Author Topic: A. Philip Randolph: Creating a Vibrant Corridor  (Read 5829 times)

peestandingup

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Re: A. Philip Randolph: Creating a Vibrant Corridor
« Reply #15 on: April 10, 2011, 02:28:41 PM »
Well, 3 years later & I see nothing's changed with this corridor. Which is a shame because it's awesome (I drive through there all the time just to look at it). The housing fabric is neat too. http://www.metrojacksonville.com/article/2010-oct-urban-neighborhoods-the-eastside

I'm sure at this point, resources have been concentrated elsewhere.

duvaldude08

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Re: A. Philip Randolph: Creating a Vibrant Corridor
« Reply #16 on: April 10, 2011, 06:18:08 PM »
This is interesting. I actually made this recommendation about this being an entertainment district in a previous thread and of course everyone told me how dumb I was. LOL But to me its common sense. The area of town is the best, however lets look at how dangerous New Orleans. And that does not stop anyone from going to bourbon street to party. LOL It will be interesting to see what they come up with.
Jaguars 2.0

Garden guy

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Re: A. Philip Randolph: Creating a Vibrant Corridor
« Reply #17 on: April 10, 2011, 06:27:44 PM »
If there's not alot of money to be made quickly it's very hard to get any investors in jax..quick money is all they are looking for and that is another of the many reasons why the over building and limitless building permits are happening. These rich boys come in and try to make the most in the shortest amount of time...long term investments dont do well here apparently.

peestandingup

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Re: A. Philip Randolph: Creating a Vibrant Corridor
« Reply #18 on: April 10, 2011, 08:34:56 PM »
This is interesting. I actually made this recommendation about this being an entertainment district in a previous thread and of course everyone told me how dumb I was. LOL But to me its common sense. The area of town is the best, however lets look at how dangerous New Orleans. And that does not stop anyone from going to bourbon street to party. LOL It will be interesting to see what they come up with.

I seriously doubt anyone's coming up with anything for this area. It actually looks more dead now than it did in these 3 year old photos. There's people out & about, but not exactly what I'd call "productive looking" people. And there's hardly any businesses open.

But that entire area is pretty amazing IMO. And it's in a good area, adjacent to the sports complexes, downtown & Springfield. Walkable, urban, historical, most the housing/building stock still remains, etc. Can't understand why that area hasn't had more focus put on it.

Well, actually I can (it's in Jacksonville). And it's like GG said, apparently they see no value in working with what you have & preservation.

buckethead

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Re: A. Philip Randolph: Creating a Vibrant Corridor
« Reply #19 on: April 10, 2011, 09:50:13 PM »
Let's put our moneys where our mouths are.

These properties can likely be had for reasonable prices. They are lovely. Ready to look just like so many pictures we've seen presented here. Bustling with visitors and customers. Beautiful brick facades with classic awnings over inviting doors. Shady, grand oaks... Pavers for walkways and cobblestone streets.

We complain about the GOB's who incidentally, like to manage businesses which tend to prosper. (i.e. turn a profit rather than a loss) Profitability is the determining factor in the feasibility of economic venture. There's always room for a non profit, but as an exception, rather than the rule.

This area is far from desirable from a business standpoint, at least through the eyes of someone who has lived in Ponte Vedra for the last 15 years. Foot traffic is there, but as someone mentioned earlier, not necessarily the kind of foot traffic a business needs to survive. (people hanging out looking quite unproductive, homeless, predatory) *come and git me... I can only calls ems likes I sees ems*

Sporting events can prop up a business during their respective seasons. (Jags especially, while the Suns, minimally) A business needs more than a few months of steady business to keep it's doors open for the entire year.

Anyone ever look at the concentration of sexual offenders in 32206? Plenty (and then some), with most north of 8th and east of Iona. (is there a halfway house on Evergreen?) (Yes, I checked PVB as well)

Yup... It's still early, even for urban pioneers, down that particular corridor. Too early for you???

mbwright

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Re: A. Philip Randolph: Creating a Vibrant Corridor
« Reply #20 on: April 10, 2011, 09:56:01 PM »
look quick, because the old grocery store, two story brick building, towards the south end of the street has a bright orange condemed/unsafe structure tag.  I also noticed a number  (too many in my opinion) not too far away in springfied, but I guess that is another issue.  It should be vvery clear that demolishing a historic area does not save it, nor revive it.  just look at LaVilla.

peestandingup

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Re: A. Philip Randolph: Creating a Vibrant Corridor
« Reply #21 on: April 10, 2011, 10:51:30 PM »
Let's put our moneys where our mouths are.

These properties can likely be had for reasonable prices. They are lovely. Ready to look just like so many pictures we've seen presented here. Bustling with visitors and customers. Beautiful brick facades with classic awnings over inviting doors. Shady, grand oaks... Pavers for walkways and cobblestone streets.

We complain about the GOB's who incidentally, like to manage businesses which tend to prosper. (i.e. turn a profit rather than a loss) Profitability is the determining factor in the feasibility of economic venture. There's always room for a non profit, but as an exception, rather than the rule.

This area is far from desirable from a business standpoint, at least through the eyes of someone who has lived in Ponte Vedra for the last 15 years. Foot traffic is there, but as someone mentioned earlier, not necessarily the kind of foot traffic a business needs to survive. (people hanging out looking quite unproductive, homeless, predatory) *come and git me... I can only calls ems likes I sees ems*

Sporting events can prop up a business during their respective seasons. (Jags especially, while the Suns, minimally) A business needs more than a few months of steady business to keep it's doors open for the entire year.

Anyone ever look at the concentration of sexual offenders in 32206? Plenty (and then some), with most north of 8th and east of Iona. (is there a halfway house on Evergreen?) (Yes, I checked PVB as well)

Yup... It's still early, even for urban pioneers, down that particular corridor. Too early for you???

I honestly wouldn't mind buying a second home over there for cheap & spending some of my time with it. I don't know the crime stats right off, but I'm sure they got their fair share, so getting the wife & kid to join me would be another thing. ;)

The problem as I see it is that there just doesn't seem to be any interest in the area from really anyone, so I'd likely be sitting on a house for many many years until things got decent enough for "full time living status". They may never, who knows. That's sorta the problem with a lot of urban areas in Jax (little interest from the city & it's residents as a whole).

That's what's different from some similar rough neighborhoods in other cities (someone mentioned New Orleans). Places like that are a lot more condensed & not as spread out as Jax, so its easier for a bunch of people to move in & try to make the neighborhood better, while not being so isolated as you would be here. DC was the same way when I lived there. Many places are. But connectivity & condensity are a problem here. Hell, I didn't even know this neighborhood existed until I read it here. You could say that's my fault, but you could also say that Jax didn't make it easy for me to discover either.

Another problem is, like you mentioned, there's a lot of missions, shelters, projects & things of that sort here that the city sorta just peppered all through these downtown neighborhoods (Springfield too) because that's where they were needed at the time. Well, they were needed here because of working people & middle/upper class families abandoning the cores in the first place & then shoving all the poor into these inner-city neighborhoods. Basically putting all of the "bad elements" into one area so it doesn't bleed over into our beloved suburbs. ::) It's unfortunate, but it is what it is.

But hey, if a bunch of MJ readers wanna start buying up blocks of homes over here & setting up shops & stuff like that, I'm in. ;D
« Last Edit: April 10, 2011, 10:57:10 PM by peestandingup »

mtraininjax

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Re: A. Philip Randolph: Creating a Vibrant Corridor
« Reply #22 on: April 12, 2011, 07:55:25 AM »
Quote
hope they recommend retrofitting those new Sports District parking garages with retail space.

The "retail" spaces for the library parking deck have not even taken off after how many years? With less foot traffic than those spots, how are these retail spaces in the sports area expected to survive? Let's see if the Pub across from the arena/baseball park survives before we call this the new retail mecca of downtown.
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peestandingup

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Re: A. Philip Randolph: Creating a Vibrant Corridor
« Reply #23 on: April 12, 2011, 03:13:45 PM »
Quote
hope they recommend retrofitting those new Sports District parking garages with retail space.

The "retail" spaces for the library parking deck have not even taken off after how many years? With less foot traffic than those spots, how are these retail spaces in the sports area expected to survive? Let's see if the Pub across from the arena/baseball park survives before we call this the new retail mecca of downtown.

I don't think anyone's saying that at all. In fact, the consensus is saying its probably the exact opposite these days (especially with the Jags' fate sorta up in the air). It's just the place has so much potential & history. But a lot of places in Jax had the same potential too & you see what happened to them (Lavilla for instance).

I think Jax as a whole can only consciously handle so much of these types of areas at a time. And Springfield sorta has that ball right now (and as awesome as it is, even its struggling in a lot of aspects nowadays). East Jacksonville is probably nowhere on the radar & likely won't be for some time. It's a shame, because if this were in a lot of other cities, it would get a lot of focus & be on its way to the greatness it deserves.