell if the project actually improved the flow of traffic or if it just seems better because there's less construction.

It certainly has not helped the traffic going on 95 north in the afternoon unless you are exciting to downtown. Same bottleneck as before.

Charles Hunter

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There are often contract provisions that financially penalize a contractor when they exceed the allowed construction time. There are usually negotiations, where the contractor may claim extenuating circumstances, such as more 'weather days' than projected, or other reasons. Eventually, a figure will be determined. If a contractor has a history of being late, it can affect their ability to get new jobs.

Regarding the north/west -bound congestion, FDOT has started another project to address that. http://your10and95.com/

jagsonville

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The overland project has been moving along at a very sad slow pace. I also don’t think that it was designed to add enough lanes and the bottleneck near downtown will now be permanent.

Steve

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One thing I will say in this project’s defense: this was an operational project, done because the bridge was at end of life. This wasn’t done to expand the highway, but did result in that to a degree. The big expansion will be the Fuller Warren widening.

Steve

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Side note though: I think it’s batshit crazy the permanent signs aren’t up, even though most of the roadways are in their permanent configuration.

acme54321

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One thing I will say in this project’s defense: this was an operational project, done because the bridge was at end of life. This wasn’t done to expand the highway, but did result in that to a degree. The big expansion will be the Fuller Warren widening.

Exactly, this didn't have anything to do with adding lanes.  They were able to correct some things that were needed like adding the third south bound through lane and exits at Atlantic.  Other than the timeframe being so long I think it turned out pretty well.  FWIW FDOT originally estimated it to be a 5 year project.  After a bunch of public outcry they revised the timeline to 3 years, without changing the scope.  Shockingly it's taken 5 years.

remc86007

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Clearly it's behind schedule, but it's not like there were months at a time where nothing was done... I do really like the new ramp to the Main Street and Acosta; they make getting downtown from the Southside much less frightening than it was when everyone was moving three lanes over at the last second at 60 MPH.

marcuscnelson

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Side note though: I think it’s batshit crazy the permanent signs aren’t up, even though most of the roadways are in their permanent configuration.

This, so much. I went downtown for the Gate River Run a few weeks ago, and ended up in Brooklyn because I had no idea you were supposed to take the exit so far away from where it used to be, and by the time I realized it, it was too late and there were too many other cars in the way. If you miss that exit, you can't go anywhere else until you cross the Fuller Warren.

tufsu1

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One thing I will say in this project’s defense: this was an operational project, done because the bridge was at end of life. This wasn’t done to expand the highway, but did result in that to a degree. The big expansion will be the Fuller Warren widening.

sorry Steve, but BS - this was pretty much an expansion project (regardless of how it was packaged)

thelakelander

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Well we should all know by now, you can't pave your way out of congestion. Every project simply moves the bottleneck point. So now you'll need the I-10/95/Fuller Warren project, along with the widening of I-95 between the Southbank and JTB to align with these improvements. When that I-10/95 work is complete, you'll probably need to widen/reconstruct I-10 between Roosevelt and I-295.
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Steve

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One thing I will say in this project’s defense: this was an operational project, done because the bridge was at end of life. This wasn’t done to expand the highway, but did result in that to a degree. The big expansion will be the Fuller Warren widening.

sorry Steve, but BS - this was pretty much an expansion project (regardless of how it was packaged)

How is that BS? Was it not paid as an expansion project?

Also, how would anyone think that by widening a section of a highway, but not the bridge after it or the roadway before it that it would truly be transformative?