Author Topic: Southern Rock  (Read 211182 times)

Ocklawaha

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Re: Southern Rock
« Reply #45 on: October 28, 2012, 07:54:46 PM »
I agree, wonder what Hugh thinks? I realize that Lobo, or Jannis might not be considered Southern Rock, but they were certainly Southern Rockers. There is something magic about the S--T-Kickin' Country-Blues-Rock fusion that came to be known as 'Southern Rock.' The shame is, if we focus solely on the groups that played those music genres, we miss out on another whole group of Rockers of no small amount of fame. Jim Morrison, for example grew up on the beach in Melbourne, and hung on the same boardwalk in Daytona that I frequented a few years later. 

 
Birth name : James Douglas Morrison
Also known as   The Lizard King, Mr. Mojo Risin' (anagram of "Jim Morrison")
Born   December 8, 1943
Melbourne, Florida, U.S.
Died   July 3, 1971 (aged 27)
Paris, France
Genres   Psychedelic rock, blues rock, acid rock, rock and roll, hard rock.

One would think a song about LOS ANGELES WOMEN wouldn't make the cut, but if you are addicted to 'ELECTRIC MUSIC' as I am, you can't deny a certain foot stomping southern boy coming through loud and clear...

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/b-wgIht3roA?version=3&amp;amp;hl=en_US" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/b-wgIht3roA?version=3&amp;amp;hl=en_US</a>



How about CCR?

Creedence Clearwater Revival, They may have been from California but they sang some of the best southern rock songs like “Born On A Bayou” and “Long As I Can See The Light”. Lyrically “Midnight Special” is one of the quintessential southern rock songs but the fact that they were from out west. Don't believe it? Try on a little 'Jambalaya' straight from the bayou's of the Sacramento/San Joaquin River delta's in CALI!

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/jrUmGakCRdE?version=3&amp;amp;hl=en_US" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/jrUmGakCRdE?version=3&amp;amp;hl=en_US</a>



For those that have buried SOUTHERN ROCK somewhere back in the 70's, hold on to your hats and listen to a band from the late 90's-present date. THE NORTH MISSISSIPPI ALLSTARS:

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/hlPGyVmFGvw?version=3&amp;amp;hl=en_US" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/hlPGyVmFGvw?version=3&amp;amp;hl=en_US</a>

Ocklawaha

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Re: Southern Rock
« Reply #46 on: October 28, 2012, 08:14:44 PM »
Seriously though some of the best guitar licks in rock come from this band like “La Grange” could be the best rock and roll guitar song ever, ranking that is like ranking your favorite toes. They make lyrics like “A Haw Haw Haw/ A Haw Haw Haw Haw” sound good.

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Ocklawaha

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Re: Southern Rock
« Reply #47 on: October 28, 2012, 08:19:27 PM »
Southern Rock has deeper roots then any other form of modern music, don't believe it? Well, ''You Ain't Nothing But A Hound Dog." How about the very first Rock mega star?

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/GR3i3H2nR-A?version=3&amp;amp;hl=en_US" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/GR3i3H2nR-A?version=3&amp;amp;hl=en_US</a>

Ocklawaha

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Re: Southern Rock
« Reply #48 on: October 28, 2012, 09:04:40 PM »
Something I'd love to see if this idea comes to fruition is a radio station that features: Jazz with dedicated shows of Southern Rock, Blues and Zydeco music. Who ever does this format will 'OWN' the Jacksonville Jazz Festival.

Zydeco/Southern Rock, ZYDECO? Yeah ZYDECO, it's a Cajun Treat, I always look forward to my trips across Louisiana because there is


C. J. Chenier's Bow Legged Woman has to be one of the very best.

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/q9S53p93wbs?version=3&amp;amp;hl=en_US" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/q9S53p93wbs?version=3&amp;amp;hl=en_US</a>

Tacachale

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Re: Southern Rock
« Reply #49 on: October 28, 2012, 09:19:44 PM »
Southern Rock has deeper roots then any other form of modern music, don't believe it? Well, ''You Ain't Nothing But A Hound Dog." How about the very first Rock mega star?

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/GR3i3H2nR-A?version=3&amp;amp;hl=en_US" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/GR3i3H2nR-A?version=3&amp;amp;hl=en_US</a>

When people refer to "Southern Rock", they're almost always talking about a particular subgenre, not just any and all rock from the South (or with Southern influence). Taken that way, again, I don't think you can go much farther back than the Allmans. And neither Southern Rock nor rock music in general have "deeper roots" than other modern styles like the blues and r&b, considering its roots are in the blues and r&b.
Do you believe that when the blue jay or another bird sings and the body is trembling, that is a signal that people are coming or something important is about to happen?

Ocklawaha

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Re: Southern Rock
« Reply #50 on: October 28, 2012, 10:31:29 PM »
When people refer to "Southern Rock", they're almost always talking about a particular subgenre, not just any and all rock from the South (or with Southern influence). Taken that way, again, I don't think you can go much farther back than the Allmans. And neither Southern Rock nor rock music in general have "deeper roots" than other modern styles like the blues and r&b, considering its roots are in the blues and r&b.

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/PZTmonBKwQo?version=3&amp;amp;hl=en_US" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/PZTmonBKwQo?version=3&amp;amp;hl=en_US</a>

"...Considering it's roots are IN the blues and R&B" Yes, those are the roots, and they go back to the earliest forms of what might be termed 'modern music,' consequently the roots of R&B ARE the roots of Southern Rock.  The real split came when the first Ragtime musicians tore into traditional and folk. The actual roots of Southern Rock are lifted from African American poetry generally using a three line stanza with the first two lines being similar. All of this is set to a twelve bar harmonic framework called a blues progression. Dating well into 1800's the Blues were well established by 1900.  This music style was adopted by the early Jazz musicians in the working class citizens of the bayou's and riverfront cities. Each city developed it's own style, and from this sprang Elvis, from Elvis Rock, from Rock back into the bayou's and swamps of the Southern Rock genre. I'm not claiming Elvis played 'Southern Rock' but through much evolution, including people like Janis Joplin, and several of the electric musicians from the left coast.  So while Janis wasn't singing Southern Rock, there is no denying the influences of Blues and Jazz, Southern Rock became a fusion of Blues-Jazz-Rock-County and Zydeco. It is still a living music form.

My whole purpose in 'going there' is that a huge portion of the MJ demographic grew up with Rap, Hip-Hop and Pop, they have neither listened to 'Southern Rock' nor could they define it. My partner in posting this thread is quite connaître of Rock. I really don't want a museum or hall of fame that doesn't go into these roots. The cool thing is that Blues-Jazz-Rock-Zydeco and Country music were, for the most part, born in the south. The blues themselves may date their first public performance to Jacksonville.


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Re: Southern Rock
« Reply #51 on: October 29, 2012, 03:49:17 AM »
"The blues themselves may date their first public performance to Jacksonville."

I seriously doubt that. No one knows when the first public performance of the blues was. There's just no way to know.

Adam W

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Re: Southern Rock
« Reply #52 on: October 29, 2012, 04:18:31 AM »
Southern Rock has deeper roots then any other form of modern music, don't believe it? Well, ''You Ain't Nothing But A Hound Dog." How about the very first Rock mega star?

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/GR3i3H2nR-A?version=3&amp;amp;hl=en_US" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/GR3i3H2nR-A?version=3&amp;amp;hl=en_US</a>

When people refer to "Southern Rock", they're almost always talking about a particular subgenre, not just any and all rock from the South (or with Southern influence). Taken that way, again, I don't think you can go much farther back than the Allmans. And neither Southern Rock nor rock music in general have "deeper roots" than other modern styles like the blues and r&b, considering its roots are in the blues and r&b.

Totally agree. Rock music more or less came from the South (but not totally) - but it doesn't mean it is what we're referring to when we talk about "Southern Rock." That's why I jokingly referred to Chuck Berry earlier.

Southern Rock is a genre of rock. I used to view the Allmans as falling just slight before it and inspiring it, but I have mended my ways and now accept them as being at the vanguard of the movement. But at the same time, not all rock from the South that came after the Allmans counts as Southern Rock.

It's a sound or style and a general attitude or approach. It's a conscious attempt to fit into a genre. I don't think it was on the part of the Allmans or even Lynyrd Skynyrd, but I do think it became so over time.

sheclown

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Re: Southern Rock
« Reply #53 on: October 29, 2012, 07:52:22 AM »
It is important to identify the components of Southern Rock as Ock said the FUSION of other elements.

Certainly other rockers came from the south, but they don't necessarily belong in the sub genre.

Jacksonville has had a particularly strong contribution to Southern Rock which is why we need to identify it and celebrate it.  Everyone always complains that Jacksonville doesn't have a identity.  HA! 

This identity is gritty and working class, we need to wear it and be proud of it. 


Adam W

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Re: Southern Rock
« Reply #54 on: October 29, 2012, 09:14:29 AM »
"The blues themselves may date their first public performance to Jacksonville."

I seriously doubt that. No one knows when the first public performance of the blues was. There's just no way to know.

There is however a way to know when the first recorded instance of the music being called "the blues', and that is here in Jacksonville at the old Aerodrome.

When was that (date)? Do you have a link to a source?

Adam W

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Re: Southern Rock
« Reply #55 on: October 29, 2012, 09:27:41 AM »
Thanks Stephen. I figured (after reading your post to me) that there was probably something on the site, so I found the article and the link to the dissertation.

So, Jax (LaVilla - right?) was the site of the earliest professional blues performance that we have record of. And it is the earliest recorded example of the word "blues" being used to describe the form of music.

sheclown

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Re: Southern Rock
« Reply #56 on: October 29, 2012, 12:45:04 PM »
Early 38 special sounding very Southern Rock

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/SpLaUn_FRYw?version=3&amp;amp;hl=en_US" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/SpLaUn_FRYw?version=3&amp;amp;hl=en_US</a>


Quote
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
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38 Special

38 Special (2010)
Background information
Origin    Jacksonville, Florida,
United States
Genres    Southern rock, hard rock, country rock
Years active    1974–present
Labels    A&M
Associated acts    Lynyrd Skynyrd, Van Zant, Trace Adkins, Grand Funk Railroad
Website    www.38special.com
Members
Donnie Van Zant
Don Barnes
Larry Junstrom
Danny Chauncey
Bobby Capps
Gary Moffatt
Past members
Jeff Carlisi
Jack Grondin
Steve Brookins
Ken Lyons
Carol Bristow
Dale Krantz
Nancy Henderson
Lu Moss
Steve McRay
Lynn Hineman
Max Carl
Scott Meeder
Scott Hoffman
Donny Baldwin

38 Special (also written .38 Special or Thirty-Eight Special) is an American rock band that was formed by neighborhood friends Don Barnes and Donnie Van Zant in 1974 in Jacksonville, Florida.[1] The band's first two albums had a strong southern rock influence. By the early 1980s, 38 Special shifted to a more accessible arena rock style without abandoning its southern rock roots. This shift helped to usher in a string of successful albums and singles.

Their breakthrough hit was "Hold On Loosely" (1981). "Caught Up in You" (1982) and "If I'd Been the One" (1983) both hit No. 1 on Billboard magazine's Album Rock Tracks chart. "Back Where You Belong" (1984) continued the annual sequence of radio favorites. In 1985 they had another hit with "Teacher Teacher," written by Jim Vallance and Bryan Adams. The song climbed to #4 on the Billboard Top Tracks Chart / spent (10 weeks on the chart). Their last well known hit was "Second Chance" (1989) was a No. 1 hit on Billboard's adult contemporary chart.

In 2007, 38 Special was the opening act on Lynyrd Skynyrd and Hank Williams Jr.'s Rowdy Frynds Tour, and on September 27, 2008, they filmed a CMT Crossroads special with country singer Trace Adkins, performing both artists' hits from over the years. In 2009, 38 Special opened for REO Speedwagon and Styx as part of the "Can't Stop Rockin' Tour."

As of 2011, the lineup consists of Don Barnes, Donnie Van Zant, guitarist Danny Chauncey, bassist Larry Junstrom, keyboardist Bobby Capps and drummer Gary Moffatt.

Later 38 Special with a different sound:


<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/zg21Rkew874?version=3&amp;amp;hl=en_US&quot;" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/zg21Rkew874?version=3&amp;amp;hl=en_US&quot;</a>

« Last Edit: October 29, 2012, 12:47:30 PM by sheclown »

sheclown

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Re: Southern Rock
« Reply #57 on: October 29, 2012, 02:25:09 PM »
<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/n92AZIlMmsQ?version=3&amp;amp;hl=en_US&quot;&gt;&lt;/param&gt;&lt;param name=&quot;allowFullScreen&quot; value=&quot;true&quot;&gt;&lt;/param&gt;&lt;param name=&quot;allowscriptaccess&quot; value=&quot;always&quot;&gt;&lt;/param&gt;&lt;embed src=&quot;http://www.youtube.com/v/n92AZIlMmsQ?version=3&amp;amp;hl=en_US" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/n92AZIlMmsQ?version=3&amp;amp;hl=en_US&quot;&gt;&lt;/param&gt;&lt;param name=&quot;allowFullScreen&quot; value=&quot;true&quot;&gt;&lt;/param&gt;&lt;param name=&quot;allowscriptaccess&quot; value=&quot;always&quot;&gt;&lt;/param&gt;&lt;embed src=&quot;http://www.youtube.com/v/n92AZIlMmsQ?version=3&amp;amp;hl=en_US</a>

gritty, southern-rocky.


« Last Edit: October 29, 2012, 06:43:44 PM by sheclown »

Ocklawaha

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Re: Southern Rock
« Reply #58 on: October 30, 2012, 10:48:50 PM »
How about some southern/western rock? The Outlaws From Tampa Florida certainly qualify. Funny thing is they too owe their success to friends in Jacksonville!


The Outlaws are a southern rock band formed in Tampa, Florida in late 1967 by guitarist–vocalist Hughie Thomasson, drummer David Dix, bassist Phil Holmberg, guitarists Hobie O'Brien and Frank Guidry, plus singer Herb Pino. Guidry brought the name Outlaws with him when he joined (he had been in another group that had that name). Previous to Guidry's arrival the band was called The Rogues, then The Four Letter Words.

In 1974 Charlie Brusco signed on as manager for The Outlaws. Alan Walden (brother of Capricorn Records founder Phil Walden) was told of the group by Lynyrd Skynyrd frontman Ronnie Van Zant and he joined forces with Brusco as co-manager.

The band was the first act signed to Arista Records under Clive Davis. Davis was in the audience at a show in 1974 where the band was opening for Lynyrd Skynyrd in Columbia, South Carolina. At the end of Lynyrd Skynyrd's set, lead vocalist Ronnie Van Zant said from the stage: “If you don’t sign the Outlaws, you’re the dumbest music person I’ve ever met—and I know you’re not.”

The Outlaws' earliest well known songs were "There Goes Another Love Song" and "Green Grass and High Tides", both from their 1975 self-titled debut album. Their 1980 cover of "(Ghost) Riders in the Sky" from the album Ghost Riders was their biggest single chart success, reaching No. 31 on the Billboard "Pop Singles" chart.

...And of course being a slightly misplaced 'Oklahoma State Cowboy,' this one is near and dear to my heart.


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sheclown

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Re: Southern Rock
« Reply #59 on: October 31, 2012, 12:25:03 PM »
Quote
Southern rock is a subgenre of rock music, and genre of Americana. It developed in the Southern United States from rock and roll, country music, and blues, and is focused generally on electric guitar and vocals. Although it is unknown from where the term southern rock came, "many people feel that these important contributors to the development of rock and roll have been minimized in rock's history."[1]

Okay...

Elements of.

Seems as if the British invasion split rock into two categories.  Adam?  Do you agree?

Or three categories?  Or more? 

What is Southern Rock?

Musically
Stylistically
Thematically

Personally, I would say, it doesn't seem to matter as much where the band is from as what it sounds like, how it sounds like it does and what it sings about.