Author Topic: Bring Home The USS Adams To Downtown Jacksonville  (Read 50204 times)

KenFSU

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Re: Bring Home The USS Adams To Downtown Jacksonville
« Reply #180 on: June 30, 2019, 01:37:47 PM »
^Population and tourism differences for the two markets aside, that's 20k per year.

Estimates for the USS Adams were up to ten times higher - 200k a year.

Yikes.

blizz01

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Re: Bring Home The USS Adams To Downtown Jacksonville
« Reply #181 on: June 30, 2019, 04:16:58 PM »
I think a lot of it is really the appeal of the boat. Not to diminish the service but these smaller vessels seem to lack wow factor.  The Yorktown (carrier) in Charleston, the Alabama (carrier) in Mobile, or even the North Carolina (battleship) in Wilmington all have more "substance" and significance - and are supported with seemingly more infrastructure / entertainment.
« Last Edit: June 30, 2019, 10:34:06 PM by blizz01 »

thelakelander

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Re: Bring Home The USS Adams To Downtown Jacksonville
« Reply #182 on: June 30, 2019, 06:14:30 PM »
I think a combination of appeal of the boat, too many similar attractions across the country and the vibrancy of the surrounding district all play a role. Neither Jax, Orange or Lake Charles have downtowns that are considered to be tourism draws. On the other hand, Charleston does and Patriot's Point (The Yorktown) is popular. Nevertheless, it still has a financial problem. The bigger the boat, the larger the maintenance expense.

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A Charleston-based engineering company estimates it will take about $40.5 million to repair parts of the USS Yorktown’s decaying steel hull.

The aircraft carrier, which has been sitting in the Charleston Harbor’s salt water for more than 40 years, has lost an estimated 5% of its steel thickness as a whole, according to Jonathan Sigman, a senior project manager with Collins Engineers Inc. The company was paid about $500,000 to spend eight months analyzing the interior and exterior structure of the warship at Patriots Point.

Over time, the salt water has corroded the steel, causing rust and flooding in parts of the lower decks. The hull’s average section loss — or loss of thickness as determined by ultrasonic testing — is about 3.7%, which Sigman considers to be low for the age of the Yorktown.

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Midway through the fiscal year, on Dec. 31, Patriots Point had nearly $5.7 million in cash and cash equivalents, according to Lin Bennett, chair of the development authority’s Finance and Personnel Committee. Cash in the capital reserve account totaled slightly less than $5 million at that time.

She said cash from operating activities and interest income increased about $692,000 during the first half of fiscal 2014, which ran from July through December. Total operating revenue during that period was $5.1 million, and expenditures totaled $4.9 million. The maritime museum’s income before depreciation and interest was roughly $208,000.

Patriots Point’s four main revenue streams — admissions, gift shop sales, overnight camping and parking — were all up during the first half of the fiscal year when compared to the same time period in 2013.

Admission revenue totaled $2.3 million, an increase of $262,000; gift shop revenue was up $28,000, to $859,000. Revenue from overnight camping totaled about $513,000, a $73,000 increase from the previous year; and parking revenue went up nearly $6,000, to $303,985, according to Bennett.

Approximately 130,000 people paid to enter Patriots Point between July and December, which is up 5,600 from the same time period in 2013. The number of campers climbed 920 to 6,702 in 2014.

“Our goal for the year is to be up by 10,000 over last year,” Burdette said of paid attendance. Patriots Point’s goal is to have 300,000 paid visitors by the end of 2018.

https://scbiznews.com/news/agriculture/50193/


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Kerry

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Re: Bring Home The USS Adams To Downtown Jacksonville
« Reply #183 on: July 01, 2019, 08:44:01 AM »
If Jax is going to do this we need to do it right.  The USS Orleck is at best a 3rd or 4th 'other ship' at a museum, not the main attraction.  If we can't get a carrier or battleship then it isn't worth it.  The USS Orleck would be more at home in St. Augustine or Fernandina.  It would look tiny in downtown Jax.

One of the main issues with Patriots Point is its location across the river from Charleston.  A lot of people who visit Charleston don't have a car so getting there is a challenge, and the people who do have a car don't want to give up their parking space once they have it.  It is accessible by water taxi but you have to pay for that by the person on top of admission costs which rules out most families.
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thelakelander

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Re: Bring Home The USS Adams To Downtown Jacksonville
« Reply #184 on: July 01, 2019, 09:47:16 AM »
Uber or Lyft?
"A man who views the world the same at 50 as he did at 20 has wasted 30 years of his life.” - Muhammad Ali

Charles Hunter

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Re: Bring Home The USS Adams To Downtown Jacksonville
« Reply #185 on: July 01, 2019, 11:05:54 AM »
Good luck getting a carrier or battleship downtown, with the vertical clearance issues - both above and below the waterline.

Kerry

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Re: Bring Home The USS Adams To Downtown Jacksonville
« Reply #186 on: July 02, 2019, 08:48:07 AM »
Good luck getting a carrier or battleship downtown, with the vertical clearance issues - both above and below the waterline.

Good point.  A battleship is a little over 200' tall so Mathew's Bridge rules it out downtown.
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Charles Hunter

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Re: Bring Home The USS Adams To Downtown Jacksonville
« Reply #187 on: July 02, 2019, 12:11:45 PM »
Good luck getting a carrier or battleship downtown, with the vertical clearance issues - both above and below the waterline.

Good point.  A battleship is a little over 200' tall so Mathew's Bridge rules it out downtown.

And, with 175' clearance, nothing west of the Dames Point Bridge is possible.

KenFSU

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Re: Bring Home The USS Adams To Downtown Jacksonville
« Reply #188 on: July 02, 2019, 02:30:48 PM »
Town Center?

 :o

Kerry

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Re: Bring Home The USS Adams To Downtown Jacksonville
« Reply #189 on: July 03, 2019, 06:46:31 AM »
Of course, it could always be partially dismantled and then reassembled on-site.  The conning tower could be partially removed and placed on the deck and towed into place.  It isn't like it actually has to be functional again.
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Kerry

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Re: Bring Home The USS Adams To Downtown Jacksonville
« Reply #190 on: July 03, 2019, 08:09:47 AM »
Just came across this story today.  It appears maintenance costs is a common problem.

https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/us/naval-warships-faced-with-steep-maintenance-costs-fight-to-survive/ar-AADL0AV
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Peter Griffin

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Re: Bring Home The USS Adams To Downtown Jacksonville
« Reply #191 on: July 03, 2019, 08:56:41 AM »
I know I'm like 13 pages into this thread, but I just don't see any appeal for this type of thing to be implemented in DT Jax. I can't see it drawing substantial crowds unless it had the type of infrastructure that the Charleston ship has, which isn't really possible here given the footprint near the stadium.

Plus, would something like this bring in any tourists or suburbanites? I don't see it happening.

Snaketoz

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Re: Bring Home The USS Adams To Downtown Jacksonville
« Reply #192 on: July 03, 2019, 09:09:58 AM »
I agree that the ship downtown is not a good idea.  It may bring a few people downtown to see it, but what type of visitor does it bring?  We need attractions that bring people who will stay awhile and spend money.  A destination attraction.  It's only a short distance to drive on to Orlando and find some really popular sights and things to do.  We need places that appeal to the locals.  How is a maintenance-heavy rust bucket solve that?  We'd be better off with the world's largest ball of twine or an annual mullet pageant.

Charles Hunter

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Re: Bring Home The USS Adams To Downtown Jacksonville
« Reply #193 on: July 03, 2019, 10:18:33 AM »

< snip >

  We'd be better off with the world's largest ball of twine or an annual mullet pageant.

The fish or the hairstyle?

itsfantastic1

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Re: Bring Home The USS Adams To Downtown Jacksonville
« Reply #194 on: July 03, 2019, 10:40:51 AM »

< snip >

  We'd be better off with the world's largest ball of twine or an annual mullet pageant.

The fish or the hairstyle?

Yes