Author Topic: New Downtown Living: Broadstone River House Apartments  (Read 44414 times)

jaxjags

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Re: New Downtown Living: Broadstone River House Apartments
« Reply #105 on: April 05, 2019, 11:06:30 AM »
I think the housing slow down might be more sever than is being reported.  Even here in my new subdivision since March 1st construction has almost reached a stand-still.  We went a good 3 weeks without a single contractor on-site.  Lennar moved 45 homes (including ours) from a March closing to a Feb 28th closing.  Our mortgage got sold to another lender before I made the first payment.


Actually I believe that is just a sign of a lack of sub contractors in the Jacksonville area. I live in North Jax. Three new subdivisions were begun last fall on Yellowbluff Rd. It took over 6 months just to get the models built after site work was complete. I believe demand is just outstripping construction labor supply.

Kerry

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Re: New Downtown Living: Broadstone River House Apartments
« Reply #106 on: April 05, 2019, 11:16:32 AM »
I think the housing slow down might be more sever than is being reported.  Even here in my new subdivision since March 1st construction has almost reached a stand-still.  We went a good 3 weeks without a single contractor on-site.  Lennar moved 45 homes (including ours) from a March closing to a Feb 28th closing.  Our mortgage got sold to another lender before I made the first payment.


Actually I believe that is just a sign of a lack of sub contractors in the Jacksonville area. I live in North Jax. Three new subdivisions were begun last fall on Yellowbluff Rd. It took over 6 months just to get the models built after site work was complete. I believe demand is just outstripping construction labor supply.

That is an issue also.  Before moving from 220 I talked with several of the guys working on 200 Riverside.  All were from out of town (Miami and Orlando mostly).  That can't be cheap considering there are ample contruction jobs in those two places.
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acme54321

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Re: New Downtown Living: Broadstone River House Apartments
« Reply #107 on: April 05, 2019, 01:10:06 PM »
Quote
Our mortgage got sold to another lender before I made the first payment.
That would only be unusual if it DIDN'T happen.

Lol, Right??

acme54321

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Re: New Downtown Living: Broadstone River House Apartments
« Reply #108 on: April 05, 2019, 01:11:28 PM »
I think the housing slow down might be more sever than is being reported.  Even here in my new subdivision since March 1st construction has almost reached a stand-still.  We went a good 3 weeks without a single contractor on-site.  Lennar moved 45 homes (including ours) from a March closing to a Feb 28th closing.  Our mortgage got sold to another lender before I made the first payment.

All of the bitching and moaning you do about walkability, urbanism, etc and you move from 220 into something being build by Lennar?  LOL

Kerry

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Re: New Downtown Living: Broadstone River House Apartments
« Reply #109 on: April 05, 2019, 03:40:26 PM »
I think the housing slow down might be more sever than is being reported.  Even here in my new subdivision since March 1st construction has almost reached a stand-still.  We went a good 3 weeks without a single contractor on-site.  Lennar moved 45 homes (including ours) from a March closing to a Feb 28th closing.  Our mortgage got sold to another lender before I made the first payment.

All of the bitching and moaning you do about walkability, urbanism, etc and you move from 220 into something being build by Lennar?  LOL

Yea, I hear you but Jax is 99% urban sprawl.  What other options are there?  Downtown Jax will never have decent walkable urbanism in my lifetime.  Call it a surrender if you like - that's what I did and it helps me sleep at night.  If it was up to me I would head out of town and never look back.

Places like Chattanooga have a 30 year head-start on Jacksonville.

The Tennessee Aquarium opened in 1992, the Chattanooga Visitors Center in 1993, the Creative Discovery Museum in 1995, the IMAX 3D Theater in 1996.

Any of those things even being discussed in Jax by anyone with the power to make it happen?  Nope.
« Last Edit: April 05, 2019, 03:46:32 PM by Kerry »
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thelakelander

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Re: New Downtown Living: Broadstone River House Apartments
« Reply #110 on: April 05, 2019, 04:04:54 PM »
The key thing with Jax is that turning things around for the Northbank would not take much time since Jax isn't starting from scratch and there's some adaptive reuse projects already underway at key locations. The important thing is to have a redevelopment strategy that rapidly addresses a few key gaps, sites and buildings within the Northbank. This would include RFPing key city owned buildings and properties, hamming out deals with existing building owners to revamp properties at street level, making the streetscape multimodal friendly and nailing it right with the Landing site. This is pretty critical for the few corridors with potential continuous blocks of street level retail like Laura and Adams. If you nail the Landing and Hemming correctly and funnel more of that Hart Bridge demo traffic down a single corridor through the CBD, you'll naturally stimulate some things that work with the market. We're already spending the money, so capital isn't the issue right now. Do things right with tried and true, time-tested successful principles and the place will look dramatically different in five years. Keep up doing the same old stuff and we'll still be having this discussion in 2029.
« Last Edit: April 05, 2019, 04:10:52 PM by thelakelander »
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Tacachale

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Re: New Downtown Living: Broadstone River House Apartments
« Reply #111 on: April 05, 2019, 04:25:17 PM »
I think the housing slow down might be more sever than is being reported.  Even here in my new subdivision since March 1st construction has almost reached a stand-still.  We went a good 3 weeks without a single contractor on-site.  Lennar moved 45 homes (including ours) from a March closing to a Feb 28th closing.  Our mortgage got sold to another lender before I made the first payment.

All of the bitching and moaning you do about walkability, urbanism, etc and you move from 220 into something being build by Lennar?  LOL

Yea, I hear you but Jax is 99% urban sprawl.  What other options are there?

Riverside, Avondale, San Marco, Murray Hill, Springfield, Fairfax, St. Nicholas, increasingly Lake Shore.
Do you believe that when the blue jay or another bird sings and the body is trembling, that is a signal that people are coming or something important is about to happen?

Tacachale

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Re: New Downtown Living: Broadstone River House Apartments
« Reply #112 on: April 05, 2019, 04:27:48 PM »
The key thing with Jax is that turning things around for the Northbank would not take much time since Jax isn't starting from scratch and there's some adaptive reuse projects already underway at key locations. The important thing is to have a redevelopment strategy that rapidly addresses a few key gaps, sites and buildings within the Northbank. This would include RFPing key city owned buildings and properties, hamming out deals with existing building owners to revamp properties at street level, making the streetscape multimodal friendly and nailing it right with the Landing site. This is pretty critical for the few corridors with potential continuous blocks of street level retail like Laura and Adams. If you nail the Landing and Hemming correctly and funnel more of that Hart Bridge demo traffic down a single corridor through the CBD, you'll naturally stimulate some things that work with the market. We're already spending the money, so capital isn't the issue right now. Do things right with tried and true, time-tested successful principles and the place will look dramatically different in five years. Keep up doing the same old stuff and we'll still be having this discussion in 2029.

True. Though it'll take a while for DT, especially the Northbank core, to have a lot of residential space available. That would take fairly big reno projects or new construction.
Do you believe that when the blue jay or another bird sings and the body is trembling, that is a signal that people are coming or something important is about to happen?

thelakelander

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Re: New Downtown Living: Broadstone River House Apartments
« Reply #113 on: April 05, 2019, 05:02:38 PM »
Residential is needed but honestly, it will take decades for DT to have a population base to self support an urban retail and dining district. You speed things up with clustering complementing uses that attract outside spending power....hotels, cultural/entertainment venues, programming of special events, forcing exposure to through traffic (auto and transit), etc. Do that and you'll get yourself a "WPB Clematis" or "Greenville Main" that your unborn grandkids won't have to push you in your wheelchair to enjoy.
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Tacachale

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Re: New Downtown Living: Broadstone River House Apartments
« Reply #114 on: April 05, 2019, 05:17:53 PM »
Residential is needed but honestly, it will take decades for DT to have a population base to self support an urban retail and dining district. You speed things up with clustering complementing uses that attract outside spending power....hotels, cultural/entertainment venues, programming of special events, forcing exposure to through traffic (auto and transit), etc. Do that and you'll get yourself a "WPB Clematis" or "Greenville Main" that your unborn grandkids won't have to push you in your wheelchair to enjoy.

You're right, but Kerry was talking about a place to move into. For the foreseeable future anyway, if you're not in one of the couple thousand units that stay over 90% full, you're SOL. Or, you move to one of the other neighborhoods I listed.
Do you believe that when the blue jay or another bird sings and the body is trembling, that is a signal that people are coming or something important is about to happen?

thelakelander

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Re: New Downtown Living: Broadstone River House Apartments
« Reply #115 on: April 05, 2019, 05:41:58 PM »
That's true.
"A man who views the world the same at 50 as he did at 20 has wasted 30 years of his life.” - Muhammad Ali

Kerry

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Re: New Downtown Living: Broadstone River House Apartments
« Reply #116 on: April 05, 2019, 06:08:16 PM »
I think the housing slow down might be more sever than is being reported.  Even here in my new subdivision since March 1st construction has almost reached a stand-still.  We went a good 3 weeks without a single contractor on-site.  Lennar moved 45 homes (including ours) from a March closing to a Feb 28th closing.  Our mortgage got sold to another lender before I made the first payment.

All of the bitching and moaning you do about walkability, urbanism, etc and you move from 220 into something being build by Lennar?  LOL

Yea, I hear you but Jax is 99% urban sprawl.  What other options are there?

Riverside, Avondale, San Marco, Murray Hill, Springfield, Fairfax, St. Nicholas, increasingly Lake Shore.

Looked at all those places and for the prices being asked we found every single property on the market to be substandard.
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Kiva

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Re: New Downtown Living: Broadstone River House Apartments
« Reply #117 on: April 05, 2019, 09:41:25 PM »
I think the housing slow down might be more sever than is being reported.  Even here in my new subdivision since March 1st construction has almost reached a stand-still.  We went a good 3 weeks without a single contractor on-site.  Lennar moved 45 homes (including ours) from a March closing to a Feb 28th closing.  Our mortgage got sold to another lender before I made the first payment.
Oh oh. Another recession, possibly even more major, on the horizon.
I doubt that. The last recession was caused by loose lending, and lots of people who had never before invested in real estate suddenly buying houses in the hopes of flipping them for big profits. I don't see that now.

Tacachale

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Re: New Downtown Living: Broadstone River House Apartments
« Reply #118 on: April 06, 2019, 08:41:06 AM »
I think the housing slow down might be more sever than is being reported.  Even here in my new subdivision since March 1st construction has almost reached a stand-still.  We went a good 3 weeks without a single contractor on-site.  Lennar moved 45 homes (including ours) from a March closing to a Feb 28th closing.  Our mortgage got sold to another lender before I made the first payment.

All of the bitching and moaning you do about walkability, urbanism, etc and you move from 220 into something being build by Lennar?  LOL

Yea, I hear you but Jax is 99% urban sprawl.  What other options are there?

Riverside, Avondale, San Marco, Murray Hill, Springfield, Fairfax, St. Nicholas, increasingly Lake Shore.

Looked at all those places and for the prices being asked we found every single property on the market to be substandard.

To each their own, I guess, but I’m sure there were properties available that cost less than what you were paying in 220.
Do you believe that when the blue jay or another bird sings and the body is trembling, that is a signal that people are coming or something important is about to happen?

Kerry

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Re: New Downtown Living: Broadstone River House Apartments
« Reply #119 on: April 06, 2019, 08:59:16 AM »
I think the housing slow down might be more sever than is being reported.  Even here in my new subdivision since March 1st construction has almost reached a stand-still.  We went a good 3 weeks without a single contractor on-site.  Lennar moved 45 homes (including ours) from a March closing to a Feb 28th closing.  Our mortgage got sold to another lender before I made the first payment.

All of the bitching and moaning you do about walkability, urbanism, etc and you move from 220 into something being build by Lennar?  LOL

Yea, I hear you but Jax is 99% urban sprawl.  What other options are there?

Riverside, Avondale, San Marco, Murray Hill, Springfield, Fairfax, St. Nicholas, increasingly Lake Shore.

Looked at all those places and for the prices being asked we found every single property on the market to be substandard.

To each their own, I guess, but I’m sure there were properties available that cost less than what you were paying in 220.

Trust me, if we could have found anything we liked we would still be living in or near the urban core.  It is a shame that Jax doesn't have more urban housing options.  Moving to suburbia is like a prison.
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