Author Topic: Pokemon Go  (Read 6000 times)

funwithteeth

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Re: Pokemon Go
« Reply #15 on: July 11, 2016, 02:42:34 PM »
At about 9:30 last night I stopped behind the Publix in Riverside to catch a Bellsprout. I think I made nervous the woman who was walking her dog alone on the same path.

FlaBoy

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Re: Pokemon Go
« Reply #16 on: July 11, 2016, 03:02:55 PM »
I am going to try it out today so as to decide to approve it or not for my 11 year old.  Anyone have any thoughts on younger age users?

The only real danger is wandering too far off. It is definitely a majority 20 and 30 something aged folks playing from what I have seen. Probably smart for your kid to only wander around with a friend too.

Non-RedNeck Westsider

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Re: Pokemon Go
« Reply #17 on: July 11, 2016, 03:07:50 PM »
I guess I'm one of the few who is not a fan.  I'm kind of meh on the whole geo-location game in general though, nothing specific against Pokemon.

My only suggestion would be to require the use of a VR headset to play and then let nature take its course.  ;)
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JeffreyS

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Re: Pokemon Go
« Reply #18 on: July 11, 2016, 03:21:13 PM »
I am going to try it out today so as to decide to approve it or not for my 11 year old.  Anyone have any thoughts on younger age users?

Hey Jeff, as long as your 11 year old isn't wandering around alone in isolated areas, he/she should be fine. The beach, Avenues, Town Center, public parks, or any other safe, visible spot you'd let your kid wander around at regardless of the game should be fine. The bigger danger is probably injury from not being aware of your surroundings as you stare at your phone wandering.



I am going to try it out today so as to decide to approve it or not for my 11 year old.  Anyone have any thoughts on younger age users?

The only real danger is wandering too far off. It is definitely a majority 20 and 30 something aged folks playing from what I have seen. Probably smart for your kid to only wander around with a friend too.


Thanks guys.
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Sonic101

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Re: Pokemon Go
« Reply #19 on: July 12, 2016, 07:33:51 AM »

My only suggestion would be to require the use of a VR headset to play and then let nature take its course.  ;)

Omg, or an AR headset like Microsoft Hololens, that would be amazing.

TheCat

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Re: Pokemon Go
« Reply #20 on: July 12, 2016, 11:37:15 AM »




A new smartphone game that has fans chasing virtual monsters through real-life city streets has boosted the market value of Nintendo Co. by $9 billion in just a few days, as investors cheered the Japanese videogame maker’s first mobile-gaming hit.

“Pokémon Go,” which was released less than a week ago, already ranks among the most-downloaded and top-grossing smartphone apps. But its sudden success is raising questions about the privacy and security technologies fueling the game, as well as the physical risks of playing it.

The smartphone app lets players scour parks, subway stops and other locations for cute monsters. It uses a technology called augmented reality, which blends digital images with a person’s view of the real world through the phone’s camera. The technology is the main feature behind a coming headset from Microsoft Corp. called HoloLens.

http://www.wsj.com/articles/pokemon-chasing-investors-send-nintendo-shares-soaring-1468228206

The game has been available for devices running Apple Inc.’s iOS and Google’s Android in the U.S., Australia and New Zealand since Wednesday. In the U.S., it has racked up more than two million downloads on iOS devices and is generating roughly $1.6 million in revenue daily from in-app purchases, according to market researcher Sensor Tower Inc.

Nintendo shares surged 25% in Tokyo on Monday—a welcome relief for the company after the unsteady launch of its first mobile app, Miitomo, in March. Much attention has swirled around games potentially involving Nintendo’s signature characters such as Mario. Instead, the company’s first hit stems from its partnership with the companies that developed “Pokémon Go”: Pokémon Co., which is 32%-owned by Nintendo, and Niantic Inc., a spinout from Google parent Alphabet Inc.