Author Topic: Southern Rock  (Read 215820 times)

sheclown

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Re: Southern Rock
« Reply #15 on: October 26, 2012, 05:56:41 PM »
Wet Willie and Elvin Bishop.

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« Last Edit: October 28, 2012, 11:28:15 AM by sheclown »

stephenc

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Re: Southern Rock
« Reply #16 on: October 26, 2012, 07:11:02 PM »
Wet Willie and Elvin Bishop low grit factor.



Got to see Jimmy Hall from Wet Willie this past Saturday at the Morocco Shrine Auditorium. What a great show!

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Re: Southern Rock
« Reply #17 on: October 26, 2012, 07:22:53 PM »
Well, the big ones I can think of are on the list. Aside from those, I always liked "Mountain Jam" by the Allman Brothers Band. Their version of "Statesboro Blues" is classic, too.

I never used to consider the Allmans to be Southern Rock - I thought them too good and maybe a bit too early. I always considered Southern Rock to be a caricature what the Allmans did and what Lynyrd Skynyrd popularized. Like Skynyrd got huge with their sound which was "Southern" and maybe was a more mainstream version of what bands like the Allmans were doing. And then a bunch of lesser bands started cranking out poor copies of the Skynyrd sound and POOF! "Southern Rock" was born.

It's like what happened with Nirvana. (Though, technically, "grunge" existed before Nirvana... as Southern Rock probably existed before Lynyrd Skynyrd).

I find that argument... untenable. The term "Southern Rock" was popularized because of the Allman Brothers. And they weren't all that much earlier than some other notable Southern Rockers like Elvin Bishop and Wet Willie. However, they certainly weren't as "hard rock" as some of the later bands such as Skynyrd, and Skynyrd definitely dominated the course of the style after they became big.

Well, I guess the point would be that the term or the popularity or whatever blew up after the success of Skynyrd. The market became flooded, so to speak, with cheap imitations. Copies of copies of copies.

Wacca Pilatka

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Re: Southern Rock
« Reply #18 on: October 26, 2012, 07:35:24 PM »


Very last Southern Rock song?

Maybe "Keep Your Hands To Yourself"?
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Henry J. Klutho

sheclown

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Re: Southern Rock
« Reply #19 on: October 26, 2012, 07:43:01 PM »


Very last Southern Rock song?

Maybe "Keep Your Hands To Yourself"?

1986. 

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« Last Edit: October 27, 2012, 08:11:45 AM by sheclown »

sheclown

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Re: Southern Rock
« Reply #20 on: October 26, 2012, 07:47:09 PM »
First Southern Rock Song,
"Gimme Three Steps".... Skynryds first single (?) I mean arguably.
 In terms of popularity to support Tacachale, Skynryd sells a million albums a year. When in NYC, I knew several grunge players who loved Skynyd and never mentioned Allman Brothers.

Interesting story about "Gimme Three Steps"

Quote
The song is memorable for its opening riff and story of how the speaker was dancing with a girl named Linda Lou at a bar when a man, probably the girl's boyfriend or husband, enters with a gun (described as a .44) and catches them, angrily believing her to be cheating. The song's title refers to the chorus, "Won't you give me three steps/Gimme three steps mister/Gimme three steps towards the door?/Gimme three steps/Gimme three steps mister/And you'll never see me no more."[2] essentially asking for three steps head start to flee. The song is also based on a real-life experience Ronnie Van Zant had at a biker bar in Jacksonville known as The Pastime, including having a gun pulled on him, and thus inspiring him to write the lyrics on his way home.[3]

On September 22, 2012, The Pastime Bar, located at the intersection of Normandy Boulevard and Lenox Avenues (5301 Lenox Avenue, Jacksonville, Florida), walking distance from the Van Zant family home at that time, will be re-dedicated and renamed The Jug.

On September 25, 2012, it was announced that The Jug may close forever due to the lack of renovation funds and church influence from The Potters House church located on Normandy Boulevard. It is being discussed to see if The Jug can be "grandfathered" into doing business as it has been at its current location for some 40 years and the church currently occupies an old retail outlet. A petition has been started on Facebook at facebook.com/savethejug and outreach started to local entertainment who has worked with Lynyrd Skynyrd over the years for their assistance in keeping The Jug open.
Personnel

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gimme_Three_Steps

photo of "The Jug" today.




« Last Edit: October 27, 2012, 12:27:40 PM by sheclown »

sheclown

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Re: Southern Rock
« Reply #21 on: October 27, 2012, 07:41:32 AM »

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/Ep7dp1HgZnw?version=3&amp;amp;hl=en_US&quot;" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/Ep7dp1HgZnw?version=3&amp;amp;hl=en_US&quot;</a>

« Last Edit: October 29, 2012, 08:14:11 AM by sheclown »

sheclown

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Re: Southern Rock
« Reply #22 on: October 27, 2012, 08:28:59 AM »
Shinedown "Simple Kind of Man"

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2004
« Last Edit: October 27, 2012, 08:37:31 AM by sheclown »

strider

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Re: Southern Rock
« Reply #23 on: October 27, 2012, 09:05:10 AM »
After reading the posts, it just seems to me that perhaps the best way to define Southern Rock is more in the lyrics rather than the instrumentals.  Just like real country is different from folk in perhaps the same way.  Perhaps earlier it was different, but as the music evolved, the instrumentals have blended together a bit but the lyrics seem to still follow a more traditional path or theme. 

Of course, I am a bit tone death.  OK, a lot tone death. 
"My father says that almost the whole world is asleep. Everybody you know. Everybody you see. Everybody you talk to. He says that only a few people are awake and they live in a state of constant total amazement." Patrica, Joe VS the Volcano.

sheclown

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Re: Southern Rock
« Reply #24 on: October 27, 2012, 03:38:56 PM »
Is this the first "Southern Rock" song?

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"Whipping Post"
Song by The Allman Brothers Band from the album The Allman Brothers Band (studio)
At Fillmore East (live)
Released    November 4, 1969 (studio)
July 1971 (live)
Recorded    August 7, 1969 (studio)
March 13, 1971 (live)
Genre    Blues rock, Southern rock, jam
Length    5:20 (studio)
22:56 (live)
Label    Capricorn Records
Writer    Gregg Allman
Producer    Adrian Barber (studio)
Tom Dowd (live)

Quote
"Whipping Post" is a song by The Allman Brothers Band. Written by Gregg Allman, the five-minute studio version first appeared on their 1969 debut album The Allman Brothers Band. But the song's full power only manifested itself in concert, when it was the basis for much longer and more intense performances.[1][2] This was captured in a classic take on the Allman Brothers' equally classic 1971 double live album At Fillmore East,[3] where a 23-minute epic rendition takes up the entire final side.[4][5] It was this recording that garnered "Whipping Post" spots on both the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame's 500 Songs that Shaped Rock and Roll list[6] and Rolling Stone's list of "The 500 Greatest Songs of All Time".[3]

Quote
The Allman Brothers Band is an American rock/blues band once based in Macon, Georgia. The band was formed in Jacksonville, Florida, in 1969 by brothers Duane Allman (slide guitar and lead guitar) and Gregg Allman (vocals, organ, songwriting), plus Dickey Betts (lead guitar, vocals, songwriting), Berry Oakley (bass guitar), Butch Trucks (drums), and Jai Johanny "Jaimoe" Johanson (drums).[1] While the band has been called the principal architects of Southern rock,[2] they also incorporate elements of blues, jazz, and country music, and their live shows have jam band-style improvisation and instrumental songs.

Okay, experts....what do you say?
« Last Edit: October 29, 2012, 08:14:58 AM by sheclown »

sheclown

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Re: Southern Rock
« Reply #25 on: October 27, 2012, 03:42:26 PM »
Well, the big ones I can think of are on the list. Aside from those, I always liked "Mountain Jam" by the Allman Brothers Band. Their version of "Statesboro Blues" is classic, too.

I never used to consider the Allmans to be Southern Rock - I thought them too good and maybe a bit too early. I always considered Southern Rock to be a caricature what the Allmans did and what Lynyrd Skynyrd popularized. Like Skynyrd got huge with their sound which was "Southern" and maybe was a more mainstream version of what bands like the Allmans were doing. And then a bunch of lesser bands started cranking out poor copies of the Skynyrd sound and POOF! "Southern Rock" was born.

It's like what happened with Nirvana. (Though, technically, "grunge" existed before Nirvana... as Southern Rock probably existed before Lynyrd Skynyrd).

I find that argument... untenable. The term "Southern Rock" was popularized because of the Allman Brothers. And they weren't all that much earlier than some other notable Southern Rockers like Elvin Bishop and Wet Willie. However, they certainly weren't as "hard rock" as some of the later bands such as Skynyrd, and Skynyrd definitely dominated the course of the style after they became big.

Well, I guess the point would be that the term or the popularity or whatever blew up after the success of Skynyrd. The market became flooded, so to speak, with cheap imitations. Copies of copies of copies.

Adam, not copies perhaps, but inspiration?  Molly Hatchet, Blackfoot?

Adam W

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Re: Southern Rock
« Reply #26 on: October 27, 2012, 05:26:58 PM »
Well, the big ones I can think of are on the list. Aside from those, I always liked "Mountain Jam" by the Allman Brothers Band. Their version of "Statesboro Blues" is classic, too.

I never used to consider the Allmans to be Southern Rock - I thought them too good and maybe a bit too early. I always considered Southern Rock to be a caricature what the Allmans did and what Lynyrd Skynyrd popularized. Like Skynyrd got huge with their sound which was "Southern" and maybe was a more mainstream version of what bands like the Allmans were doing. And then a bunch of lesser bands started cranking out poor copies of the Skynyrd sound and POOF! "Southern Rock" was born.

It's like what happened with Nirvana. (Though, technically, "grunge" existed before Nirvana... as Southern Rock probably existed before Lynyrd Skynyrd).

I find that argument... untenable. The term "Southern Rock" was popularized because of the Allman Brothers. And they weren't all that much earlier than some other notable Southern Rockers like Elvin Bishop and Wet Willie. However, they certainly weren't as "hard rock" as some of the later bands such as Skynyrd, and Skynyrd definitely dominated the course of the style after they became big.

Well, I guess the point would be that the term or the popularity or whatever blew up after the success of Skynyrd. The market became flooded, so to speak, with cheap imitations. Copies of copies of copies.

Adam, not copies perhaps, but inspiration?  Molly Hatchet, Blackfoot?

Cheap copies!

I never really rated Molly Hatchet or Blackfoot. Pretty insipid.

.38 Special, as lame as they were, had a kind of weird, pop thing working for them. And they sort of fit in strangely alongside the new wave and stuff on MTV in the early years. I always thought they were odd because they had two drummers and sounded exactly like they had ONE DRUMMER! Like, what was the point, really? I did like a few of their songs.

Does anyone remember the "Say No To Drugs" single released by (I think) Johnny Van Zant? It didn't chart. It was done for the Nancy Reagan Say No To Drugs campaign and they played it for us in school. It wasn't very good and it wasn't Southern Rock!

sheclown

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Re: Southern Rock
« Reply #27 on: October 27, 2012, 05:57:43 PM »
Funny Story, Adam.

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/rMclpOK7a2w?version=3&amp;amp;hl=en_US" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/rMclpOK7a2w?version=3&amp;amp;hl=en_US</a>

This song from my youth is anything but insipid to me.

Quote
Blackfoot is an American Southern rock musical ensemble from Jacksonville, Florida organized during 1970. Though they are primarily a Southern rock band, they are also known as a hard rock act.[1] The band's classic lineup consisted of guitarist and vocalist Rickey Medlocke, guitarist Charlie Hargrett, bassist Greg T. Walker, and drummer Jakson Spires.

They've had a number of successful albums during the 1970s and early 1980s, including Strikes (1979), Tomcattin' (1980) and Marauder (1981).
« Last Edit: October 29, 2012, 08:15:37 AM by sheclown »

sheclown

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Re: Southern Rock
« Reply #28 on: October 27, 2012, 06:03:54 PM »
...and come on...

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/tt0Lrs_yhMI?version=3&amp;amp;hl=en_US" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/tt0Lrs_yhMI?version=3&amp;amp;hl=en_US</a>

....defined a generation  ;D

Quote
Molly Hatchet is an American southern metal band formed in Jacksonville, Florida, in 1975. They are known for their hit song "Flirtin' with Disaster" from the album of the same title. The band, founded by Dave Hlubek and Steve Holland, took its name from a prostitute who allegedly mutilated and decapitated her clients.[1] Most of Molly Hatchet album covers feature heroic fantasy inspired art, some of which were painted by artists Frank Frazetta and Boris Vallejo.[2]

« Last Edit: October 27, 2012, 07:16:45 PM by Ocklawaha »

Ocklawaha

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Re: Southern Rock
« Reply #29 on: October 27, 2012, 07:58:57 PM »
<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/GqRR3qLNAYY?version=3&amp;amp;hl=en_US" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/GqRR3qLNAYY?version=3&amp;amp;hl=en_US</a>
BLACK OAK ARKANSAS' JIM DANDY and RUBY STARR OF GREY GHOST. Jim Dandy to the rescue, was their signature song.

But of course darling, the guy with a long family history in the Ozark Mountains, has another thought on one of the greatest bands of the 1970's. Black Oak Arkansas is named after the band's hometown of Black Oak, Arkansas. During that decade, they managed to produce 10 charting albums. The band reached the height of its fame in the 1970s with ten charting albums released in that decade. Their style is punctuated by multiple guitar players and the raspy voice and on-stage antics of vocalist Jim "Dandy" Mangrum. BOA played at the famous California Jam rock festival in Ontario, California on April 6, 1974. Attracting over 200,000 fans.

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/x1FDEUEFkCI?version=3&amp;amp;hl=en_US" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/x1FDEUEFkCI?version=3&amp;amp;hl=en_US</a>
This one is based on an old Ozark Mountain folk story, it's funny as hell too.

History

The group, originally called "The Knowbody Else", was formed in 1965 in Black Oak, Arkansas, by Ronnie "Chicky Hawk" Smith (vocals), Rickie Reynolds (guitar), Stanley Knight (guitar), Harvey Jett (guitar), Pat Daugherty (bass), and Wayne Evans (drums). Their first PA system was stolen from Monette high school. Members of the group were subsequently charged in absentia with grand larceny and sentenced to 26 years at the Tucker Prison Farm (this sentence was later suspended). This led to their retreat to the hills of rural northcentral Arkansas where they lived off the land and refined their musical style.[1] They also lived in Long Beach, Mississippi and played at the local Lobe theater/dance hall and the short-lived venue, "The Black Rainbow." Some of their influences during this time were the Beatles and the Byrds. At some point the band and Ronnie "Chicky Hawk" Smith agreed that a mutual friend named James "Jim Dandy" Mangrum would make a better front man, Ronnie Smith agreed that he would make a better stage production manager.

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/jVDjZaIlJ24?version=3&amp;amp;hl=en_US" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/jVDjZaIlJ24?version=3&amp;amp;hl=en_US</a>
BOA lighting up DIXIE, and the South has never been the same since.