Author Topic: Southern Rock  (Read 208389 times)

Ernest Street

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Re: Southern Rock
« Reply #30 on: October 28, 2012, 12:59:32 AM »
SheClown..your #20 Allman Bros song "Jessica" is MY Southern Rock song..no words.

Anyone know which house in Riverside the Brothers were living in?..is it just a Jax urban myth? 

Adam W

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Re: Southern Rock
« Reply #31 on: October 28, 2012, 07:59:52 AM »
Adam,

Allman Brothers not "gritty" enough?

SheClown -

Interesting question. I missed this post, sorry.

I think it's not so much "gritty" as the fact that I always thought stylistically they were more like a hippie band - much like a lot of their British contemporaries. They favored long, rambling blues-based jams. Indeed, "Mountain Jam" is based on a song by Donovan. So they seemed to be a Southern version of Blind Faith or Cream or something.

Lynryrd Skynyrd, on the other hand, didn't really strike me as being hippies - even though they were only a few years later (and they certainly overlapped). They are definitely 70s hard rockers. Their music is much more direct and, although there was a bit of jamming (live) on the guitar solos, they were pretty straight-forward. They may have taken some stylistic cues from the Allmans and may share some common influences, but they are two very different bands that produced very different music.

In many ways, Lynyrd Skynyrd are like a redneck Thin Lizzy (probably a facile description based on the twin lead guitars, but I think the story telling and hard rock aspects - as well as the incorporation of blues strengthens the comparison a bit).

sheclown

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Re: Southern Rock
« Reply #32 on: October 28, 2012, 08:25:40 AM »
<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/WfM6nRVBvGs?version=3&amp;amp;hl=en_US" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/WfM6nRVBvGs?version=3&amp;amp;hl=en_US</a>

Great question about the Allman's Riverside house.  Anyone know?




Ocklawaha

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Re: Southern Rock
« Reply #33 on: October 28, 2012, 10:29:17 AM »
I've always thought that Jessica is one of the greatest songs to wake up to. Otherwise another southern rock group out of Fort Worth, Texas, can blow the sleep out of your eyes (if you like ELECTRIC music) with a piece called "Lucky In The Morning."

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/uoEZb9fbR0U?version=3&amp;amp;hl=en_US" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/uoEZb9fbR0U?version=3&amp;amp;hl=en_US</a>


Ocklawaha

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Re: Southern Rock
« Reply #34 on: October 28, 2012, 10:45:49 AM »
OZARK MOUNTAIN DAREDEVILS, had a great Southern hit song, "If You Want To Get To Heaven - You've Got To
Raise A Little Hell." The OMD group did a lot of songs that were just plain fun.

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/eVtHMDJcmxE?version=3&amp;amp;hl=en_US" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/eVtHMDJcmxE?version=3&amp;amp;hl=en_US</a>

sheclown

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Re: Southern Rock
« Reply #35 on: October 28, 2012, 11:39:53 AM »
As far as GRIT-factor goes, Black Oak Arkansas has it hands down, don't you think? 

Ocklawaha

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Re: Southern Rock
« Reply #36 on: October 28, 2012, 12:42:22 PM »
Absolutely!

Ocklawaha

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Re: Southern Rock
« Reply #37 on: October 28, 2012, 12:47:23 PM »
....And now, from Spartanburg, South Carolina, THE MARSHALL TUCKER BAND playing 'Can't you see...'

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/gCXQycyN_Vs?version=3&amp;amp;hl=en_US" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/gCXQycyN_Vs?version=3&amp;amp;hl=en_US</a>

Adam W

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Re: Southern Rock
« Reply #38 on: October 28, 2012, 01:16:00 PM »
OZARK MOUNTAIN DAREDEVILS, had a great Southern hit song, "If You Want To Get To Heaven - You've Got To
Raise A Little Hell." The OMD group did a lot of songs that were just plain fun.

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/eVtHMDJcmxE?version=3&amp;amp;hl=en_US" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/eVtHMDJcmxE?version=3&amp;amp;hl=en_US</a>

The only OMD that is worth a damn is Orchestral Maneouvers in the Dark:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Omd

Architecture and Morality makes the shortlist for "best albums of all time." Easily.

Ocklawaha

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Re: Southern Rock
« Reply #39 on: October 28, 2012, 03:08:58 PM »
LOBO:

"Me and You and a Dog Named Boo," which for those of us that wandered the country during the 60's-70's was certainly some sort of 'anthem.' If you sing along and get misty eyed, YOU WERE THERE.

Birth name   Roland Kent LaVoie
Born    July 31, 1943 (age 69)
Origin   Tallahassee, Florida, U.S.
Genres   Pop, country, folk, soft rock

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/hmZv5ND2YuI?version=3&amp;amp;hl=en_US" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/hmZv5ND2YuI?version=3&amp;amp;hl=en_US</a>

sheclown

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Re: Southern Rock
« Reply #40 on: October 28, 2012, 05:26:30 PM »
 Dave Hlubek was seen hanging out with John Wells at the Main Street cruise this weekend!

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David Lawrence Hlubek [pronounced "LOO'-bek"] was born on August 28, 1951. He is the lead guitarist and founding member of the Southern Rock band Molly Hatchet.

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/9MxkpCe4Iv4?version=3&amp;amp;hl=en_US&quot;&gt;&lt;/param&gt;&lt;param name=&quot;allowFullScreen&quot; value=&quot;true&quot;&gt;&lt;/param&gt;&lt;param name=&quot;allowscriptaccess&quot; value=&quot;always&quot;&gt;&lt;/param&gt;&lt;embed src=&quot;http://www.youtube.com/v/9MxkpCe4Iv4?version=3&amp;amp;hl=en_US" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/9MxkpCe4Iv4?version=3&amp;amp;hl=en_US&quot;&gt;&lt;/param&gt;&lt;param name=&quot;allowFullScreen&quot; value=&quot;true&quot;&gt;&lt;/param&gt;&lt;param name=&quot;allowscriptaccess&quot; value=&quot;always&quot;&gt;&lt;/param&gt;&lt;embed src=&quot;http://www.youtube.com/v/9MxkpCe4Iv4?version=3&amp;amp;hl=en_US</a>

Dave was born a "Southern boy" in Jacksonville, Florida.[1] At the age of 5 or 6, Dave and his family moved to the Naval base in Oahu, Hawaii where he attended Waikiki Elementary School. From there, Hlubek's father was transferred and the family moved to Sunnyvale, California, then to Mountain View, and finally settling in San Jose. There he attended the same Junior High School as Wayne Newton. It was the South Bay that Dave called home during the next few years, before moving back to Jacksonville, Florida around 1965. There he attended and graduated from Forrest High School along with other legends of Southern Rock.

Hlubek, along with Steve Holland, founded the band Molly Hatchet



sheclown

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Re: Southern Rock
« Reply #41 on: October 28, 2012, 05:30:30 PM »
"Can't you see"  what a great song.  1973. 

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The Marshall Tucker Band is an American Southern rock/country rock band originally from Spartanburg, South Carolina. The band's blend of rock, rhythm and blues, jazz, country, and gospel[1] helped establish the Southern rock genre in the early 1970s.[2] While the band had reached the height of its commercial success by the end of the decade, the band has recorded and performed continuously under various lineups for nearly 40 years.[2]

The original lineup of the Marshall Tucker Band, formed in 1972, included lead guitarist, vocalist, and primary songwriter Toy Caldwell (1947–1993), vocalist Doug Gray (b. 1948), keyboard player, saxaphone player, and flutist Jerry Eubanks (b. 1950), rhythm guitarist George McCorkle (1946–2007), drummer Paul Riddle (b. 1953), and bassist Tommy Caldwell (1949–1980). They signed with Capricorn Records and in 1973 released their first LP, The Marshall Tucker Band. After Tommy Caldwell was killed in an automobile accident in 1980, he was replaced by bassist Franklin Wilkie. Most of the original band members had left by the mid-1980s to pursue other projects.[3] The band's lineup as of 2009 consists of Gray on vocals, guitarist Stuart Swanlund (died August 4, 2012),[4] keyboard player and flutist Marcus James Henderson, guitarist Rick Willis, bassist Pat Elwood, and drummer B.B. Borden.[5]

sheclown

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Re: Southern Rock
« Reply #42 on: October 28, 2012, 05:31:59 PM »
LOBO:

"Me and You and a Dog Named Boo," which for those of us that wandered the country during the 60's-70's was certainly some sort of 'anthem.' If you sing along and get misty eyed, YOU WERE THERE.

Birth name   Roland Kent LaVoie
Born    July 31, 1943 (age 69)
Origin   Tallahassee, Florida, U.S.
Genres   Pop, country, folk, soft rock

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/hmZv5ND2YuI?version=3&amp;amp;hl=en_US" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/hmZv5ND2YuI?version=3&amp;amp;hl=en_US</a>

seriously?  I never ONCE got misty-eyed. Nauseous perhaps, but never misty-eyed.    ;D
« Last Edit: October 28, 2012, 05:35:20 PM by sheclown »

Ocklawaha

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Re: Southern Rock
« Reply #43 on: October 28, 2012, 06:40:47 PM »
Who would of thunk that the old Lobo song would have that effect on the nearly 700 people who commented on the Youtube link? Don't know where you were, but thumbing from coast to coast and/or living out of a VW microbus named 'Lucy,' shared by 2 young ladies, a dog and two cats and one giant size sleeping bag...Nuff said!

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/WXV_QjenbDw?version=3&amp;amp;hl=en_US" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/WXV_QjenbDw?version=3&amp;amp;hl=en_US</a>

Quote
"They laughed me out of class, out of town, out of the state." Love, Janis.

This is another Southern Sweetheart, Jannis Jopplin was "born on the bayou," in the Kansas City Southern, Railroad town of Port Arthur, Texas. 

Primarily a painter while still in school, she first began singing blues and folk music with friends. While at Thomas Jefferson High School, she stated that she was mostly shunned. Joplin was quoted as saying, "I was a misfit. I read, I painted, I didn't hate Negroes.  As a teen, she became overweight and her skin broke out so badly she was left with deep scars which required dermabrasion. Other kids at high school would routinely taunt her and call her names like "pig", "freak" or "creep". Among her classmates were G. W. Bailey and Jimmy Johnson.

Joplin graduated from high school in 1960 and attended Lamar State College of Technology in Beaumont, Texas, during the summer and later the University of Texas at Austin, though she did not complete her studies. The campus newspaper The Daily Texan ran a profile of her in the issue dated July 27, 1962, headlined "She Dares to Be Different". The article began, "She goes barefooted when she feels like it, wears Levi's to class because they're more comfortable, and carries her Autoharp with her everywhere she goes so that in case she gets the urge to break into song it will be handy. Her name is Janis Joplin."

Singing career: 1962-1965

Joplin's house at 122 Lyon Street in Haight-Ashbury in San Francisco, California. She lived there in the 1960s with her boyfriend Country Joe McDonald.

Cultivating a rebellious manner, Joplin styled herself in part after her female blues heroines and, in part, after the Beat poets. Her first song recorded on tape, at the home of a fellow student in December 1962, was "What Good Can Drinkin' Do". She left Texas for San Francisco ("just to get away from Texas", she said, "because my head was in a much different place") in January 1963, living in North Beach and later Haight-Ashbury. In 1964, Joplin and future Jefferson Airplane guitarist Jorma Kaukonen recorded a number of blues standards, further accompanied by Margareta Kaukonen on typewriter (as a percussion instrument). This session included seven tracks: "Typewriter Talk", "Trouble in Mind", "Kansas City Blues", "Hesitation Blues", "Nobody Knows You When You're Down and Out", "Daddy, Daddy, Daddy" and "Long Black Train Blues", and was later released as the bootleg album The Typewriter Tape.

Read more: http://www.answers.com/topic/janis-joplin#ixzz2AdQIzb5Q

sheclown

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Re: Southern Rock
« Reply #44 on: October 28, 2012, 06:56:26 PM »
Haha!!  Ock.  Don't blame you for loving that song.

Me?  I was too cool for school, cutting class and using my fake ID to drink in Georgetown (DC) bars.  Nuff said about that as well.

I thought about Janis this afternoon too.  A Texas section.

Okay...Texas southern rockers...Go!