Author Topic: Southern Rock  (Read 98924 times)

Adam White

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Re: Southern Rock
« Reply #345 on: May 30, 2017, 05:54:43 PM »
Well, one thing you guys might not remember is what it was like for local musicians in the 80s. If you weren't playing Southern Rock, you couldn't get any column inches in the T-U. Dan MacDonald, for example, would happily write about Skynyrd, et al (they had that reunion, more deaths, more reunions, etc) but would avoid pretty much everything else (except, strangely, Mike Shackleford).

Kind of like the way that idiot at Folio only would write articles about his friends' bands.
“If you're going to play it out of tune, then play it out of tune properly.”

Tacachale

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Re: Southern Rock
« Reply #346 on: May 30, 2017, 07:08:27 PM »
Well, one thing you guys might not remember is what it was like for local musicians in the 80s. If you weren't playing Southern Rock, you couldn't get any column inches in the T-U. Dan MacDonald, for example, would happily write about Skynyrd, et al (they had that reunion, more deaths, more reunions, etc) but would avoid pretty much everything else (except, strangely, Mike Shackleford).

Kind of like the way that idiot at Folio only would write articles about his friends' bands.

Yep, before my time. Our local publications have never been good at covering music, except when some big name is in town or locals manage to generate some national interest. Folio was decent (at that) in the past but not for years. It's worse now that the print media has become so enervated; blogging hasn't really kept up, at least locally. Tampa at least has a Creative Loafing.
Do you believe that when the blue jay or another bird sings and the body is trembling, that is a signal that people are coming or something important is about to happen?

FlaBoy

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Re: Southern Rock
« Reply #347 on: May 31, 2017, 12:29:46 AM »
Tacachale,

How would you describe the more rock-ish new country stars such as Luke Bryan, Jason Aldean, Florida-Georgia Line, Cole Swindell, Brantley Gilbert, Eric Church, A Thousand Horses, etc?

Are we sort of seeing a bit of renaissance of a more Southern Rock feel to some of these bands? Or is this strictly country?

Tacachale

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Re: Southern Rock
« Reply #348 on: May 31, 2017, 05:01:01 PM »
Tacachale,

How would you describe the more rock-ish new country stars such as Luke Bryan, Jason Aldean, Florida-Georgia Line, Cole Swindell, Brantley Gilbert, Eric Church, A Thousand Horses, etc?

Are we sort of seeing a bit of renaissance of a more Southern Rock feel to some of these bands? Or is this strictly country?

I'd say there's a wave in modern country that's strongly influenced by Southern rock. I'm not familiar with all those names, but the ones I've heard of seem solidly country (country radio, country charts, tours with other country musicians, etc) rather than rock. I've heard at least some of them described as "bro country" as they use a rock base with big guitars, downplayed fiddle and banjo licks (if they're there at all), and lyrics about partying. Unsurprisingly, that label isn't popular among the musicians themselves. Incidentally, in most of these songs, only the general rock sound and general concern for "Southerness" seems to come from Southern rock. They don't tend to have the iconic solos, blues stylings, or the same lyrical content (Skynyrd, the Allmans, and ARS et al did not sing about partying in truck beds, for instance).

There has also been a Southern rock revival of sorts since the 90s. It's far less popular and mainstream than the 70s and 80s version, but prominent enough for there to be an academic book about it. And that's besides some musicians like the Drive By Truckers and Jason Isbell mentioned earlier in the thread who keep the spirit alive.
Do you believe that when the blue jay or another bird sings and the body is trembling, that is a signal that people are coming or something important is about to happen?

sheclown

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Re: Southern Rock
« Reply #349 on: September 03, 2017, 06:35:01 PM »
from Facebook:

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Paul Axtell
3 hours ago
·
I'm sad to say my brother Dave Hlubek passed away. Please keep our family in your prayers. Don't let his music be forgotten.

I know this girl won't forget the music.  Thank you Dave.

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/filSkpJuAys?rel=0&quot; frameborder=" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/filSkpJuAys?rel=0&quot; frameborder=</a>

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Molly Hatchet was founded by guitarist Dave Hlubek in 1971. The band originated and was based in Jacksonville, Florida and shared influences and inspiration with what is perhaps the most well-known act in the Southern rock genre, Lynyrd Skynyrd. Bass player Banner Thomas and Guitarist Steve Holland joined the Molly Hatchet Band in 1974, see line up. Bruce Crump would become the drummer in 1976 and guitarist Duane Roland taking his position in the band in 1975. Hlubek was the band's vocalist prior to Danny Joe Brown's entrance in early 1976. Hlubek along with Banner Thomas [1] also wrote/ Co-Wrote and co-produced many of the band's songs. Hlubek has stated that the demise of Lynyrd Skynyrd opened the door for Molly Hatchet.[2] Members of .38 Special referred the band to manager Pat Armstrong[2] who, with partner Alan Walden, had briefly been co-manager of Lynyrd Skynyrd in 1970. Ronnie Van Zant was slated to produce Molly Hatchet's first album, having helped in writing arrangements and directing rehearsals prior to his death.[citation needed] Molly Hatchet cut their first demos in Lynyrd Skynyrd's 8-track recording studio using their equipment.[2] Other demos were cut in Jacksonville's Warehouse Studios. Warner Bros. Records expressed interest in the resulting recordings from these sessions.[citation needed] However, Molly Hatchet ended up being turned down by Warner Bros who instead picked Van Halen over Molly Hatchet. After this setback, Molly Hatchet toured the Florida roadhouse and bar circuit. About six months later, Epic Records signed the band to a recording contract and, in 1977, brought Tom Werman in as producer.

Werman, known for working with straight hard rock acts such as Cheap Trick and Ted Nugent,[3] combined boogie, blues, and hard rock making Molly Hatchet's sound different from more country-influenced acts such as The Outlaws.

The band recorded and released their first album, Molly Hatchet in 1978. Its song Dreams I'll Never See got AOR airplay. Molly Hatchet was followed by Flirtin' with Disaster in 1979, with its title song another AOR hit, as was its first track, Whiskey Man, from the album. Molly Hatchet proceeded to tour behind the records building a larger fan base. Danny Joe Brown, lead singer, left the band in 1980 because of health and other reasons, only to return three years later.[4]

« Last Edit: September 04, 2017, 06:03:08 PM by sheclown »

sheclown

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Re: Southern Rock
« Reply #350 on: September 04, 2017, 05:59:24 PM »
There's a GoFundMe account set up for his family.

https://www.gofundme.com/in-memory-of-dave-hlubek
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On Sept 2nd, 2017, the rock and especially the southern rock world suffered a devastating blow when we got the news of the passing of the iconic guitarist Dave Hlubek, Molly Hatchets leader, chief songwriter and founding member. Dave along with Bruce Crump, Banner Thomas, Danny Joe Brown, Steve Holland, and Duane Roland  burst onto the scene in 1978 with their self titled release, that immediately achieved platinum status. Later albums were also certified gold or platinum. They came onto the scene at a time when we needed them most after losing Ronnie Van Zant, Steve and Cassie Gaines and others in the Lynyrd Skynyrd plane crash in 1977. Ronnie loved Molly Hatchet and was to produce the first album. Dave Hlubek and Molly Hatchet are rock icons, southern rock royalty...legendary musicians with millions of fans around the globe, leaving us a body of work to cherish for years to come. Please help us with this campaign and for the expenses that always come at a time like this. This is the only campaign that has been approved and sanctioned by the Hlubek family. Please report any others to the family....We will miss you Dave, but we find comfort that you are back with your brothers in Rock and Roll heaven making music for the angels.  LONG LIVE MOLLY HATCHET  !!!!!  Please share this to all pages....

It is especially important to Jacksonville to help out the family -- give now for the joy his special brand of southern rock brought into your life.