Author Topic: Southern Rock  (Read 211187 times)

Adam W

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Re: Southern Rock
« Reply #75 on: November 03, 2012, 09:37:17 AM »
Little bit of info from John Wells:

Most people don't know it but the Allman Bros. band started in Jacksonville. At one time they lived in Sherwood Forrest on the northside. There was a teen club on Soutel Dr. behind the Pic n' Sav. They used to play there. THE ALLMAN JOYS!!
WHAT A HOOT!!!

That's pretty well known. Butch Trucks is from Jacksonville, I believe. I used to be friends with Berry Oakley's daughter until we had a big falling out... but she lived in Jax for a long time (and she might still, for all I know).


sheclown

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Re: Southern Rock
« Reply #76 on: November 03, 2012, 05:44:53 PM »
What other stories are out there Adam?  This is a very cool piece of Jacksonville's unique southern rock history.  Those of us who didn't grow up here love to hear them.

Adam W

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Re: Southern Rock
« Reply #77 on: November 03, 2012, 05:57:13 PM »
Well, re: "The Jug" - I heard that Van Zant wrote the song about The Pastime Bar, but used the name The Jug because it worked better with the rhyme scheme or whatever. Anyway, The Jug was The Little Brown Jug and that was up just off Stockton Street, I think on Edison. It was a package store with a bar. I stumbled across it one day many years ago (before they did all the construction on Stockton and I-10) and saw a documentary on Lynyrd Skynyrd shortly thereafter. Not sure how true that is, but they alluded to it in the documentary. Anyway, I think the Little Brown Jug is gone now.

sheclown

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Re: Southern Rock
« Reply #78 on: November 03, 2012, 07:36:53 PM »
First Southern Rock Song,
"Gimme Three Steps".... Skynryds first single (?) I mean arguably.
 In terms of popularity to support Tacachale, Skynryd sells a million albums a year. When in NYC, I knew several grunge players who loved Skynyd and never mentioned Allman Brothers.

Interesting story about "Gimme Three Steps"

Quote
The song is memorable for its opening riff and story of how the speaker was dancing with a girl named Linda Lou at a bar when a man, probably the girl's boyfriend or husband, enters with a gun (described as a .44) and catches them, angrily believing her to be cheating. The song's title refers to the chorus, "Won't you give me three steps/Gimme three steps mister/Gimme three steps towards the door?/Gimme three steps/Gimme three steps mister/And you'll never see me no more."[2] essentially asking for three steps head start to flee. The song is also based on a real-life experience Ronnie Van Zant had at a biker bar in Jacksonville known as The Pastime, including having a gun pulled on him, and thus inspiring him to write the lyrics on his way home.[3]

On September 22, 2012, The Pastime Bar, located at the intersection of Normandy Boulevard and Lenox Avenues (5301 Lenox Avenue, Jacksonville, Florida), walking distance from the Van Zant family home at that time, will be re-dedicated and renamed The Jug.

On September 25, 2012, it was announced that The Jug may close forever due to the lack of renovation funds and church influence from The Potters House church located on Normandy Boulevard. It is being discussed to see if The Jug can be "grandfathered" into doing business as it has been at its current location for some 40 years and the church currently occupies an old retail outlet. A petition has been started on Facebook at facebook.com/savethejug and outreach started to local entertainment who has worked with Lynyrd Skynyrd over the years for their assistance in keeping The Jug open.
Personnel

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gimme_Three_Steps

photo of "The Jug" today.






Adam W

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Re: Southern Rock
« Reply #79 on: November 03, 2012, 07:47:31 PM »
^Did you not read what I posted? I acknowledged the Pastime. But the use of "The Jug" as the name comes from a different bar. Van Zant used the name of the Jug because it rhymed. The Pastime was never called the Jug. The Jug was a different bar in a different place.

Anyway...

http://www.lynyrdskynyrdhistory.com/less4.html

http://www.lynyrdskynyrdhistory.com/tr.html

The URL above has Gary Rossington's recounting of the story. It has a picture of both bars.
« Last Edit: November 03, 2012, 08:00:17 PM by Adam W »

thunnus

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Re: Southern Rock
« Reply #80 on: November 03, 2012, 10:35:02 PM »
What about the Truckers? I realize they're not the original line up, but the Muscle Shoals, AL pedigree has to give them some bump up.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vqe3qyxNrwA

Adam W

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Re: Southern Rock
« Reply #81 on: November 04, 2012, 06:09:38 AM »
Take a look at the top of this page :D
« Last Edit: November 04, 2012, 06:18:55 AM by Adam W »

strider

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Re: Southern Rock
« Reply #82 on: November 04, 2012, 07:12:09 AM »
^Did you not read what I posted? I acknowledged the Pastime. But the use of "The Jug" as the name comes from a different bar. Van Zant used the name of the Jug because it rhymed. The Pastime was never called the Jug. The Jug was a different bar in a different place.

Ahh, did you not read what was posted?  Regardless of what you have posted, the fact is the Pastime was also called the Jug at some point in time - look at the picture posted above.  The letters The Jug are not in the best of shape, but are there and obviously have been there for quite some time.

Ii appears from the various things posted that Van Zant did change the name of the bar in the song and that is why the Pastime is now also called the Jug as the incident did indeed happen in the Pastime (once called West Tavern?).
« Last Edit: November 04, 2012, 07:13:44 AM by strider »
"My father says that almost the whole world is asleep. Everybody you know. Everybody you see. Everybody you talk to. He says that only a few people are awake and they live in a state of constant total amazement." Patrica, Joe VS the Volcano.

sheclown

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Re: Southern Rock
« Reply #83 on: November 04, 2012, 08:03:07 AM »
What about the Truckers? I realize they're not the original line up, but the Muscle Shoals, AL pedigree has to give them some bump up.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vqe3qyxNrwA

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/vqe3qyxNrwA?version=3&amp;amp;hl=en_US" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/vqe3qyxNrwA?version=3&amp;amp;hl=en_US</a>

Quote
The Muscle Shoals Sound Studio was formed in Muscle Shoals, Alabama, in 1969 when musicians Barry Beckett (keyboards), Roger Hawkins (drums), Jimmy Johnson (guitar) and David Hood (bass) (called The Swampers) left FAME Studios to create their own studio. The Muscle Shoals Sound Rhythm Section, as they became known, was the first rhythm section to own its own studio and, eventually, its own publishing and production companies. The distinctive accompaniment and arrangements have been heard on a tremendous number of legendary recordings, including those from Wilson Pickett, Aretha Franklin, and the Staple Singers amongst others. Many artists have recorded hit songs and complete albums at the studio.

The original rhythm section that broke away to create these studios first formed in 1967 and initially played sessions in New York and Nashville as well as on the famous FAME recordings. The initial successes led to the arrival of more mainstream rock and pop performers among them The Rolling Stones, Traffic, Elton John, Boz Scaggs, Willie Nelson, Paul Simon, Bob Dylan, Dr. Hook, Elkie Brooks, Millie Jackson and Julian Lennon.

Muscle Shoals Sound Studios, along with the Muscle Shoals Rhythm Section, moved to new facilities off Alabama Avenue in Sheffield in the late 1970s.

The Muscle Shoals Sound Rhythm Section, who owned the original Muscle Shoals Sound Studios, are referred to as "the Swampers" in the lyrics of Sweet Home Alabama by Lynyrd Skynyrd.

The original Muscle Shoals Sound Studios building is located at 3614 Jackson Highway and is listed on The National Register of Historic Places.[1]

Although the original Muscle Shoals Sound Studios relocated from 3614 Jackson Highway to an updated and larger facility on Alabama Avenue in Sheffield, the building (now owned by Noel Webster) still sees occasional use as a recording studio. The Black Keys album Brothers, recorded there in 2009 achieved Grammy Award success in 2011 in the building formerly occupied by Muscle Shoals Sound Studios.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Muscle_Shoals_Sound_Studio

« Last Edit: November 04, 2012, 02:57:49 PM by sheclown »

Adam W

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Re: Southern Rock
« Reply #84 on: November 04, 2012, 08:13:04 AM »
^Did you not read what I posted? I acknowledged the Pastime. But the use of "The Jug" as the name comes from a different bar. Van Zant used the name of the Jug because it rhymed. The Pastime was never called the Jug. The Jug was a different bar in a different place.

Ahh, did you not read what was posted?  Regardless of what you have posted, the fact is the Pastime was also called the Jug at some point in time - look at the picture posted above.  The letters The Jug are not in the best of shape, but are there and obviously have been there for quite some time.

Ii appears from the various things posted that Van Zant did change the name of the bar in the song and that is why the Pastime is now also called the Jug as the incident did indeed happen in the Pastime (once called West Tavern?).

Fuck off.


I suppose any conversation can become contentious.

Well Sheclown, my comment above notwithstanding, I certainly didn't wish to get involved in a contentious discussion with you. You asked for a bit of trivia, and that was what I thought I was offering.

My point was simply that although the location of the incident described in the song was documented in this thread, the name of the bar (and only the name) was taken from another Jax (and North Riverside) location. That was not discussed before and I thought it was a new nugget that was worth mentioning. I realise now that my response to your reply might've seemed a bit short, but that is more an issue of the internet and how things can come across - it certainly wasn't my intent.

I had, however, read all that stuff the first time it was posted in this thread and was aware of it from living in Jax and Riverside.

The URLs I posted are from a (supposedly) official Lynyrd Skynyrd site and show pics of the old Little Brown Jug on Edison. Apparently it's no longer there. I suppose the owners of the Pastime added "The Jug" to their bar to reinforce the connection between their bar and the bar depicted in the song.

As far as that other poster, I have no idea what his issue is, but whatever.

sheclown

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Re: Southern Rock
« Reply #85 on: November 04, 2012, 10:19:18 AM »
Adam, the URLs have some great info!

I think there ought to be a sign when you cross into Jacksonville:
Quote
Welcome to Jacksonville
Home of Southern Rock.

(as far as that other poster goes, that would be my knight-in-shining-armor, Joe).

sheclown

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Re: Southern Rock
« Reply #86 on: November 04, 2012, 10:22:24 AM »
Little bit of info from John Wells:

Most people don't know it but the Allman Bros. band started in Jacksonville. At one time they lived in Sherwood Forrest on the northside. There was a teen club on Soutel Dr. behind the Pic n' Sav. They used to play there. THE ALLMAN JOYS!!
WHAT A HOOT!!!

That's pretty well known. Butch Trucks is from Jacksonville, I believe. I used to be friends with Berry Oakley's daughter until we had a big falling out... but she lived in Jax for a long time (and she might still, for all I know).


Quote
Claude Hudson "Butch" Trucks (born May 11, 1947 in Jacksonville, Florida) is an American drummer who is one of the founding members of The Allman Brothers Band.

One of Trucks' first bands was local Jacksonville band The Vikings, who made one 7-inch record in 1964. Another early band was The 31st of February which formed and broke up in 1968. This group's lineup eventually included both Duane Allman and Gregg Allman. They recorded a cover of "Morning Dew", by 1960s folk singer Bonnie Dobson.

Trucks then helped form The Allman Brothers Band in 1969, along with Duane Allman (guitar), Gregg Allman (vocals and organ), Dickey Betts (guitar), Berry Oakley (bass), and fellow drummer Jai Johanny Johanson.

Together, the two drummers developed a rhythmic drive that would prove crucial to the band. Trucks laid down a powerful conventional beat while the jazz-influenced Johanson added a second laminate of percussion and ad libitum cymbal flourishes, seamlessly melded into one syncopated sound.

Said founding member and co-lead guitarist Dickey Betts of Trucks' addition to the original band lineup, "...When Butch came along, he had that freight train, meat-and-potatoes kind of thing that set Jaimoe up perfectly. He had the power thing we needed."[1]

Trucks continues to record and perform with the Allman Brothers Band today.

« Last Edit: November 13, 2012, 07:31:48 AM by sheclown »

Adam W

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Re: Southern Rock
« Reply #87 on: November 04, 2012, 10:26:56 AM »
My friend Kevin Snow's (drummer for the Black Kids) dad was in the Vikings with Butch Trucks. I think he played saxophone. Kevin once showed me their 7" single.

I totally forgot about that until you posted that. I bet he could get some money for that single on eBay or something.

sheclown

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Re: Southern Rock
« Reply #88 on: November 04, 2012, 10:27:12 AM »
More on Butch Trucks:

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/K_tGAWZaAXo?version=3&amp;amp;hl=en_US" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/K_tGAWZaAXo?version=3&amp;amp;hl=en_US</a>

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The 31st of February was a rock and roll band formed by Jacksonville, Florida natives Scott Boyer, David Brown and Butch Trucks.

All three were alumni of Englewood High School in Jacksonville, though they did not come together musically until Brown and Trucks found themselves living on the same floor of a dormitory at Florida State University in the fall of 1965.[1] Having heard the folk-rock of groups like The Byrds and The Lovin' Spoonful, saxophonist Brown bought an electric bass and started to jam with drummer Trucks, an alumnus of The Vikings, The Echoes and the Jacksonville Symphonette. Guitarist and vocalist Boyer, making his living as a folk singer, was contacted by Brown who offered his and Trucks' services if Boyer would trade his acoustic guitar for an electric guitar. Boyer agreed and the three formed a group, The Bitter Ind. (short for Independents).[1]

Playing fraternity parties, growing their hair long and ceasing to attend their classes (in Brown's and Trucks' cases), the group left Tallahassee after the end of the school year and tried their hand at performing in Daytona Beach. After being turned down repeatedly by club owners, the group found a bit of luck, landing a one-night performance at the Club Martinique. Shortly into their set, two members of the Allman Joys, a group that frequently appeared at the club, walked in and sat down. After the group finished, the two members introduced themselves and lavished praise on the group. They were the namesakes of the Allman Joys, Duane and Gregg Allman. When the Bitter Ind. relayed their story of their inability to get steady employment, the Allmans offered them free lodging.[2] In time, the Bitter Ind. returned to Jacksonville discouraged, their meeting with the brothers Allman the only high point of their journey.

Shortly after returning to Jacksonville, however, Trucks received a call from Duane Allman, stating that the Allman Joys were playing at the Beachcomber, a Jacksonville club, and that they needed a drummer. Trucks agreed to sit in for the night. After the show, Duane Allman suggested to Trucks to ask the club manager to let the Bitter Ind. audition. The manager agreed, loved the group's sound and let them stay on through mid-1967.[3] After their engagement ended, the group, no doubt under threat of legal action from the New York nightclub The Bitter End, decided to change their name. After briefly using the moniker "The Tiffany System", the group found themselves in Miami, Florida, signed to folk giant Vanguard Records as The 31st of February. Their eponymous debut album was released in early 1968, a heady mix of folk-rock and psychedelic pop. After its failure to get noticed, the group added a lead guitarist and began to rework their sound.[4]

Almost immediately, the group again ran into Duane and Gregg Allman, who had just broken up their post-Allman Joys group The Hour Glass. Electing to join forces, the newly-hired guitarist was fired and the remaining five-piece began performing throughout the Southeast. In September 1968, they began recording material for their second album, including nacsent versions of "Melissa" (which would come out on the Allman Brothers Band's Eat A Peach album in 1972) and "Nobody Knows You When You're Down And Out" (which Duane Allman would later cut with Derek and the Dominos).[5] Though the material would not come out until four years later, they serve as an important bridge towards the sound that The Allman Brothers Band would be producing within twelve months. Whilst in the midst of recording and touring, Gregg Allman elected to move out to southern California in order to let his brother and the remaining members of the Hour Glass be freed from their contract with Liberty Records. Though Gregg offered the others positions in his backing band,[6] nothing came of it and in a matter of months, Butch Trucks would join Duane and Gregg Allman in The Allman Brothers Band.

Scott Boyer ended up forming the group Cowboy with Tommy Talton, eventually signing to the Allman Brothers Band's label, Capricorn Records. He is currently recovering from artery replacement surgery.[7]

David Brown ended up a studio bassist, eventually joining Boz Scaggs's band and, later, Cowboy with Boyer. He remains a member of Norton Buffalo and the Knockouts despite Norton Buffalo's untimely death on 30 October 2009.[8][9]

After joining the Allman Brothers Band, Butch Trucks has stayed there since 1969, save for the group's first (1976–1979) and second (1982–1989) hiatuses.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_31st_of_February

And his nephew:
<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/UO9eF44ExQk?version=3&amp;amp;hl=en_US" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/UO9eF44ExQk?version=3&amp;amp;hl=en_US</a>

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Derek Trucks is an American guitarist, songwriter and founder of the Grammy Award winning[1] The Derek Trucks Band. He became an official member of The Allman Brothers Band in 1999 and formed the Tedeschi Trucks Band in 2010 with his wife Susan Tedeschi. His musical style encompasses several genres and he has twice appeared on Rolling Stone's list of 100 Greatest Guitarists of All Time; currently 16th on the list.

Trucks was born June 8, 1979, in Jacksonville, Florida. His uncle, Butch, is a founding member of The Allman Brothers Band.[2] According to Trucks, the name of Eric Clapton's band, Derek and the Dominos, had "something to do with the name [Derek] if not the spelling”.[3] His great-uncle, Virgil Trucks, was a professional baseball player.[4]

Trucks bought his first guitar at a yard sale for $5 at age nine and became a child prodigy who played his first paid performance at age 11.[5][6] Trucks began playing the guitar using a "slide" bar because it allowed him to play the guitar despite his small, young hands.[7] By his 13th birthday Trucks had played along side Buddy Guy[8] and gone on tour with The Allman Brothers Band.[2][

Trucks formed The Derek Trucks Band in 1996 and[5][9] by his twentieth birthday, he had played with artists including Bob Dylan, Joe Walsh and Stephen Stills.[10] After performing with The Allman Brothers Band for several years as a guest musician, Trucks became a formal member in 1999 [5] and appeared on the albums Live at the Beacon Theatre and Hittin' the Note. In 2006 Trucks began a studio collaboration with Eric Clapton called The Road to Escondido and Trucks found himself performing with three bands in 17 different countries that year.[5] Trucks was invited to perform at the 2007 Crossroads Guitar Festival and after the festival he toured as part of Clapton's band.[5][11]

Trucks built a studio in his home in January 2008 and he and his band recorded the album Already Free.[12] Truck's and his wife, Susan Tedeschi, combined their bands to form the Soul Stew Revival in 2007 and performed at the Bonnaroo Music Festival in June 2008.[12][13][14][15][15] In late 2009, Trucks and his band went on hiatus and then dissolved. In 2010, Trucks formed the Tedeschi Trucks Band with his wife.[16][17][18]

...................

In 2010, The Derek Trucks Band won the Grammy Award for Best Contemporary Blues Album for the album Already Free. In 2012, Trucks and Tedeschi as the Tedeschi Trucks Band won the Grammy Award for Best Blues Album for the band's debut album Revelator.[32]

On February 12, 2012, Trucks accepted a Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award along with ten other members of The Allman Brothers Band.[33][34] On February 21, Derek Trucks and his wife joined other blues musicians for a performance at the White House for President Obama and his guests.[35]
« Last Edit: November 13, 2012, 10:11:36 AM by sheclown »

Adam W

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Re: Southern Rock
« Reply #89 on: November 04, 2012, 10:32:50 AM »
Here's a video for the Vikings. It looks like Kevin made this and posted it on YouTube:

http://youtu.be/tfMN5ODAoGk

Edit: couldn't figure out how to embed the video, so just posted a link.