Author Topic: Mayo Clinic to exit Waycross  (Read 4795 times)

spuwho

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Mayo Clinic to exit Waycross
« on: November 20, 2015, 10:46:51 AM »
4 years ago Mayo Clinic Jacksonville cut a deal to acquire and operate the hospital in Waycross GA from Satilla Health.

Mayo announced today that they are returning the hospital back to Satilla Health and the local community.

It will not close, only the operational leadership will change.

RattlerGator

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Re: Mayo Clinic to exit Waycross
« Reply #1 on: November 20, 2015, 12:14:02 PM »
Hmmmmm . . . where is this news? Haven't seen it online anywhere.

thekillingwax

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Re: Mayo Clinic to exit Waycross
« Reply #2 on: November 20, 2015, 12:55:59 PM »
If it is true, it doesn't shock me. It was basically Mayo in name only. They still use St. Vincent's for cardiac intervention. I think Mayo is just selling their image at this point. The joint venture with St. Vincent's to make a cancer center was a direct response to Baptist scoring MD Anderson.

CCMjax

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Re: Mayo Clinic to exit Waycross
« Reply #3 on: November 20, 2015, 01:12:11 PM »
Um, that's weird.  Because there is a Mayo project currently in design that will be in Waycross.
"The first man who, having enclosed a piece of ground, bethought himself of saying 'This is mine,' and found people simple enough to believe him, was the real founder of civil society." - Jean Jacques Rousseau

spuwho

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Re: Mayo Clinic to exit Waycross
« Reply #4 on: November 20, 2015, 11:20:55 PM »
Hmmmmm . . . where is this news? Haven't seen it online anywhere.

http://m.jacksonville.com/#article=679913C29ED1C8AEF4D3BBBF87A2AF3DF60B

Mayo is building a family medicine practice office in Waycross. That will proceed.

RattlerGator

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Re: Mayo Clinic to exit Waycross
« Reply #5 on: November 21, 2015, 06:17:15 AM »
Thanks, spuwho. Given the fairly recent decision to do the Waycross initiative, I can't help but wonder if this is related -- even if only tangentially -- to the apparent cratering of ObamaCare.

ObamaCare
http://www.bloombergview.com/articles/2015-11-19/obamacare-insurers-are-suffering-that-won-t-end-well-

Hospital monopolies
http://www.wsj.com/articles/the-obamacare-effect-hospital-monopolies-1429480447

There's so much transformation going on these days, for good and bad it seems, and it will be years before a real assessment can be made. But ObamaCare does appear to be staring at the much-predicted death spiral. However, much sooner than anticipated.
« Last Edit: November 21, 2015, 06:50:58 AM by RattlerGator »

The_Choose_1

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Re: Mayo Clinic to exit Waycross
« Reply #6 on: November 21, 2015, 08:16:06 AM »
Thanks, spuwho. Given the fairly recent decision to do the Waycross initiative, I can't help but wonder if this is related -- even if only tangentially -- to the apparent cratering of ObamaCare.

ObamaCare
http://www.bloombergview.com/articles/2015-11-19/obamacare-insurers-are-suffering-that-won-t-end-well-

Hospital monopolies
http://www.wsj.com/articles/the-obamacare-effect-hospital-monopolies-1429480447

There's so much transformation going on these days, for good and bad it seems, and it will be years before a real assessment can be made. But ObamaCare does appear to be staring at the much-predicted death spiral. However, much sooner than anticipated.
When Obamacare dies. I hope the sick people without Insurance flood all Hospitals and take a lot of these fat cats down the same drain. And the Federal Governments tell the Hospitals we are not going to give you any more money. Look at the Ass Clown we have here in Florida Ricky Scott, he hates Hospitals and they hate him. Go ahead flush Obamacare and i can't wait till you sit and spin down your own drain RG!~
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spuwho

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Re: Mayo Clinic to exit Waycross
« Reply #7 on: November 21, 2015, 05:20:28 PM »
Per the NY Times:

Many Say High Deductibles Make Their Health Law Insurance All but Useless

http://mobile.nytimes.com/2015/11/15/us/politics/many-say-high-deductibles-make-their-health-law-insurance-all-but-useless.html

when they get sick: sky-high deductibles that are leaving some newly insured feeling nearly as vulnerable as they were before they had coverage.

“The deductible, $3,000 a year, makes it impossible to actually go to the doctor,” said David R. Reines, 60, of Jefferson Township, N.J., a former hardware salesman with chronic knee pain. “We have insurance, but can’t afford to use it.”

In many states, more than half the plans offered for sale through HealthCare.gov, the federal online marketplace, have a deductible of $3,000 or more, a New York Times review has found. Those deductibles are causing concern among Democrats — and some Republican detractors of the health law, who once pushed high-deductible health plans in the belief that consumers would be more cost-conscious if they had more of a financial stake or skin in the game.

“We could not afford the deductible,” said Kevin Fanning, 59, who lives in North Texas, near Wichita Falls. “Basically I was paying for insurance I could not afford to use.”

He dropped his policy.

As the health care law enters its third annual open enrollment period, premiums and subsidies have been one of the administration’s main selling points.

“Most Americans will find an option that costs less than $75 a month,” President Obama said.

Sylvia Mathews Burwell, the secretary of health and human services, issued a report analyzing premiums in the 38 states that use HealthCare.gov. “Eight out of 10 returning consumers will be able to buy a plan with premiums less than $100 a month after tax credits,” she said.

But in interviews, a number of consumers made it clear that premiums were only one side of the affordability equation.

“Our deductible is so high, we practically pay for all of our medical expenses out of pocket,” said Wendy Kaplan, 50, of Evanston, Ill. “So our policy is really there for emergencies only, and basic wellness appointments.”

Her family of four pays premiums of $1,200 a month for coverage with an annual deductible of $12,700.

In Miami, the median deductible, according to HealthCare.gov, is $5,000. (Half of the plans are above the median, and half below it.) In Jackson, Miss., the comparable figure is $5,500. In Chicago, the median deductible is $3,400. In Phoenix, it is $4,000; in Houston and Des Moines, $3,000.

Ms. Burwell said the administration had “seen high levels of satisfaction with the marketplace.”

And the marketplaces do vary. In Newark, some plans have no deductible, although the median deductible is $2,000, according to HealthCare.gov.

Health officials and insurance counselors cite several mitigating factors. All plans must cover preventive services likemammograms and colonoscopies without a deductible or co-payment. Some plans may help pay for some items, like generic drugs or visits to a primary care doctor, before patients have met the deductible. Under the Affordable Care Act, health plans must have an overall limit on out-of-pocket costs, to protect people with serious illness against financial ruin.

In addition, people with particularly low incomes can obtain discounts known as cost-sharing reductions, which lower their deductibles and other out-of-pocket costs if they choose midlevel silver plans. Consumer advocates say this assistance makes insurance a good bargain for people with annual incomes from 100 percent to 250 percent of the poverty level ($11,770 to $29,425 for an individual).

To those worried about high out-of-pocket costs, Dave Chandra, a policy analyst at the liberal-leaning Center on Budget and Policy Priorities, has some advice: “Everyone should come back to the marketplace and shop. You may get a better deal.”

But for many consumers, the frustration is real, as is the financial strain. In employer-sponsored health plans, deductibles have also been rising as companies shift costs to workers. Still, the average annual deductible in employer plans, $1,320 for individual coverage according to the Kaiser Family Foundation, is considerably less than the deductibles in many marketplace plans.

The Internal Revenue Service defines a high-deductible health plan as one with an annual deductible of at least $1,300 for individual coverage or $2,600 for family coverage.

Sara Rosenbaum, a professor of health law and policy at George Washington University who supports the health law, said the rising deductibles were part of a trend that she described as the “degradation of health insurance.”

Insurers, she said, “designed plans with a hefty use of deductibles and cost-sharing in order to hold down premiums” for low- and moderate-income consumers shopping in the public marketplaces.

But the deductibles are so high they may be scaring away some consumers.

Alexis C. Phillips, 29, of Houston, is the kind of consumer federal officials would like to enroll this fall. But after reviewing the available plans, she said, she concluded: “The deductibles are ridiculously high. I will never be able to go over the deductible unless something catastrophic happened to me. I’m better off not purchasing that insurance and saving the money in case something bad happens.”

People who go without insurance next year may be subject to a penalty of $695 or about 2.5 percent of their household income, whichever is greater.

Karin Rosner, a 45-year-old commercial freelance writer who lives in the Bronx, pays about $300 a month, after a subsidy, for a silver insurance plan with a $1,750 deductible and a limit of $4,000 a year on out-of-pocket expenses.

She is extremely nearsighted and has an eye condition that puts her at risk for a detached retina, but has put off visits to a retina specialist because, she said, she would have to pay the entire cost out of pocket.

“While my premiums are affordable, the out-of-pocket expenses required to meet the deductible are not,” said Ms. Rosner, who makes about $30,000 a year.

Mr. Fanning, the North Texan, said he and his wife had a policy with a monthly premium of about $500 and an annual deductible of about $10,000 after taking account of financial assistance. Their income is about $32,000 a year.

The Fannings dropped the policy in July after he had a one-night hospital stay and she had tests for kidney problems, and the bills started to roll in.

Josie Gibb of Albuquerque pays about $400 a month in premiums, after subsidies, for a silver-level insurance plan with a deductible of $6,000. “The deductible,” she said, “is so high that I have to pay for everything all year — visits with a gynecologist, a dermatologist, all blood work, all tests. It’s really just a catastrophic policy.”

Another consumer, Anne Cornwell of Chattanooga, Tenn., said she was excited when Congress passed the Affordable Care Act because she had been uninsured for several years. She is glad that she and her husband now have insurance, because he has had tonsil cancer, heart problems andkidney stones this year.

But with a $10,000 deductible, it has still not been easy.

“When they said affordable, I thought they really meant affordable,” she said.




MusicMan

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Re: Mayo Clinic to exit Waycross
« Reply #8 on: November 22, 2015, 09:20:04 AM »
Health insurance companies are ALWAYS going to be profitable. That is the single most important fact everyone in the USA must remember.

The need for Health Insurance companies to make a profit "Trumps" customers right to affordable health insurance.

We are the only country (among our peers) that has a a for profit healthcare system. Has anyone noticed the Canadians and English are

extremely satisfied with their health care systems?

Just ask one of them.


The_Choose_1

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Re: Mayo Clinic to exit Waycross
« Reply #9 on: November 22, 2015, 09:48:17 AM »
Health insurance companies are ALWAYS going to be profitable. That is the single most important fact everyone in the USA must remember.

The need for Health Insurance companies to make a profit "Trumps" customers right to affordable health insurance.

We are the only country (among our peers) that has a a for profit healthcare system. Has anyone noticed the Canadians and English are

extremely satisfied with their health care systems?

Just ask one of them.
Then Hospitals should be forced to drop their Non-profit attitude they have. 
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spuwho

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Re: Mayo Clinic to exit Waycross
« Reply #10 on: November 22, 2015, 10:28:01 AM »
Not all hospitals are NFP's.

Memorial and Orange Park are owned by HCA, a public company.

Mayo, Baptist and UF Health are non for profits.

Most hospitals nationally are non for profit. There are some NFP insurance, generally known as "health cooperatives" they are to health insurance what credit unions are to publicly traded banks.

The point on Canadian and English health care standards are well taken, but a recent example tells you that by having a govt.  entity (a health board) decide what they will or wont do  is somewhat contrary to our current healthcare culture.

A pharma's new med was recently rejected by the UK Health Board as "too expensive" and was not allowed to be served. The pharma, who spent millions developing the drug, wouldnt be able to get their money back before generics could take their place.

The drug is sold in the US and some premium insurance providers will cover it, but many wont because its just too expensive.

It really comes down to is every life worth all costs to be saved?

UK and Canada health boards make rules on exactly what that worth is deemed. In the US it comes down to what you or your insurance is willing to support.

Some NFP hospitals are criticized for being lazy and not watching their costs close enough. There is a constant business tension between them and insurance companies to get reimbursement rates inline with their expenses.

The overall health care economy in the US is unique, but its current form has created incredible advances in medical technology.

MusicMan

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Re: Mayo Clinic to exit Waycross
« Reply #11 on: November 22, 2015, 10:53:36 AM »
Not sure how many MJ bloggers are like me, but the largest monthly check I write (I'm self employed) is my health insurance premium.

Its more than my mortgage ( I do have a great mortgage , $800).  But I write a check for $1025 every month to Florida Blue (family of 4).

When I called them and said I wanted a much higher deductible (from $3000 to $10,000) in order to cut my premium in half, they said

"NO."

That was not allowed.  IF GIVEN A CHOICE (and I am not), then I would gladly pay $500 monthly with a $10,000 deductible, pocket the

other $6,000 and pay for my actual health care out of pocket.  WHAT I NEED IS "CATASTROPHIC COVERAGE" WITH A $10,000 

DEDUCTIBLE and a monthly premium of $500.

I just can't get it.


I guess one of the points I'm trying to make is: my mortgage is a fixed amount I can budget for the next 20 years. Cannot even begin to imagine what my health insurance premiums will be in 20 years. Not even 5 years to be honest. Florida Blue can go up several points per year and there is not much I can do about it.
« Last Edit: November 22, 2015, 11:09:30 AM by MusicMan »