Author Topic: The Evolution of American music tastes  (Read 2269 times)

spuwho

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The Evolution of American music tastes
« on: February 07, 2015, 11:42:25 PM »
Per Business Insider and Vocativ:

Here’s how America’s taste in music has evolved over the past 50 years

Looking at the performances lined up for the Grammy’s this Sunday, some familiar names crop up: Beyoncé, Lady Gaga, Rihanna, Chris Martin, Sia, Beck. Each is a distinct artist in their own right, but they reside relatively close to each other on the spectrum of pop, rock and R&B.

Has the U.S.’s taste in popular music changed over time? We tracked every song that has ever charted on Billboard’s annual Hot 100 since the list’s inception in 1965 to measure the public appetite for various genres through the years.

While not always surprising—both rock and pop have performed pretty consistently—there are some interesting patterns. For example, country was riding high in the 1960s and 1970s but took a nosedive in the mid-’80s, before experiencing a renaissance in the early 1990s.

R&B has also been a solid performer, but it may have peaked in the mid-’90s. 1993 was also the year that hip-hop entered the mainstream in a big way. Dance seemed to profit from the death of disco, but really came into its own in 1990. Soul and folk had been on a slow, shared decline but the latter has had a reprieve in recent years thanks to the popularity of acts like The Lumineers.

Here, then, is the ever-changing landscape of music in the US:



JaxJersey-licious

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Re: The Evolution of American music tastes
« Reply #1 on: February 08, 2015, 05:32:23 AM »
What really bothers me about articles like this besides the obvious fact that what musical styles are popular will vary and go through random cycles of popularity is how they try to pigeon-hole popular songs to a certain "category". Categories which many times overlap given that many songs that become popular can have several different musical characteristics.

I don't even want to think what the poor souls compiling these stats have to go through trying to slot every popular songs into their designated lane of music style. Finding a single genre for a tune like the remix of the Florida-Georgia Line song "Cruise" must have gave those list creators aneurysms.

spuwho

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Re: The Evolution of American music tastes
« Reply #2 on: February 08, 2015, 10:11:31 AM »
Classifying certain forms of popular music has always been troublesome.  Like when the Grammy 's introduced an award for Alternative Music in response to Nirvana, Soundgarden, etc.

But who won the first award? Jethro Tull. Jetho Tull?

Not only did it show how old the Grammy voters were, it showed just how out of touch the Academy was as a whole.

As a running joke, do you know why its called a Grammy? It was named after the Gramophone. If they had named it after a phonograph, it would have been called a Phoney!!

JaxJersey-licious

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Re: The Evolution of American music tastes
« Reply #3 on: February 08, 2015, 02:53:19 PM »
Classifying certain forms of popular music has always been troublesome.  Like when the Grammy 's introduced an award for Alternative Music in response to Nirvana, Soundgarden, etc.

But who won the first award? Jethro Tull. Jetho Tull?

Yeah, that was actually that new Best Heavy Metal category they introduced back in the day. But if you really looking at the Grammy's as your guide to the best of Heavy Metal, well good luck with that.

As a running joke, do you know why its called a Grammy? It was named after the Gramophone. If they had named it after a phonograph, it would have been called a Phoney!!


The inability of Grammy voters to get a firm pulse on modern music trends makes them the least legitimate of all the big E.G.O.T. awards. To be fair, they've gotten better with their selections in recent years (or have much less to work with), but even the awarding/redaction of Milli Vannilli's award back in the day doesn't irk me as much as some of these clueless whiffs:

1977 Best New Artisist Winner: Starland Vocal Band (ft. Ron Burgundy!)
(notable nominee that year: Boston)
1978 BNA Winner: Debbie Boone (ok)
(notable nominee that year:  Foreigner)
1979 BNA winner: (oh who the f#@! cares?)
(notable nominee that year: Elvis Costello)
1980 BNA winner: Ricky Lee Jones (how'd that work out for you?)
(notable nominee that year: Dire Straits)