Author Topic: Southern Rock  (Read 208391 times)

Tacachale

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Re: Southern Rock
« Reply #60 on: October 31, 2012, 02:26:08 PM »
Quote
Southern rock is a subgenre of rock music, and genre of Americana. It developed in the Southern United States from rock and roll, country music, and blues, and is focused generally on electric guitar and vocals. Although it is unknown from where the term southern rock came, "many people feel that these important contributors to the development of rock and roll have been minimized in rock's history."[1]

Okay...

Elements of.

Seems as if the British invasion split rock into two categories.  Adam?  Do you agree?

Or three categories?  Or more? 

What is Southern Rock?

Musically
Stylistically
Thematically

Personally, I would say, it doesn't seem to matter as much where the band is from as what it sounds like, how it sounds like it does and what it sings about.

I wouldn't say that the British Invasion "split" rock music. I'd say it's one of, and probably the most important, of a number of developments that occurred in rock music following the decline of the original wave of rock-n-roll. From that time there was a much greater diversity in what people called "rock", for instance the "garage rock" movement and the adoption of traditional blues and folk forms into rock music. IMO that's the ground Southern Rock was built on.

I would say that geography is significant to Southern Rock more so than in other genres. From the 60s to the 80s basically all the significant Southern Rock bands were from the South, though often from more peripheral areas, like Florida, Oklahoma, and Missouri, if you count the Ozark Mountain Daredevils.
Do you believe that when the blue jay or another bird sings and the body is trembling, that is a signal that people are coming or something important is about to happen?

Ocklawaha

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Re: Southern Rock
« Reply #61 on: October 31, 2012, 02:38:12 PM »
I wouldn't say that the British Invasion "split" rock music. I'd say it's one of, and probably the most important, of a number of developments that occurred in rock music following the decline of the original wave of rock-n-roll. From that time there was a much greater diversity in what people called "rock", for instance the "garage rock" movement and the adoption of traditional blues and folk forms into rock music. IMO that's the ground Southern Rock was built on.

I would say that geography is significant to Southern Rock more so than in other genres. From the 60s to the 80s basically all the significant Southern Rock bands were from the South, though often from more peripheral areas, like Florida, Oklahoma, and Missouri, if you count the Ozark Mountain Daredevils.

Unless one considers CCR one of the great southern styled 'swamp music' bands, from 'Central California.'  As for the Ozark Mountain Daredevils from Springfield, Mo. (Arkansas border country) Unless your a black-belt, I wouldn't suggest telling anyone from there that 'Their not southern enough,' in any local bar.

Don't forget that there was a huge 'folk or folk rock' music movement generally prior to Southern Rock: Peter Paul and Mary, Simon and Garfunkel, Mamma's and Poppa's, Kingston Trio and if you ever caught them in a serious moment, The Smothers Brothers... Okay, well maybe not Tommy and Dickie.  ;D

Adam W

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Re: Southern Rock
« Reply #62 on: October 31, 2012, 02:40:36 PM »
But CCR really predate Southern Rock and are considered "Swamp Rock" whatever the hell that is.

Adam W

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Re: Southern Rock
« Reply #63 on: October 31, 2012, 02:43:36 PM »
Quote
Southern rock is a subgenre of rock music, and genre of Americana. It developed in the Southern United States from rock and roll, country music, and blues, and is focused generally on electric guitar and vocals. Although it is unknown from where the term southern rock came, "many people feel that these important contributors to the development of rock and roll have been minimized in rock's history."[1]

Okay...

Elements of.

Seems as if the British invasion split rock into two categories.  Adam?  Do you agree?

Or three categories?  Or more? 

What is Southern Rock?

Musically
Stylistically
Thematically

Personally, I would say, it doesn't seem to matter as much where the band is from as what it sounds like, how it sounds like it does and what it sings about.

I think the British Invasion helped move rock and roll into "rock." It was not exclusively the British, but they helped the move from singles to album-oriented rock music. The Beatles obviously played a large part, but they aren't the only ones. A lot of American bands played a part as well.


Tacachale

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Re: Southern Rock
« Reply #64 on: October 31, 2012, 03:25:05 PM »
I wouldn't say that the British Invasion "split" rock music. I'd say it's one of, and probably the most important, of a number of developments that occurred in rock music following the decline of the original wave of rock-n-roll. From that time there was a much greater diversity in what people called "rock", for instance the "garage rock" movement and the adoption of traditional blues and folk forms into rock music. IMO that's the ground Southern Rock was built on.

I would say that geography is significant to Southern Rock more so than in other genres. From the 60s to the 80s basically all the significant Southern Rock bands were from the South, though often from more peripheral areas, like Florida, Oklahoma, and Missouri, if you count the Ozark Mountain Daredevils.

Unless one considers CCR one of the great southern styled 'swamp music' bands, from 'Central California.'  As for the Ozark Mountain Daredevils from Springfield, Mo. (Arkansas border country) Unless your a black-belt, I wouldn't suggest telling anyone from there that 'Their not southern enough,' in any local bar.

Don't forget that there was a huge 'folk or folk rock' music movement generally prior to Southern Rock: Peter Paul and Mary, Simon and Garfunkel, Mamma's and Poppa's, Kingston Trio and if you ever caught them in a serious moment, The Smothers Brothers... Okay, well maybe not Tommy and Dickie.  ;D

CCR isn't usually considered a Southern Rock band, though they used a lot of the same elements later popularized by the Allmans and their successors did later.

Re: the Daredevils, my point isn't that they're not Southern (just look at them), it's whether they're a Southern Rock band. A lot of people would classify them that way, especially now, but their style is really country rock, after the fashion of the Eagles and the Flying Burrito Brothers, rather than the classic blues base of your typical Southern Rockers.
Do you believe that when the blue jay or another bird sings and the body is trembling, that is a signal that people are coming or something important is about to happen?

sheclown

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Re: Southern Rock
« Reply #65 on: October 31, 2012, 08:26:02 PM »
Okay, country rock and southern rock....different genres?

I'm a literature major, so forgive this analogy.  Wordsworth and Coleridge are both "romantic poets" and share common features although they have a different vibe.  It is the common elements (as well as geography and common place in history) that ties them in the genre.  This is what I think Southern Rock needs.  A definition.

I am constantly amazed that Jacksonville doesn't celebrate its Southern Rock heritage.  That's what I hope for in this exercise.  I hope that 15 year olds with borrowed guitars walk past "The Jug" and think to themselves I could change the world.

We have to show them how others have.

sheclown

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Re: Southern Rock
« Reply #66 on: October 31, 2012, 10:18:06 PM »
Allman Brothers At Fillmore East.   

First Southern Rock? 

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/0wsUNMSiIII?version=3&amp;amp;hl=en_US" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/0wsUNMSiIII?version=3&amp;amp;hl=en_US</a>

Ocklawaha

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Re: Southern Rock
« Reply #67 on: October 31, 2012, 10:38:33 PM »
CCR isn't usually considered a Southern Rock band, though they used a lot of the same elements later popularized by the Allmans and their successors did later.

Re: the Daredevils, my point isn't that they're not Southern (just look at them), it's whether they're a Southern Rock band. A lot of people would classify them that way, especially now, but their style is really country rock, after the fashion of the Eagles and the Flying Burrito Brothers, rather than the classic blues base of your typical Southern Rockers.

CCR really pioneered a fusion of Zydeco and Rock and the result was 'Swamp Music', something I'm sure most of us could enjoy. The Ozark Mountain Daredevils had quite a variety of sounds, they actually had several pieces with harmonics and instruments along the lines of 'Jessica'.

The boys from Missouri also had a classical Ozark folk flare with all sorts of nontraditional hillbilly instruments, 'Chicken Train' is one example of this really fun, or downright funny music. I especially enjoy the OMDD as they reflect my own family roots, when my late mother had her 80Th birthday virtually every member of the family was there and every instrument the OMDD's use was present, EVERYONE plays something. It really is a fun musical style and I think they handed off many ideas to the 'truer' Southern Rockers.

Adam W

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Re: Southern Rock
« Reply #68 on: November 01, 2012, 03:24:53 AM »
Okay, country rock and southern rock....different genres?

I'm a literature major, so forgive this analogy.  Wordsworth and Coleridge are both "romantic poets" and share common features although they have a different vibe.  It is the common elements (as well as geography and common place in history) that ties them in the genre.  This is what I think Southern Rock needs.  A definition.

I am constantly amazed that Jacksonville doesn't celebrate its Southern Rock heritage.  That's what I hope for in this exercise.  I hope that 15 year olds with borrowed guitars walk past "The Jug" and think to themselves I could change the world.

We have to show them how others have.




Well, being a rock band from the South and even having Southern influences or subject matter , etc doesn't necessarily make you Southern Rock. For example, no one is (thank god) claiming REM we're a Southern Rock band. Yet.

Country rock predates Southern Rock and has its roots in California (though the sound spread all over the country.... I think the aforementioned Lobo are another example). Country rock had a tendency to ease into MOR or almost easy listening territory at times, especially towards the end.

duvalbill

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Re: Southern Rock
« Reply #69 on: November 01, 2012, 09:22:09 AM »
Okay, country rock and southern rock....different genres?

I'm a literature major, so forgive this analogy.  Wordsworth and Coleridge are both "romantic poets" and share common features although they have a different vibe.  It is the common elements (as well as geography and common place in history) that ties them in the genre.  This is what I think Southern Rock needs.  A definition.

I am constantly amazed that Jacksonville doesn't celebrate its Southern Rock heritage.  That's what I hope for in this exercise.  I hope that 15 year olds with borrowed guitars walk past "The Jug" and think to themselves I could change the world.

We have to show them how others have.

They're absolutely different genres, and the "country-rock" you mention, may also reference a sub-genre known as alt-country.  The pioneers of the alt-country genre are usually considered Uncle Tupelo, although opinions differ.  You may be referencing acts such as the Flying Burrito Brothers, Gram Parsons, etc.

Alt-Country seems to be one of the fastest growing genres, and bands seem to pop up all over the place - many being spawned from punk bands.

As it relates to the current state of "southern rock," these are some of the bands I feel are continuing the tradition very well.

http://<iframe width="420" height="315" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/LptOc6OKoWs" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>
<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BSSaA7ymRhY&amp;feature=fvst" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BSSaA7ymRhY&amp;feature=fvst</a>
<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Le-3MIBxQTw" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Le-3MIBxQTw</a>
<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Vyju360XiLo" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Vyju360XiLo</a>

And if we're talking about soul, we'd be remiss to not mention Jacksonville's very own, JJ Grey and Mofro.

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CtF8P8ZSmwM" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CtF8P8ZSmwM</a>

As it relates to "country-rock" I think Ryan Bingham is doing it as well as anyone around right now.
<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jHnSj9Ls6pU" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jHnSj9Ls6pU</a>
« Last Edit: November 01, 2012, 01:46:28 PM by duvalbill »

Tacachale

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Re: Southern Rock
« Reply #70 on: November 01, 2012, 10:52:08 AM »
^Right, country rock is distinct from Southern Rock. It uses country chord progressions, song structure, instrumentation and rhythms. In contrast, your classic Southern Rock bands use a firmly blues rock base, with blues musical form and rock instrumentation (of course there are many blues rock musicians that aren't Southern Rock). Musically speaking, the Ozark Mountain Daredevils are more in line with folks like the Flying Burrito Brothers, Pure Prairie League, and the Eagles than with the Allmans, Skynyrd, or Molly Hatchet.

However, there's a lot of overlap in the styles, and some Southern Rock bands incorporate country sounds. Many people would consider the Daredevils a Southern Rock band.

And I'd agree that many modern alt country bands are carrying the Southern Rock torch. For my money the best example is Drive By Truckers, whose album Southern Rock Opera is about Skynyrd.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wrG5_2-OH8c
Do you believe that when the blue jay or another bird sings and the body is trembling, that is a signal that people are coming or something important is about to happen?

duvalbill

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Re: Southern Rock
« Reply #71 on: November 01, 2012, 11:05:29 AM »
^Right, country rock is distinct from Southern Rock. It uses country chord progressions, song structure, instrumentation and rhythms. In contrast, your classic Southern Rock bands use a firmly blues rock base, with blues musical form and rock instrumentation (of course there are many blues rock musicians that aren't Southern Rock). Musically speaking, the Ozark Mountain Daredevils are more in line with folks like the Flying Burrito Brothers, Pure Prairie League, and the Eagles than with the Allmans, Skynyrd, or Molly Hatchet.

However, there's a lot of overlap in the styles, and some Southern Rock bands incorporate country sounds. Many people would consider the Daredevils a Southern Rock band.

And I'd agree that many modern alt country bands are carrying the Southern Rock torch. For my money the best example is Drive By Truckers, whose album Southern Rock Opera is about Skynyrd.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wrG5_2-OH8c

If I could figure out how to imbed, drive-by truckers are one of the bands I posted above, as well as Jason Isbell (their former guitarist).

sheclown

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Re: Southern Rock
« Reply #72 on: November 01, 2012, 01:30:20 PM »
Here you go, Bill:

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/wrG5_2-OH8c?version=3&amp;amp;hl=en_US&quot;&gt;&lt;/param&gt;&lt;param name=&quot;allowFullScreen&quot; value=&quot;true&quot;&gt;&lt;/param&gt;&lt;param name=&quot;allowscriptaccess&quot; value=&quot;always&quot;&gt;&lt;/param&gt;&lt;embed src=&quot;http://www.youtube.com/v/wrG5_2-OH8c?version=3&amp;amp;hl=en_US" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/wrG5_2-OH8c?version=3&amp;amp;hl=en_US&quot;&gt;&lt;/param&gt;&lt;param name=&quot;allowFullScreen&quot; value=&quot;true&quot;&gt;&lt;/param&gt;&lt;param name=&quot;allowscriptaccess&quot; value=&quot;always&quot;&gt;&lt;/param&gt;&lt;embed src=&quot;http://www.youtube.com/v/wrG5_2-OH8c?version=3&amp;amp;hl=en_US</a>



Quote
Church blew up in Birmingham
Four little black girls killed for no goddamn good reason
All this hate and violence can't come to no good end
A stain on the good name.
A whole lot of good people dragged threw the blood and glass
Blood stains on their good names and all of us take the blame

Meanwhile in North Alabama, Wilson Pickett comes to town
To record that sweet soul music, to get that Muscle Shoals sound

Meanwhile in North Alabama, Aretha Franklin comes to town
To record that sweet soul music, to get that Muscle Shoals sound

And out in California, a rock star from Canada writes a couple of great songs about the
Bad shit that went down
"Southern Man" and "Alabama" certainly told some truth
But there were a lot of good folks down here and Neil Young wasn't around

Meanwhile in North Alabama, Lynyrd Skynyrd came to town
To record with Jimmy Johnson at Muscle Shoals Sound
And they met some real good people, not racist pieces of shit
And they wrote a song about it and that song became a hit

Ronnie and Neil Ronnie and Neil
Rock stars today ain't half as real
Speaking there minds on how they feel
Let them guitars blast for Ronnie and Neil

Now Ronnie and Neil became good friends their feud was just in song
Skynyrd was a bunch of Neil Young fans and Neil he loved that song
So He wrote "Powderfinger" for Skynyrd to record
But Ronnie ended up singing "Sweet Home Alabama" to the lord

And Neil helped carry Ronnie in his casket to the ground
And to my way of thinking, us southern men need both of them around

Ronnie and Neil Ronnie and Neil Rock stars today ain't half as real
Speaking their minds on how they feel
Let them guitars blast for Ronnie and Neil

sheclown

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Re: Southern Rock
« Reply #73 on: November 03, 2012, 08:43:28 AM »
Little bit of info from John Wells:

Most people don't know it but the Allman Bros. band started in Jacksonville. At one time they lived in Sherwood Forrest on the northside. There was a teen club on Soutel Dr. behind the Pic n' Sav. They used to play there. THE ALLMAN JOYS!!
WHAT A HOOT!!!


sheclown

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Re: Southern Rock
« Reply #74 on: November 03, 2012, 08:46:12 AM »
Little bit of info from John Wells:

Most people don't know it but the Allman Bros. band started in Jacksonville. At one time they lived in Sherwood Forrest on the northside. There was a teen club on Soutel Dr. behind the Pic n' Sav. They used to play there. THE ALLMAN JOYS!!
WHAT A HOOT!!!



<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/c-Dz2G9G6qM?version=3&amp;amp;hl=en_US&quot;&gt;&lt;/param&gt;&lt;param name=&quot;allowFullScreen&quot; value=&quot;true&quot;&gt;&lt;/param&gt;&lt;param name=&quot;allowscriptaccess&quot; value=&quot;always&quot;&gt;&lt;/param&gt;&lt;embed src=&quot;http://www.youtube.com/v/c-Dz2G9G6qM?version=3&amp;amp;hl=en_US" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/c-Dz2G9G6qM?version=3&amp;amp;hl=en_US&quot;&gt;&lt;/param&gt;&lt;param name=&quot;allowFullScreen&quot; value=&quot;true&quot;&gt;&lt;/param&gt;&lt;param name=&quot;allowscriptaccess&quot; value=&quot;always&quot;&gt;&lt;/param&gt;&lt;embed src=&quot;http://www.youtube.com/v/c-Dz2G9G6qM?version=3&amp;amp;hl=en_US</a>