Author Topic: Mars Lives.  (Read 76900 times)

Ocklawaha

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Re: Mars Lives.
« Reply #30 on: August 04, 2008, 04:35:33 PM »
Damn! I KNEW IT! When my kids were in their teens, I suggested they were space cadets... Now I know!

OCKLAWAHA

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Re: Mars Lives.
« Reply #31 on: September 03, 2008, 09:27:09 AM »
Mars Rovers update... yep... they are still alive... :)

http://marsrovers.jpl.nasa.gov/newsroom/pressreleases/20080826a.html
In a boat at sea one of the men began to bore a hole in the bottom of the boat. On being remonstrating with, he answered, "I am only boring under my own seat." "Yes," said his companions, "but when the sea rushes in we shall all be drowned with you."

Jason

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Re: Mars Lives.
« Reply #32 on: September 03, 2008, 09:40:31 AM »
Amazing stuff.  Can't wait to hear NASA declare a manned mission to Mars.

BridgeTroll

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Re: Mars Lives.
« Reply #33 on: September 03, 2008, 09:51:43 AM »
That could be a great debate question... NASA funding, lunar and mars exploration.
In a boat at sea one of the men began to bore a hole in the bottom of the boat. On being remonstrating with, he answered, "I am only boring under my own seat." "Yes," said his companions, "but when the sea rushes in we shall all be drowned with you."

Jason

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Re: Mars Lives.
« Reply #34 on: September 03, 2008, 10:22:02 AM »
Does anyone know if there has been more discussion on the possible next generation of Space Shuttles?

BridgeTroll

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Re: Mars Lives.
« Reply #35 on: September 03, 2008, 10:29:21 AM »
As far as I can tell we will not go back to shuttles in the near future.  The next generation of rockets is currently being developed.  Shuttles never lived up to the "inexpensive reusable" concept as it was envisioned.  Rockets are cheaper, safer, and more reliable...

http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/constellation/orion/
In a boat at sea one of the men began to bore a hole in the bottom of the boat. On being remonstrating with, he answered, "I am only boring under my own seat." "Yes," said his companions, "but when the sea rushes in we shall all be drowned with you."

BridgeTroll

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Re: Mars Lives.
« Reply #36 on: September 03, 2008, 10:36:56 AM »
In a boat at sea one of the men began to bore a hole in the bottom of the boat. On being remonstrating with, he answered, "I am only boring under my own seat." "Yes," said his companions, "but when the sea rushes in we shall all be drowned with you."

Jason

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Re: Mars Lives.
« Reply #37 on: September 03, 2008, 10:44:05 AM »
Safer?  I think as an astronaut I would rather a nice soft landing in a shuttle versus a "crash" landing in a capsule out in the middle of the ocean.

IMO, being able to reuse something (even if it is more expansive) gives a better understanding of how well it withstands the rigors of launch, zero gravity, and re-entry.  A one time use rocket doesn't leave much to examine once the astronauts are home. 

Plus rockets just look so "soviet" and the Shuttles look futuristic and cutting edge.  :)

gatorback

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Re: Mars Lives.
« Reply #38 on: September 11, 2008, 05:26:23 AM »
What if we put lipstick on the rockets?  I bet that would make them look less soviet. Lol.
« Last Edit: September 11, 2008, 05:31:36 AM by gatorback »
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Ocklawaha

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Re: Mars Lives.
« Reply #39 on: September 11, 2008, 10:42:13 AM »
Inside the Martin Waters? Shiver me timbers Popeye, that's some big bass!



"If an eel swims out
and bites you on your snout
that's a moray!"


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Re: Mars Lives.
« Reply #40 on: September 30, 2008, 09:14:55 AM »
http://news.yahoo.com/s/nm/20080929/sc_nm/us_mars_phoenix_1

Mars dust resembles seawater, NASA extends mission By Maggie Fox, Health and Science Editor
Mon Sep 29, 3:57 PM ET
 


NASA extended the mission of the busy Phoenix lander on Monday, saying it will operate until it dies in the cold, dark Martian winter.

The lander found evidence that the chemical makeup of the dust on the surface of Mars resembles that of sea water, adding to evidence that liquid water that once may have supported life flowed on the planet's surface.

The Phoenix lander already has operated far longer than expected when it was dropped onto the Martian surface in May, and its controllers said they would squeeze every drop of life they could out of the solar-powered lander.

"We are literally trying to make hay as the sun shines," Barry Goldstein, Phoenix project manager at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California, told reporters.

Scheduled to last just 90 Martian days, known as sols, the lander has already operated for more than 120.

But the sun will soon dip below the horizon until April. Already the lander is getting less power, after a summer of light-filled days akin to the months of daylight at Earth's poles in the summer.

In July, the Phoenix team reported definitive proof of water after the lander scraped up ice. It also found perchlorate, a chemical compound used by plants and microbes and it has sent back the first image of a speck of red Martian dust taken through an atomic force microscope.

The latest analysis shows evidence of a carbonate chemical, likely calcium carbonate, best known as limestone, said William Boynton, who leads a team operating the lander's Thermal and Evolved-Gas Analyzer at the University of Arizona.

And, said JPL's Michael Hecht, further analysis shows the Martian dust is about as alkaline as seawater, with a pH of 8.3, more evidence that life could have existed on Mars.

Mars weatherman Jim Whiteway of the University of Toronto said the lander has seen snow, frost and clouds forming. "This is now occurring every night," he said -- although it is not yet clear whether any snow reaches the surface.

Peter Smith, Phoenix principal investigator at the University of Arizona, said Mars wobbles more than Earth does as it spins, so sometimes its poles point directly at the Sun. They would be warmer then, perhaps warm enough to melt ice that Phoenix has confirmed lies just below the red dust.

"If you were to sweep away this thin soil layer on what looks like this flat plain you would find it is more like a skating rink," Smith said.

"Is this a habitable zone on Mars? I think we are approaching this hypothesis," he added.

Smith said the scientists plan to turn on a microphone that was supposed to record the lander's descent in May but did not. "We are going to try and turn on this microphone and try to listen to Mars for the first time," he said.

In a boat at sea one of the men began to bore a hole in the bottom of the boat. On being remonstrating with, he answered, "I am only boring under my own seat." "Yes," said his companions, "but when the sea rushes in we shall all be drowned with you."

Doctor_K

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Re: Mars Lives.
« Reply #41 on: September 30, 2008, 09:52:42 AM »
Safer?  I think as an astronaut I would rather a nice soft landing in a shuttle versus a "crash" landing in a capsule out in the middle of the ocean.

IMO, being able to reuse something (even if it is more expansive) gives a better understanding of how well it withstands the rigors of launch, zero gravity, and re-entry.  A one time use rocket doesn't leave much to examine once the astronauts are home. 

Plus rockets just look so "soviet" and the Shuttles look futuristic and cutting edge.  :)
Not to split hairs on the subject, but I think I read that NASA's Orion capsules won't even be making ocean landings - they'll be making land-bound landings, a la the current Russian Soyuz capability.

Also, thanks to BT's always-apt postings and renderings, the Ares V will be using near-duplicates of the current STS (Shuttle) Solid Rocket Boosters; there will be partial carryover of technology.  In doing so, NASA is indeed using its knowledge of how the SRBs held up over the course of the STS program and applying it forward to the next generation of space vehicles and launch systems.

As much as I'm emotionally attached to the Space Shuttle (as I grew up during its heyday), I think that in the grand scheme of things the Shuttle will end up being a sort of evolutionary cul-de-sac in terms of Earth-launched spaceflight capabilities.  Orion, as a successor to and the evolution of Apollo/Mercury/Gemini, demonstrates this, IMO.
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Jason

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Re: Mars Lives.
« Reply #42 on: September 30, 2008, 09:52:47 AM »
Neat stuff!  I wonder if the Martian's know we're snooping around...

Jason

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Re: Mars Lives.
« Reply #43 on: September 30, 2008, 09:54:50 AM »
Safer?  I think as an astronaut I would rather a nice soft landing in a shuttle versus a "crash" landing in a capsule out in the middle of the ocean.

IMO, being able to reuse something (even if it is more expansive) gives a better understanding of how well it withstands the rigors of launch, zero gravity, and re-entry.  A one time use rocket doesn't leave much to examine once the astronauts are home. 

Plus rockets just look so "soviet" and the Shuttles look futuristic and cutting edge.  :)
Not to split hairs on the subject, but I think I read that NASA's Orion capsules won't even be making ocean landings - they'll be making land-bound landings, a la the current Russian Soyuz capability.

Also, thanks to BT's always-apt postings and renderings, the Ares V will be using near-duplicates of the current STS (Shuttle) Solid Rocket Boosters; there will be partial carryover of technology.  In doing so, NASA is indeed using its knowledge of how the SRBs held up over the course of the STS program and applying it forward to the next generation of space vehicles and launch systems.

As much as I'm emotionally attached to the Space Shuttle (as I grew up during its heyday), I think that in the grand scheme of things the Shuttle will end up being a sort of evolutionary cul-de-sac in terms of Earth-launched spaceflight capabilities.  Orion, as a successor to and the evolution of Apollo/Mercury/Gemini, demonstrates this, IMO.


I didn't know that, thanks for the info.  How are the land-bound landing done?  Parachutes and bubble wrap?  :)

BridgeTroll

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Re: Mars Lives.
« Reply #44 on: September 30, 2008, 10:05:27 AM »
Safer?  I think as an astronaut I would rather a nice soft landing in a shuttle versus a "crash" landing in a capsule out in the middle of the ocean.

IMO, being able to reuse something (even if it is more expansive) gives a better understanding of how well it withstands the rigors of launch, zero gravity, and re-entry.  A one time use rocket doesn't leave much to examine once the astronauts are home. 

Plus rockets just look so "soviet" and the Shuttles look futuristic and cutting edge.  :)
Not to split hairs on the subject, but I think I read that NASA's Orion capsules won't even be making ocean landings - they'll be making land-bound landings, a la the current Russian Soyuz capability.

Also, thanks to BT's always-apt postings and renderings, the Ares V will be using near-duplicates of the current STS (Shuttle) Solid Rocket Boosters; there will be partial carryover of technology.  In doing so, NASA is indeed using its knowledge of how the SRBs held up over the course of the STS program and applying it forward to the next generation of space vehicles and launch systems.

As much as I'm emotionally attached to the Space Shuttle (as I grew up during its heyday), I think that in the grand scheme of things the Shuttle will end up being a sort of evolutionary cul-de-sac in terms of Earth-launched spaceflight capabilities.  Orion, as a successor to and the evolution of Apollo/Mercury/Gemini, demonstrates this, IMO.

Thanks for the insight... You are correct... we will be doing landings on land using parachutes and airbags.  The SRBs will be used on both Ares I and V.  Ares I looks like the first stage will be SRB followed by a second stage standard liquid fuel.  Ares V will use two SRBs in combination with liquid fuel for first stage, then liquid fuel for subsequent stages...
In a boat at sea one of the men began to bore a hole in the bottom of the boat. On being remonstrating with, he answered, "I am only boring under my own seat." "Yes," said his companions, "but when the sea rushes in we shall all be drowned with you."