Author Topic: Lost Jacksonville: The Row  (Read 20023 times)

Cliffs_Daughter

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 484
  • Don't make me come down there and smack someone.
Re: Lost Jacksonville: The Row
« Reply #15 on: May 06, 2014, 03:03:47 PM »
Has anybody had to opportunity to stay at that bed and breakfast on Riverside?

Going back to topic here... I photographed a friend's wedding there, and we dined and danced there all night. Not exactly an overnight stay, but impressionable nonetheless.
Interesting, what is now the tea room used to be their restaurant named, what else... "The Row"
Heather  @Tiki_Proxima

Ignorantia legis non excusat.

BoldBoyOfTheSouth

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 373
Re: Lost Jacksonville: The Row
« Reply #16 on: May 06, 2014, 03:32:37 PM »
People often think that cities just become the way they are because they were meant to be that way.

This is not so.  There were many reasons why New York Jews chose Jacksonville to film movies during the winter. They could have filmed anywhere there was a temperment climate but why was Jacksonville chosen? 

California offered more stable weather and moutain and desert and ocean backdrops. 

While many people in LA hated movie people and never even received top billing, they did find tolerance just outside of what was then the city in a dusty ranch area called Hollywood and Beverly Hills.

Jacksonville hated movie people.  Upptiy blacks filming out in Arlington. Jews who seemed too, well, add every early 20th century Jewish sterotype.  They made it clear that the lifestyles of movie people were not welcomed in these parts. 

Perhaps if Jacksonville encouraged the studios instead of being either indifferent or outright rude to them, maybe our movie studios could have gone from early silent films to major motion pictures during the 1920s & 30s.

As for south Florida, please honey, in 1916 hardly anybody went to south Florida.  Miami was mostly a sandy swamp and even the Atlantic ridge was not much of anything. Palm Beach was still just being planted, it would not take on  it's true glory until the 1920s and even then it was just a few hotels and some new winter cottages.  Key West was going from it's 19th century glory as a wealthy wrecking town into a slow paced cigar rolling backwater. Key West would not really become a big artist and writers' haven until the late 1920s and 30s.

As with a lot of your posts, there are kernels of truth here, but you're overgeneralizing to the point that your major claims are largely wrong.

In the early 20th century the main center of the film industry was still in New York. Naturally, this made winter filming unpleasant. New York studios did indeed set up shop in various areas with temperate climates, including not only Jacksonville but Arizona, Cuba, and (eventually) California. Jacksonville had a number of things that made it stand out (eg, an initially welcoming business climate and many different environments for on-location shooting) but the real reason it became the winter film capital was because it was the closest to New York.

There were also a number of reasons the film industry declined in Jacksonville in the late teens. It is true that one of them was backlash from traditionalist folks who didn't like what the industry represented - or at least who resented film's growing political influence. However, there was also a progressive fashion that actively supported the industry. The election of John W. Martin over film supporter JET Bowden came out of this tension. However, the most substantial factor in the decline of Jacksonville's winter film industry was the rise of Hollywood as a feasible location for both winter and summer shooting. This led to the decline of the New York studios, and in turn there was less and less demand for winter filming in Jacksonville.

So, it's not really true that "Jacksonville hated movie people". Some elements surely hated "movie people" but there were others who really liked "movie people", but who faced an uphill battle against factors they largely couldn't influence.
[/quot

Winter movie capital, not THE MOVIE CAPITAL


The people who consorted with movie people were not respectable society people in those days.

An actress was just one step up from a prostitute or bar maid in those days, often they were the same. 

thelakelander

  • The Jaxson
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 31610
    • Modern Cities
Re: Lost Jacksonville: The Row
« Reply #17 on: May 06, 2014, 03:36:00 PM »
So what were the boundaries of said row? Was a literal row, only on Riverside Ave, or were there similar structures in surrounding streets that have been lost as well?

Riverside Avenue, roughly from Edison Street to Memorial Park/Margaret Street.
"A man who views the world the same at 50 as he did at 20 has wasted 30 years of his life.” - Muhammad Ali

BoldBoyOfTheSouth

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 373
Re: Lost Jacksonville: The Row
« Reply #18 on: May 06, 2014, 03:41:37 PM »
Avondale had restrictive covenants when it was developed in the 1920s and Florida was a very segregated state.

While there were wealthy African American insurance company and bank owners here, there were in most southern states.

Jacksonville was not a racially enlightened place where blacks and whites mixed.

Sure, you can find a racially mixed speakeasy Jazz club where blacks played and maybe a famous African American may have entered as a paying customer, but that was not the norm. Of course there were places that started out catering to solely black customers where white people would go for a good time but that was never something you talked about at the dinner table or to your mama.

A film studio (wasn't it white owned) produced films with African Anericans but it was way out in the then boondocks of Arlington, out of sight and out of mind. 
« Last Edit: May 06, 2014, 03:50:37 PM by BoldBoyOfTheSouth »

Tacachale

  • Administrator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 7859
Re: Lost Jacksonville: The Row
« Reply #19 on: May 06, 2014, 04:43:39 PM »
Perhaps all this can be moved to another thread so as not to keep hijacking this very interesting material about the Row. To continue hijacking,
People often think that cities just become the way they are because they were meant to be that way.

This is not so.  There were many reasons why New York Jews chose Jacksonville to film movies during the winter. They could have filmed anywhere there was a temperment climate but why was Jacksonville chosen? 

California offered more stable weather and moutain and desert and ocean backdrops. 

While many people in LA hated movie people and never even received top billing, they did find tolerance just outside of what was then the city in a dusty ranch area called Hollywood and Beverly Hills.

Jacksonville hated movie people.  Upptiy blacks filming out in Arlington. Jews who seemed too, well, add every early 20th century Jewish sterotype.  They made it clear that the lifestyles of movie people were not welcomed in these parts. 

Perhaps if Jacksonville encouraged the studios instead of being either indifferent or outright rude to them, maybe our movie studios could have gone from early silent films to major motion pictures during the 1920s & 30s.

As for south Florida, please honey, in 1916 hardly anybody went to south Florida.  Miami was mostly a sandy swamp and even the Atlantic ridge was not much of anything. Palm Beach was still just being planted, it would not take on  it's true glory until the 1920s and even then it was just a few hotels and some new winter cottages.  Key West was going from it's 19th century glory as a wealthy wrecking town into a slow paced cigar rolling backwater. Key West would not really become a big artist and writers' haven until the late 1920s and 30s.

As with a lot of your posts, there are kernels of truth here, but you're overgeneralizing to the point that your major claims are largely wrong.

In the early 20th century the main center of the film industry was still in New York. Naturally, this made winter filming unpleasant. New York studios did indeed set up shop in various areas with temperate climates, including not only Jacksonville but Arizona, Cuba, and (eventually) California. Jacksonville had a number of things that made it stand out (eg, an initially welcoming business climate and many different environments for on-location shooting) but the real reason it became the winter film capital was because it was the closest to New York.

There were also a number of reasons the film industry declined in Jacksonville in the late teens. It is true that one of them was backlash from traditionalist folks who didn't like what the industry represented - or at least who resented film's growing political influence. However, there was also a progressive fashion that actively supported the industry. The election of John W. Martin over film supporter JET Bowden came out of this tension. However, the most substantial factor in the decline of Jacksonville's winter film industry was the rise of Hollywood as a feasible location for both winter and summer shooting. This led to the decline of the New York studios, and in turn there was less and less demand for winter filming in Jacksonville.

So, it's not really true that "Jacksonville hated movie people". Some elements surely hated "movie people" but there were others who really liked "movie people", but who faced an uphill battle against factors they largely couldn't influence.

Winter movie capital, not THE MOVIE CAPITAL


The people who consorted with movie people were not respectable society people in those days.

An actress was just one step up from a prostitute or bar maid in those days, often they were the same.

Yes, I said "winter movie capital". Summer filming was centered in New York and to an extent other Northeastern areas. Once Hollywood became established, there was less and less reason to be in New York or to have distinct winter studios. And "movie people" weren't any more reputable in LA or New York than they were in Jacksonville or anywhere else movies were shot.

Avondale had restrictive covenants when it was developed in the 1920s and Florida was a very segregated state.

While there were wealthy African American insurance company and bank owners here, there were in most southern states.

Jacksonville was not a racially enlightened place where blacks and whites mixed.

Sure, you can find a racially mixed speakeasy Jazz club where blacks played and maybe a famous African American may have entered as a paying customer, but that was not the norm. Of course there were places that started out catering to solely black customers where white people would go for a good time but that was never something you talked about at the dinner table or to your mama.

In comparison to most of the rest of the South at the time, Jacksonville was known as a comparatively friendly town for African-Americans in the late 19th century, much less so in the early 20th century. The decline was due to national and regional factors during the "nadir of American race relations" and it had as much to do with state interference in the city's affairs as any local factor. Jax also retained its reputation as a comparatively tolerant city for other minority groups (immigrants, Jews, Catholics, Syrians, Hispanics, Greeks, Italians, etc.) for a much longer period. Was it "racially enlightened"? By modern standards, definitely not. But by the standards of the contemporary South, a case can certainly be made that it was "less unenlightened" than the status quo.

A film studio (wasn't it white owned) produced films with African Anericans but it was way out in the then boondocks of Arlington, out of sight and out of mind. 

Norman Studios produced films for African-Americans and starring African-Americans; the Norman family is white. The studio didn't open until 1920, after most of the industry had already left town. In fact, it set up in the old Eagle Film Company facilities, which had folded in 1917. It stopped making films in 1928, when talkies became the standard, and the property was used for other things.
« Last Edit: May 06, 2014, 05:05:56 PM by Tacachale »
Do you believe that when the blue jay or another bird sings and the body is trembling, that is a signal that people are coming or something important is about to happen?

BoldBoyOfTheSouth

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 373
Re: Lost Jacksonville: The Row
« Reply #20 on: May 06, 2014, 10:29:51 PM »
"Napoleon Bonaparte Broward had been Mayor of the City of La Villa--which was mostly black and minorcan and jewish--- and the city has one of the oldest Jewish Cemetaries in the south."

REALLY?

Nothing that I've ever read about Napoleon Bonaparte Broward has ever been about him being racially inclusive.

If anything, he riled up the white trash for votes.

BoldBoyOfTheSouth

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 373
Re: Lost Jacksonville: The Row
« Reply #21 on: May 06, 2014, 10:41:32 PM »
http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00102915/00012

Apparently Broward was not as progressive as people think .
« Last Edit: May 06, 2014, 10:43:20 PM by BoldBoyOfTheSouth »

BoldBoyOfTheSouth

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 373
Re: Lost Jacksonville: The Row
« Reply #22 on: May 06, 2014, 10:58:25 PM »
"At least, so thinks the present Governor of Florida, the Hon. Napoleon Bonaparte Broward, who, realizing the disGovernor advantage under which his state suffers by reason Broward of of its numerous negro population, in his recent Message to the Florida Legislature presented for their consideration the following suggestion:
There has been no agitation, as in some other states, that the expense of running negro schools should be derived from the assessment and collection from the property of the white people. In fact, no question has arisen to cause any disturbance, yet it is apparent to even the casual observer that the relation between the two races is becoming more strained and acute. The negroes to-day have less friendship for the white people than they have ever had since the Civil War, and the white people have less tolerance and sympathy for the negro. It is my opinion that the two races will not, for any great length of time, occupy the same territory without friction and outbreaks of disorder between the two.
I doubt if education can possibly tend to the happiness of any race so long as it only aids in a keener discernment of the hopeless differences existing between that race and a dominant race in the same country and in the same neighborhood. The educated negro can look back with no pride upon the past history of his race, nor can he look forward to a time when his race can hope to control the politics of the country or regulate society.
1 deem it best and, therefore, recommend a resolution memorializing the Congress of the United States to purchase territory, either domestic or foreign, and provide means to purchase the property of the negroes, at reasonable prices, and to transport the negroes to the territory purchased by the United States. The United States to organize a government for them of the negro race; to protect them from foreign invasion; to prevent white people from living among them in the territory, and to prevent negroes from migrating back to the United States. I believe this to be the only hope of a solution of the race problem between the white and black races, as I can see no ultimate good results that can accrue from the education of a race, without planting in their being the hope of attaining the highest position in government affairs and society. In fact, I can see no reason to expect that any man can be made happy by whetting his intelligence to that point where he can better contemplate or realize the hopeless gulf that must ever separate him and his race from the best things that the dominant race (who employ him as a servant) have in store for themselves. I believe that any person so situated would grow miserable, in proportion as he increased in intelligence. I believe that we should consider the fact that the negroes are the wards of the white people, and that it is our duty to make whatever provision for them would be best for their well-being; and it is my opinion that the above recommendation, that they be given a home of their own, where they can hope by living proper lives, to occupy the highest places in it, thus educating and civilizing them, may tend toward their happiness and good. More especially do I make this recommendation for the good of the white race; to keep sweet the lives of the white people; to keep their consciences keen and clean. It is absolutely necessary to the civilization and Christianization of the world by them. Our children must be able to read the history of our lives and see that it contains accounts of the best lived lives, and that their ancestors were the best people of the earth. Whatever tends to sour our natures, or that causes us to give way to passion or temper, tends to destroy us, and no cost should be considered in a matter so fraught with danger to the attainment of the civilization and Christianization of the world as will the attempt to compel these two races to live in the same territory.
These sentiments of Governor Broward present the practical views of the most advanced Southern thought upon the situation, and certainly if legislative action of the character suggested by the Governor were taken by Florida and followed by similar requests on the part of other Southern States, the negro problem would be in a fair way to early solution, could the co-operation of the North be secured to carry out his plan."

---- I guess this was progressive thinking for its day .

http://books.google.com/books?id=gShCAAAAIAAJ&pg=PA458&lpg=PA458&dq=napoleon+bonaparte+broward+race+relations&source=bl&ots=v2j9xA2RqO&sig=uxfvZYIGHEpz3G8JcJEpsjhNLfk&hl=en&sa=X&ei=BZ5pU_rJHM-yyAST1IHgBQ&ved=0CCoQ6AEwBDgK

BoldBoyOfTheSouth

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 373
Re: Lost Jacksonville: The Row
« Reply #23 on: May 06, 2014, 11:18:52 PM »
It's ok if you want to believe that Broward was some sort of progressive in the modern sense. 

Just like comparing a few blocks in Riverside being equal to the great cities of the south.  Sure, there are comparisons but just about every prosperous city had an exclusive street where the elite lived.  If the street was still architecturally intact and a protected historical district by the National Trust For Historic Preservation then we could show it off with pride .  Or let it rot like we do with Springfield.  It's what the people value.

MetroJacksonville romanizes many things which in some cases was unique to Jax but most others were just as common place in cities in the south, north, west and even Camada.



I understand completely and love that you try to instill a pride of place. Though, to be honest, most prosperous cities had pretty much the same things we've had.

Interracial brothers in palatial homes may have been more prominent in JAX than elsewhere, must just about every major city had madams catering to just about every kinky sexual fantasy .  JAX was a port and railroad city that also catered to tourists, did we have more than the average city? Perhaps we did.


So it's alright if you overly romanticize while whitewashing the past, everybody does it.  Frankly, it's part of MetroJacksonville's charm.

BoldBoyOfTheSouth

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 373
Re: Lost Jacksonville: The Row
« Reply #24 on: May 06, 2014, 11:58:37 PM »
You become adorable when you get riled up.  It's kind of cute actually.

It also shows that you have a passion and love for our city, if only we had more like you.

For the record, you were the one that brought up Broward and made a sweeping generalization equating his name with a tolerant city, or at least more tolerant than say, most of Florida which is believed to of had more lynchings than any other southern state.

But you understand that we must judge people not by our modern day values but judge within the context of their era. You see the good in NBB even though history and our modern values of right and wrong shows Broward to be a racist and tipped Florida into ecological disasters by attempting to drain the Everglades.  During his era, draining the Everglades was a good thing and rants about African Americans and basically segregation by moving them away from whites was considered a forward thinking virtue but then who would do all the work?

NBB could not of been all bad.  He did try to educate poor Floridians which was most than his immediate predecessors did.  Big cities like JAX controlled the statehouse, he wanted poor yeomen farmers in the rural parts of the state to vote and be educated.  His was no fan of Henry Flagler and his railroads neither.  While he did not stop them from buying and controlling Tallahassee, he did certainly give them a run for their money.

Healthy debate from differing viewpoints is what we need more of.   


« Last Edit: May 07, 2014, 12:00:56 AM by BoldBoyOfTheSouth »

BoldBoyOfTheSouth

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 373
Re: Lost Jacksonville: The Row
« Reply #25 on: May 07, 2014, 12:10:57 AM »
Totally agree that our country very quickly tuned into am outright vicious place racially during this era.

Though, in just one generation we went from "Segregation now and segregation forever " to having the first African American President.

It can go both ways in a very short period of time.

History is repeating itself.  Prior to the 1970s oil crisis, most Americans did not have any real animosity toward people from the Middle East.  Then by 2005, an uncomfortable percentage of Americans had a deep fears of men getting on a plane if they looked vaguely Islamist.   

AuditoreEnterprise

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 404
  • audentes fortuna juvat
Re: Lost Jacksonville: The Row
« Reply #26 on: May 08, 2014, 07:08:54 PM »
People often think that cities just become the way they are because they were meant to be that way.

This is not so.  There were many reasons why New York Jews chose Jacksonville to film movies during the winter. They could have filmed anywhere there was a temperment climate but why was Jacksonville chosen? 

California offered more stable weather and moutain and desert and ocean backdrops. 

While many people in LA hated movie people and never even received top billing, they did find tolerance just outside of what was then the city in a dusty ranch area called Hollywood and Beverly Hills.

Jacksonville hated movie people.  Upptiy blacks filming out in Arlington. Jews who seemed too, well, add every early 20th century Jewish sterotype.  They made it clear that the lifestyles of movie people were not welcomed in these parts. 

Perhaps if Jacksonville encouraged the studios instead of being either indifferent or outright rude to them, maybe our movie studios could have gone from early silent films to major motion pictures during the 1920s & 30s.

As for south Florida, please honey, in 1916 hardly anybody went to south Florida.  Miami was mostly a sandy swamp and even the Atlantic ridge was not much of anything. Palm Beach was still just being planted, it would not take on  it's true glory until the 1920s and even then it was just a few hotels and some new winter cottages.  Key West was going from it's 19th century glory as a wealthy wrecking town into a slow paced cigar rolling backwater. Key West would not really become a big artist and writers' haven until the late 1920s and 30s.

As with a lot of your posts, there are kernels of truth here, but you're overgeneralizing to the point that your major claims are largely wrong.

In the early 20th century the main center of the film industry was still in New York. Naturally, this made winter filming unpleasant. New York studios did indeed set up shop in various areas with temperate climates, including not only Jacksonville but Arizona, Cuba, and (eventually) California. Jacksonville had a number of things that made it stand out (eg, an initially welcoming business climate and many different environments for on-location shooting) but the real reason it became the winter film capital was because it was the closest to New York.

There were also a number of reasons the film industry declined in Jacksonville in the late teens. It is true that one of them was backlash from traditionalist folks who didn't like what the industry represented - or at least who resented film's growing political influence. However, there was also a progressive fashion that actively supported the industry. The election of John W. Martin over film supporter JET Bowden came out of this tension. However, the most substantial factor in the decline of Jacksonville's winter film industry was the rise of Hollywood as a feasible location for both winter and summer shooting. This led to the decline of the New York studios, and in turn there was less and less demand for winter filming in Jacksonville.

So, it's not really true that "Jacksonville hated movie people". Some elements surely hated "movie people" but there were others who really liked "movie people", but who faced an uphill battle against factors they largely couldn't influence.

+100 a majority of what you stated I in fact heard when taking a history of cinema class in LA a few years ago.
"Aiming to build a better community one stone at a time"

CHECK US OUT ON FACEBOOK

Ocklawaha

  • Phd. Ferroequinology
  • Global Moderator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 10438
  • Monster of Mobility! Ocklawaha is Robert Mann
    • LIGHT RAIL JACKSONVILLE
Re: Lost Jacksonville: The Row
« Reply #27 on: May 09, 2014, 05:20:27 PM »
Starting prep for yet another major surgery so I'm not as active as I'd like to be but this is FUNNY. Miami and South Florida was a backwater... REALLY?  There were just 506 votes to incorporate Miami in 1896, and that included 100 Black votes from a labor district then known as 'Colored Town', todays Overtown. In 1900, 1,681 people lived in Miami, Florida; in 1910, there were 5,471 people; and in 1920, there were 29,549 people. That backwater somehow managed to add an average of 56,247 new residents, every 5 years from 1920 until 1960.  Throughout the first 6-7 years of The Great Florida Boom, Jacksonville's Terminal was handling some 250 named trains daily, most of which were running in several sections and a few of which were running in 24 sections. Those crowds may have paused in Jacksonville, but the destination was overwhelmingly Miami and South Florida. The 1926 hurricane left between 25,000 and 50,000 Miamian's homeless. By the mid depression the South Beach was in full development and by WWII the military sprawled all across South Florida. 1965 alone over 100,000 Cuban's entered the city on 'Freedom Flights.' Sorry but Miami took off and Jacksonville never even saw them on radar again for all of the reasons given by others in this thread.

That 'Bible Thumpers' somehow held Jacksonville back while not effecting the rest of the country is trying to place your modernist perceptions into the frame of a completely different era. Frankly LA was far ahead of us as a metro area before the first studio ever left town. "The Newest Religious Sect Has Started in Los Angeles": Race, Class, Ethnicity, and the Origins of the Pentecostal Movement, 1906-1913. Both Los Angeles and San Francisco were born 'Roman Catholic', in 1900, visiting Russian dignitaries proclaimed them a hotbed of religious fanatics!

Quote
Los Angeles, following the custom which then prevailed among the Latin races, of giving religious names to places, was Nuestra Senora de Los Angeles, sometimes written Nuestra Senora la Reina de Los Angeles—"Our Lady the Queen of the Angels." FOUNDED BY MEXICANS Los Angeles was founded on September 4, 1781, by a small band of pobladores, or colonists, who had been recruited In the Mexican states of Slnaloa and Sonora, and brought hero under the command of a government officer, to found an agricultural colony, mainly for the purpose of raising produce for tho soldiers at the presidios. , The first census gave the place a 1 population of 141. The residents were a mixed class, composed of one Euro- 1 pean, seventy-two Spanish-Americans, seven Indians, twenty-two mulattoes and thirty-nine Mestizos. As recently as 1831, fifty years after the founding of the pueblo, the population was only 770. In January, 1847, the population was 1600. Los Angeles dates Its most rapid growth from November 9, 1885, when the laflt spike driven in the line of the Atlantic & Pacific railway formed a link which Joined It with the east. And what Induced the hegira to this land?, you ask. Listen. Man Is a creature who looks to comfort and health. The extremes of heat and cold of the land east of the Rockies are too well known to bear repetition. The sunny southland Is free of these features. Who can wonder that there are hundreds of thousands of persons who are aspirants for homes In a city at which the United States weather bureau states the mercury fell below 32 degrees, Fahrenheit, only six times during ten years? Summer in Southern California is not blighted by an elevated mercury, which, coupled with excessive humidity, makes life In eastern cities almost unbearable. CLIMATE NOT ONLY ASSET Someone has said that the possession of health Is more to be prized thas the accumulation of riches. Under this beneficent climate the possession of health becomes more secure, and health, which is fading away, takes new life and blooms again. Many people of the east gain the erroneous Impression that Los Angeles has climate and that alons to .speak In Its favor. The recital of a few facts may serve to correct such an Impression. Los Angeles has a present assessed property valuation of nearly $300,000,---000. In the confines of the city there are 1850 manufacturing establishments, employing $30,000,000 capital, giving work to 15,000 workers and turning out $65,000,000 worth of goods each year. Los Angeles has a harbor on which the Untied States government hns spent millions and will gradually expend millions more, the commerce of which, it is stated, will become stupendous on the completion of the Panama canal. It Is now the greatest lumber receiving port of the United States. Throughout tho country the banks of Los Angeles are noted for their solid and prosperous condition. They have deposits aggregating $125,000,000 and during 1909 the clearings amounted to $673,165,728. Los Angeles has been leading all cities of the United States in increase of bank clearings. Tho financial storms of the past twenty years have been successfully ridden out by the local banks. 350 MTI,ES OF CAR TRACK Los Angeles has perhaps the most complete network of car lines on the continent, the total mileage of electric railway tracks In the city being more than 350. A city's parka are its jewels and Los Angeles is not ■without adornment. There are a dozen parks within the corporate limits, aggregating more than 600 acres. Seven public playgrounds are In operation i« this city as well aa four vacation or summer centers. During tho past year $42,000 was expended In maintaining the play-< grounds. To look from the past to the future for a moment, the copsideration of the completion of the great aqueduct, now in the course of construction from the Owens river'to the city, a distance of 220 miles, should claim attention. Th« completion of this great project wi\l slve thje city a supply of pure water from the snow-clad sides of the highest mountain in the United States, sufficient for a population of 2,000,000. Not only can the city be supplied with drinking water for many years, but there will be enough surplus to Irrigate all the available land In the county. Not only this, but the water will furnish an immense amount of power for electric lighting and for factories.
Los Angeles Herald 11/10/1910

mtraininjax

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 5414
Re: Lost Jacksonville: The Row
« Reply #28 on: May 10, 2014, 04:00:41 AM »
Quote
Why on earth would northerners not go a little bit further south for a significantly warmer experience?

Exactly Simms! As much as Henry Flagler did for us and St. Augustine for that matter, the FEC put a nail in our coffin when it expanded to Miami. We remained a gas stop for the gas guzzler autos for years after on their way to Disneyworld. So now, we look to expand our own identity.

This week, we have a great spotlight with the TPC being played near us, yeah its still St. Johns County, but Jax gets the benefits. Just as the Row got the benefits of Jacksonville 100 years ago when the people who built the Row did so with money earned by selling timber and other commodities of a growing Jacksonville at the time.

In Dr. Woods Architectural Book of Jax, he has many pictures of homes that used to be in Brooklyn along the river, even the Florida Times Union building was built on a site that included a "Row" house, which was torn down so that the FTU could build........that. But alas, progress. We still have a few, best to love what we have now as they serve as reminders of our past.
And, that $115 will save Jacksonville from financial ruin. - Mayor John Peyton

“This is a game-changer. This is what I mean when I say taking Jacksonville to the next level.”
-Mayor Alvin Brown on new video boards at Everbank Field

thelakelander

  • The Jaxson
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 31610
    • Modern Cities
Re: Lost Jacksonville: The Row
« Reply #29 on: May 10, 2014, 08:05:16 AM »
I'm pretty sure the FTU building replaced a few warehouses and wharves. I believe Greeley's house in Brooklyn was between there and Forest Street....probably where Haskell is located today.

I still would not say the FEC put the nail in Jax's coffin. Jax was the size of what Waycross, GA is today. The reality is, Jax wasn't even Florida's largest city when the Flagler built his railroad bridge over the St. Johns (1890), connecting a railroad that already ran from South Jacksonville to St. Augustine. That honor belonged to Key West. Pensacola and Tampa also were not that far off our trail. Flagler's entry into the Florida rail business was a major reason for Jax's growth as well.

1870

6,912 - Jacksonville
5,016 - Key West
3,347 - Pensacola
796 - Tampa

1880

9,890 - Key West
7,650 - Jacksonville
6,845 - Pensacola
720 - Tampa

1890

18,080 - Key West
17,201 - Jacksonville
11,750 - Pensacola
5,532 - Tampa

1900

28,429 - Jacksonville
17,747 - Pensacola
17,114 - Key West
15,839 - Tampa
"A man who views the world the same at 50 as he did at 20 has wasted 30 years of his life.” - Muhammad Ali