Author Topic: YOUR LAST HIKE...ever! If you like nature trails better read this.  (Read 3712 times)

Ocklawaha

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Most of you alive today are not aware of the love notes sent from Japan during World War II. Somewhere between 9,000 and 30,000 balloon bombs where filled with plague infested fleas, high explosives and other demonic sounding devices. The idea was simple, Japan had JETS, ROCKETS, HELICOPTERS and some say even an atomic bomb by the time of surrender. (There is strong evidence that they tested such a weapon in Korea in the last couple of days of the war...neither the US or Japan will confirm or deny this one).  Anyway, as an economy method to bomb the USA into surrender, Japan decided to use the jet stream to send high altitude balloons and their deadly cargo to us. (We hadn't discovered the jet stream yet). They were busy building odd looking circular racks for the bombs which were attached to the balloon and set loose with a vent that vented the gas as the air pressure increased over land.

 
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Japanese balloon bombs: A forgotten history

Posted: May 2, 2008 11:47 PM EDT

 
Balloon bombs, sent aloft by Japanese during WWII, reached West Coast, and one proved deadly
 
 
With hundreds maybe thousands never recovered, still a rare chance of risky encounter

By Christian Boris,

In 1944 and 1945, the Japanese military launched bomb-carrying balloons to strike the American homeland.  Many balloons landed in Oregon, including one that killed six people in Klamath County.

On May 5, 1945, a group of Sunday school students encountered a balloon bomb snagged in a tree near Bly in Klamath County. Thirteen-year-old Joan Patzke attempted to pull the balloon from the tree when the attached bomb exploded, killing five children and a woman, Elsie Mitchell.

The balloon bombs were launched with the hopes of igniting large forest fires across Western North America and creating general panic among the population. The hydrogen-filled balloons ascended into the prevailing jet stream flow which would carry the balloons across the Pacific in about three days.

By early 1945, balloons began to appear over the skies of the West Coast. Several of the bombs detonated as planned, while others landed without incident.

Landings occurred from Alaska to Mexico and as far east as Michigan. (Georgia)

When the media caught wind of the mystery balloons the U.S. Government Office of Censorship sought to quiet the stories out of fear that the Japanese would realize the weapons were effective and thus step up attacks.

The highest concentration of known balloon landings occurred from Alaska south to Northern California. A lethal balloon bomb was discovered in Alaska 10 years later, in 1955, while the last remnants of a non-lethal charge were found in Alaska in 1992.

"It is unlikely that an individual would just stumble across one, but if it were to happen I would recommend not touching any of these artifacts, but instead write down the location, take a picture if possible, and notify the Forest Service or BLM."

"It is likely that leftover bombs would be corroded and most likely covered in organic debris that has accumulated since World War II," added Claeyssens.

Balloon wreckage that is likely to survive includes metal framework as well the bomb load, which varied between one and five small bombs per balloon. Some of the bombs could remain lethal if their chemical components have not been compromised through years of decay



Today they could be ANYWHERE, A rusted old machine thing hanging in the top of a pine tree at Olustee, or half buried by the St. Marys River, or Pottsburg Creek. We know where about 3,000 of them landed, most of which caused little harm, but there are horror stories, some fairly recent of campers, hikers and outdoors families meeting a horrible end at the hands of the Imperial Army.

So why would anyone care to post this, well because nobody thinks it's possible... The way I do math, I figure something like 6,000-27,000 remain unaccounted for. We KNOW that most landed in the Pacific Northwest, where they are found all of the time. BUT, we also know, almost every state has found one or two, maybe more. The list of victims continues to climb and Japan has issued an appology, and is now putting up markers to make a memorial of the "last place you ever hiked". Sure, we'll never see one, but then your chances are 1,000X better then hitting the lotto and I don't like those odds.




OCKLAWAHA

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Re: YOUR LAST HIKE...ever! If you like nature trails better read this.
« Reply #1 on: July 24, 2008, 04:16:42 PM »
I saw a segment on these on PBS' history detectives show-- scary stuff. But, only on the West Coast. They (the show) found historians saying probably a 1,000 of these made it over here, out of, like, 10,000 sent or something ridiculous like that.

Jimmy Olsen

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Re: YOUR LAST HIKE...ever! If you like nature trails better read this.
« Reply #2 on: July 24, 2008, 04:42:50 PM »
Much like our bombing of Loas during the Vietnam War... Millions of bombs are still scattered through their countryside.

Ocklawaha

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Re: YOUR LAST HIKE...ever! If you like nature trails better read this.
« Reply #3 on: July 24, 2008, 07:08:11 PM »


Quote
Quote
I saw a segment on these on PBS' history detectives show-- scary stuff. But, only on the West Coast. They (the show) found historians saying probably a 1,000 of these made it over here, out of, like, 10,000 sent or something ridiculous like that.

 
Much like our bombing of Laos during the Vietnam War... Millions of bombs are still scattered through their countryside. 


Yeah, you gotta LOVE that history channel and PBS, without them we wouldn't have any history TV at all. The weird thing about this story is their numbers and mine??? Well, I went a bit deep in a read before posting this and decided to go with a ballpark number. Some sources post the Japanese numbers way high, like 50,000+ (being that the bombs were cheap and easy to build or fuel) which makes sense. Japan expended incredible amounts on it's defense, right down to the individuals who man - woman and child were willing to die for their "god" emperor. Japan has no natural resources so this was a weapon that could be farmed (silk) and Hydrogen gas.

Did we drop a million bombs on Laos? I know we dropped my brother-in-law right in the middle of it! Then the DOD sent the all-time greatest telegram home: "XXXX Brian - Shot down - picked up" Talk about your LONG, LONG, nights.

For certain the death counts have gone up over the years from the original Sunday School class, and some of these have been found in Alabama and Georgia as well as one in the panhandle of Florida, once upon a time. Sort of feel like you do, we know of 3 or 4 in the Southeast using the standard cockroach multiplier that might equate to a couple of hundred to a few thousand NOT FOUND down here. DEADLY STUFF MAN.

OCKLAWAHA

« Last Edit: July 24, 2008, 07:49:55 PM by Ocklawaha »

Jimmy Olsen

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Re: YOUR LAST HIKE...ever! If you like nature trails better read this.
« Reply #4 on: July 24, 2008, 07:34:15 PM »
http://www.bookmice.net/darkchilde/japan/balloon/bo10.jpg

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Did we drop a million bombs on Laos?

During the Vietnam War there was a Laos Civil War. Our troops were instructed to drop remaining bombs over Laos on the way back to base. Check out the episode of Anthony Bourdain: No Reservations coming on July 29th at 4:00 PM on the Travel Channel. Very interesting stuff

civil42806

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Re: YOUR LAST HIKE...ever! If you like nature trails better read this.
« Reply #5 on: July 24, 2008, 09:09:18 PM »
Who says they may have had an atomic bomb?  First I've ever heard of that, would like a reference please.  They did have a couple of experimental jets, helicopters are new to me, but sikorsky was flying some crude ones in the 40s as well, so thats certainly possible.

Ocklawaha

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« Reply #6 on: July 24, 2008, 10:51:45 PM »
I fist saw the story in a Neo-Nazi publication "The Barnes Review" which claims to undo history revision, they did an article back in the 1990's about Japans test site in Korea. Though I don't agree with their politics, they do have some interesting one-of-a-kind articles. I'm not using Barnes as 100% proof, but it's sources are pretty impressive. Meanwhile I stumbled over the articles by the Atlanta Constitution, end of WWII through Korea, they first broke the story, and Uncle Sam shut it down... QUICK. Here is the text...Hee Hee.

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1946 Atlanta Constitution Atom Bomb Articles


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Reporter David Snell
   David Snell, author of the story of Japan's successful atomic bomb test, was a member of the Constitution's reportorial staff when he joined the Army in 1945.

Snell, a native of Minden, LA, was in charge of the Constitution's News Bureau at Marietta immediately before entering the Army, having served for a while on the city staff in Atlanta.

During his Army service, Snell filed a number of stories to the Constitution both while in training in the United States and after arriving with the occupation forces in Korea. One of his stories in Korea was an interview with Bishop Arthur J. Moore, of Atlanta, who visited China, Japan, and Korea representing the American's Bishops's Association to survey church conditions preparatory to the return of missionaries.

In Korea, Snell was assigned to the 24th Criminal Investigation Detachment checking on crimes against the Unites States. His discovery of the atom bomb story was not in his official line of duty and was not a part of his official assignment.

While with the Constitution, Snell lived at Marietta. His wife is the former Julia Williams of Augusta, Ark. Their one son, Barry, was born while they resided in Marietta.

 
 
   Japan Developed Atom Bomb;

Russia Grabbed Scientists

Copyright 1946 by the Atlanta Constitution and David Snell.
 

Actual Test Was Success

Japan developed and successfully tested an atomic bomb three days prior to the end of the war.

She destroyed unfinished atomic bombs, secret papers and her atomic bomb plans only hours before the advance units of the Russian Army moved into Konan, Korea, site of the project.

Japanese scientists who developed the bomb are now in Moscow, prisoners of the Russians. They were tortured by their captors seeking atomic "know-how."

The Konan area is under rigid Russian control. They permit no American to visit the area. Once, even after the war, an American B-29 Superfortress en route to Konan was shot down by four Russian Yak fighters from nearby Hammung Airfield.

I learned this information from a Japanese officer, who said he was in charge of counter intelligence at the Konan project before the fall of Japan. He gave names, dates, facts and figures on the Japanese atomic project, which I submitted to United States Army Intelligence in Seoul. The War Department is withholding much of the information. To protect the man that told me this story, and at the request of the Army, he is here given a pseudonym, Capt. Tsetusuo Wakabayashi.

The story may throw light on Stalin's recent statement that America will not long have a monopoly on atomic weapons. Possibly also helps explains the stand taken by Henry A. Wallace. Perhaps also, it will help explain the heretofore unaccountable stalling of the Japanese in accepting our surrender terms as the Allies agreed to allow Hirohito to continue as puppet emperor. And perhaps it will throw light new light on the shooting down by the Russians of our B-29 on Aug. 29, 1945, in the Konan area.

When told this story, I was an agent with the Twenty-Fourth Criminal Investigation Department, operating in Korea. I was able to interview Capt. Wakabayashi, not as an investigator or as a member of the armed forces, but as a newspaperman. He was advised and understood thoroughly, that he was speaking for publication.

He was in Seoul, en route to Japan as a repatriate. The interview took place in a former Shinto temple on a mount overlooking Korea's capital city. The shrine had been converted into an hotel for transient Japanese en route to their homeland.

Since V-J Day wisps of information have drifted into the hands of U.S. Army Intelligence of the existence of a gigantic and mystery-shrouded industrial project operated during the closing months of the war in a mountain vastness near the Northern Korean coastal city of Konan. It was near here that Japan's uranium supply was said to exist.

This, the most complete account of activities at Konan to reach American ears, is believed to be the first time Japanese silence has been broken on the subject.

In a cave in a mountain near Konan, men worked against time, in final assembly of genzai bakuden, Japan's name for the atomic bomb. It was August 10, 1945 (Japanese time), only four days after an atomic bomb flashed in the sky over Hiroshima, and five days before Japan surrendered.

To the north, Russian hordes were spilling into Manchuria.

Shortly after midnight of that day a convey of Japanese trucks moved from the mouth of the cave, past watchful sentries. The trucks wound through valleys, past sleeping farm villages. It was August, and frogs in the mud of terraced rice paddies sang in a still night. In the cool predawn Japanese scientists and engineers loaded genzai bakudan aboard a ship in Konan.

Off the coast near an inlet in the Sea of Japan more frantic preparations were under way. All that day and night ancient ships, junks and fishing vessels moved into the anchorage.

Before dawn on Aug. 12 a robot launch chugged through the ships at anchor and beached itself on the inlet. Its passenger was genzai bakudan. A clock ticked.

The observers were 20 miles away. This waiting was difficult and strange to men who had worked relentlessly so long who knew their job had been completed too late.

OBSERVORS BLINDED BY FLASH

The light in the east where Japan lay grew brighter. The moment the sun peeped over the sea there was a burst of light at the anchorage blinding the observers who wore welders' glasses. The ball of fire was estimated to be 1,000 yards in diameter. A multicolored cloud of vapors boiled toward the heavens then mushroomed in the stratosphere.

The churn of water and vapor obscured the vessels directly under the burst. Ships and junks on the fringe burned fiercely at anchor. When the atmosphere cleared slightly the observers could detect several vessels had vanished.

Genzai bakudun in that moment had matched the brilliance of the rising sun in the east.

Japan had perfected and successfully tested an atomic bomb as cataclysmic as those that withered Hiroshimo and Nagasaki.

The time was short. The war was roaring to its climax. The advancing Russians would arrive at Konan before the weapon could be mounted in the ready Kamikaze planes to be thrown against any attempted landing by American troops on Japan's shores.

It was a difficult decision. But it had to be made.

The observers sped across the water, back to Konan. With the advance units of the Russian Army only hours away, the final scene of this gotterdammerung began. The scientists and engineers smashed machines, and destroyed partially completed genzai bakudans.

Before Russian columns reached Konan, dynamite sealed the secrets of the cave. But the Russians had come so quickly that the scientists could not escape.

This is the story told me by Capt. Wakabayashi.

Japan's struggle to produce and atomic weapon began in 1938, when German and Japanese scientists met to discuss a possible military use of energy locked in the atom.

No technical information was exchanged, only theories.

In 1940 the Nisina Laboratory of the Institute of Physical and Chemical Research in Tokyo had built one of the largest cyclotrons in the world. (Cyclotrons found in Tokyo by the invading Yanks were destroyed).

THOUGHT ATOMIC BOMB RISKY

The scientists continued to study atomic theory during the early days of the war, but it was not until the Unites States began to carry the war to Japan that they were able to interest the Government in a full-scale atomic project. Heretofore, the Government had considered such a venture too risky and too expensive. During the years following Pearl Harbor, Japan's militarists believed the Unites States could be defeated without the use of atomic weapons.

When task forces and invasion spearheads brought the war ever closer to the Japanese mainland, the Japanese Navy undertook the production of the atomic bomb as defense against amphibious operations. Atomic bombs were to be flown against Allied ships in Kamikaze suicide planes.

Capt. Wakabayashi estimated the area of total destruction of the bomb at one square mile.

The project was started at Nagoya, but its removal to Korea was necessitated when the B-29's began to lash industrial cities on the mainland of Japan.

"I consider the B-29 the primary weapon in the defeat of Japan" Capt. Wakabayashi declared. "The B-29 caused our project to be moved to Korea. We lost three months in the transfer. We would have had genzai bakudan three months earlier if it had not been for the B-29."

The Korean project was staffed by about 40,000 Japanese workers, of whom approximately 25,000 were trained engineers and scientists. The organization of the plant was set up so that the workers were restricted to their areas. The inner sanctum of the plant was deep in a cave. Here only 400 specialists worked.

KEPT IN DARK ON EACH OTHER'S WORK

One scientist was master director of the entire project. Six others, all eminent Japanese scientists were in charge of six phases of the bomb's production. Each of these six men were kept in ignorance of the work of the other five. (Names of these scientists are withheld by Army censorship).

The Russian's took most of the trained personnel prisoner, including the seven key men. One of the seven escaped in June, 1946, and fled to the American zone of occupation in Korea. U.S. Army Intelligence interrogated this man. Capt. Wakabayashi talked to him in Seoul. The scientist told of having been tortured by the Russians. He said all seven were tortured.

Capt. Wakabayashi said he learned from this scientist that the other six had been removed to Moscow.

"The Russians thrust burning splinters under the fingertips of these men. They poured water into their nasal passages. Our Japanese scientists will suffer death before they disclose their secrets to the Russians," he declared.

Capt. Wakabayashi said the Russians are making and extensive study of the Konan region.

When Edwin Pauley of the War Reparations Committee, inspected Northern Korea, he was allowed to see only certain areas, and was kept under rigid Russian supervision.

On Aug. 29, 1945, an American B-29 headed for Konan with a cargo of food and medical supplies, to be dropped over an Allied prisoner of war camp there. Four Russian Yak fighters from nearby Hammung Airfield circled the B-29 and signaled the pilot to land on the Hammung strip.

PILOT REFUSES; REDS FIRE

Lt. Jose H. Queen of Ashland, KY., pilot, refused to do so because the field was small, and headed back toward the Saipon base, to return "when things got straightened out with the Russians." Ten miles off the coast the Yak fighters opened fire and shot the B-29 down. None of the crew of 12 men were injured, although a Russian fighter strafed but missed Radio Operator Douglas Arthur.

The Russian later told Lt. Queen they saw the American markings but "weren't sure." because sometimes the Germans used American markings and they thought the Japs might too. This was nearly two weeks after the war ended.

Capt. Wakabayashi said the Japanese Counter Intelligence Corps at least a year before the atom bombing of Hiroshima learned there was a vast and mysterious project in the mountains of the eastern part of the United States. (Presumably the Manhattan project at Oak Ridge, Tenn). They believed, but were not sure, that atomic weapons were being produced there.

On the hand, he said, Allied Intelligence must have know of the atomic project at Konan, because of the perfect timing of the Hiroshimo bombing only six days before the long-scheduled Japanese naval test.

Perhaps here is the answer to moralists who question the decision of the United States to drop an atomic bomb.

The Japanese office, the interpreter and I sipped aromatic green tea as Capt. Wakabayashi unfolded his great and perhaps world-shaking story. His eyes flashed with pride behind the black-rimmed glassed. When the interview ended, he ushered us to the door and bowed very low.



Korea in August 1945
   When Japs Tested Atom Bomb—This was the war map of Korea in August, 1945, when the Russian spearhead pushed down the western coast in the drive on Konan, site of the Japanese atomic project. The atomic test was made at an unchartered inlet in the Sea of Japan. Today the 38th parallel just above Seoul divides Russian occupied territory from American. Konan remains tightly under Russian control. Russian proximity to Konan prompted the Japs decision to destroy the bomb. 


Japanese cyclotron
 AT WORK ON ATOM—Japan is known to have worked on Atomic energy as evidenced by this picture printed in 1940 showing an atom-smashing cyclotron. Such equipment was discovered by the U.S. Army after Japan's surrender and was destroyed by the Army then.


The USA nor Japan will talk about it. Giving credit to it, Japan knew every detail of the atomic bomb and even had "atomic teams" ready to go out and check out the sites where WE bombed them. Moreover, the Japanese I-submarine Captain that sank the USS Indianapolis, told the shocked American officers of that ship after the war, "we knew you were carrying the Atomic Bomb..." The odd thing is, until that moment the AMERICANS didn't know they had carried the bomb! 

Japan was early on with Helicopters, the Imperial Navy had them and it might have been tied to their underwater aircraft carriers. The first modern-navy= USA, Russia, China, RED October size boats. The japanese built the I class subs with aircraft hanger deck, recovery crane, launch catapult and a few bombers inside. At the end of the war we got all of them, when the Russians demanded a look, we had to inform them that sadly all had been sunk. In all of this politics, we did lose the only examples of the aircraft that went with these boats. At surrender, all aircraft were ordered pushed over the side. As for the Helicopters I have seen credit has been given a "Japanese Helicopter" as the cause of the sinking of one mystery submarine disappearence in the late war. It is believed a Japanese copter spotted the sub near the surface and depth charged it, there were NO other boats in the area when our boat blew up.

The helicopter might have been German, or perhaps an AMERICAN gyro. We sold two GYRO-COPTERS to Japan in 1932 for their Navy! The Nazi's had several versions of the things up and running.

JUST IN CASE YOU WANT TO RELAX...

Teddy Roosevelt said, "The last time we saw this much of a Naval Buildup in the South China Sea and Sea of Japan, there was a war... There's going to be a war!" 40 years to the day, we entered WWII thanks to JAPAN.
Today China is building a blue water navy, so is India. Japan isn't! Just a "Self Defense Force" that is one of the largest navies in the world. Their newest ships are the new  "HYUGA class Destroyers". 

Officially they are "Destroyers", but the Navy, err uh, self defense force says they are for helicopters... Odd, because the dimensions and data are a perfect fit for the new Joint Strike fighter some of which are headed to Japan. BTW Korea launched a similar ship in 2005, so Japan will launch a whole class of them. So anyone want to play teddy? War within 40 years? Sooner?

Ocklawaha