The Jaxson

Urban Thinking => Analysis => Topic started by: Metro Jacksonville on July 16, 2010, 04:12:46 AM

Title: 2030 Mobility Plan: Development Zones
Post by: Metro Jacksonville on July 16, 2010, 04:12:46 AM
2030 Mobility Plan: Development Zones

(http://photos.metrojacksonville.com/photos/832382761_Dtfru-M.jpg)

To ensure the creation of a successful multimodal transportation network, the incorporation of complementing land use objectives is a critical objective. Since our community is diverse in terms of neighborhood characteristics, age, building fabric, population density and needs, a location-based approach to integrating mobility and land use is imperative.

Today Metro Jacksonville takes a look at the 2030 Mobility Plan's proposed location-based Land Use and Transportation Connection areas, which are described as "Development Zones"


Full Article
http://www.metrojacksonville.com/article/2010-jul-2030-mobility-plan-development-zones
Title: Re: 2030 Mobility Plan: Development Zones
Post by: Doctor_K on July 16, 2010, 08:37:05 AM
So is this going to be adopted/looked at by the right people, or is this another (brilliantly done) MJ OpEd piece?

One would hope for the former...
Title: Re: 2030 Mobility Plan: Development Zones
Post by: thelakelander on July 16, 2010, 10:22:57 AM
The former. It's being evaulated right now by the city.
Title: Re: 2030 Mobility Plan: Development Zones
Post by: Doctor_K on July 16, 2010, 02:16:03 PM
Outstanding.
Title: Re: 2030 Mobility Plan: Development Zones
Post by: Captain Zissou on July 16, 2010, 02:25:09 PM
Does this plan have any teeth that will prevent sprawl, or is it another study that will get tossed aside?
Title: Re: 2030 Mobility Plan: Development Zones
Post by: fsujax on July 16, 2010, 02:46:02 PM
This plan will hopefully be the funding mechanism that is so badly needed for streetcars.
Title: Re: 2030 Mobility Plan: Development Zones
Post by: thelakelander on July 16, 2010, 03:49:58 PM
Does this plan have any teeth that will prevent sprawl, or is it another study that will get tossed aside?

Here are the teeth.  

Quote
Florida's Community Renewal Act (Senate Bill 360, SB 360), adopted in 2009, amended the Growth Management Act by removing state-mandated transportation concurrency requirements in areas designated as Transportation Concurrency Exception Areas or TCEAs.  Resulting from the definition of a "dense urban land area" or DULA provided within SB 360, the City of Jacksonville has been designated a TCEA. As outlined in Senate Bill 360, within two years after a TCEA becomes effective, local governments are required to amend their local comprehensive plans to include "land use and transportation strategies to support and fund mobility within the exception area, including alternative modes of transportation."

Local comprehensive plans must also comply with 163.3177, F.S., which requires the adoption of strategies to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and promote energy-efficient land use patterns. Pursuant to SB 360 and 163.3177, F.S., the City of Jacksonville Planning and Development Department has prepared a draft 2030 Mobility Plan.  

There are two chief components to the mobility planning approach, the draft 2030 Mobility Plan and the supporting 2030 Multimodal Transportation Study (January 2010). The purpose of this dual approach is to build upon existing policies through the adoption of land use and transportation policies that support mobility, in partnership with the effective application of a new transportation improvement and mitigation funding mechanism.

http://www.coj.net/Departments/Planning+and+Development/Community+Planning/Mobility+Plan.htm

You can't achieve any of the goals above by pushing the same unsustainable type of infrastructure solutions we've been selling our souls to for the last 50 years.
Title: Re: 2030 Mobility Plan: Development Zones
Post by: lewyn on July 16, 2010, 05:00:20 PM
None of this looks like "teeth" to me.  A city or county can issue plans screaming to high heaven about how they plan to reduce greenhouse gases, but then when you read the fine print its back to the same old Outer Beltways and road widenings. 
Title: Re: 2030 Mobility Plan: Development Zones
Post by: thelakelander on July 16, 2010, 06:00:44 PM
Except two things. 

1.) This is a state mandate, not something cooked up locally.

2.) Outer Beltways and road widenings don't reduce greenhouse gas emissions, diversify transportation modes or support sustainable land uses.  Thus, such a single focused plan does not comply with the goals of SB 360. 

With that said, people claim they want change.  This seems like a pretty good opportunity to put our money where our mouth's are.
Title: Re: 2030 Mobility Plan: Development Zones
Post by: tufsu1 on July 16, 2010, 07:47:15 PM
There are lots of things in state statute that get ignored....for example, the outer beltway is already shown in local comp. plans so the new greenhouse gas rules won't effect it much.

I'm concerned that the cost differential in the Mobility Plan between the urban core areas and the rural fringe isn't enough to truly encourage infill development....that said, I've also heard that developers think the mobility fees are too high...so time will tell.

I met with FDOT central Office staff today in Tallahassee....they are well aware of Jax.'s proposed plan...and want to use it as a model for other areas around the state
Title: Re: 2030 Mobility Plan: Development Zones
Post by: thelakelander on July 16, 2010, 07:55:19 PM
Although nothing is set in stone, my guess is that it will pass in some form.  That alone is a huge accomplishment for our community.  My hope is that the transit, bike and ped projects don't get taken or bumped out of the initial five year plan.
Title: Re: 2030 Mobility Plan: Development Zones
Post by: Fallen Buckeye on July 17, 2010, 02:28:48 PM
Can you explain what a mobility fee is?
Title: Re: 2030 Mobility Plan: Development Zones
Post by: tufsu1 on July 17, 2010, 02:48:46 PM
A mobility fee is a fee assessed to new development to mitigate its traffic impacts...in the case of Jax, it will be based on the number of new trips and the average distance of those trips (that's what the zones are for)....right now, the plan proposes a fee of about $400-$600 per daily trip depending on location.

For comparison, a single family house generates about 10 trips/day...so the mobility fee in the urban zones would be around $4,000

A shopping center generates about 40 trips/day per 1000 square feet...so a 50,000 square foot grocery store in the urban zones would pay about $800,000
Title: Re: 2030 Mobility Plan: Development Zones
Post by: heights unknown on July 17, 2010, 03:10:01 PM
http://photos.metrojacksonville.com/Transit/Jacksonville-2030-Mobility/Executive-Summary-FiguresPage4/827039031_ycPBN-M.jpg

Assuming that the area in green in the above photo is the present populated area of the so called "urban" area of the City, does anyone know what the population is in that area?  I know we would probably have to make a population count of all zip code areas to come to a close, near accurate figure, but if anyone knows, please let me know.  Great post y'all.

Assuming that if we had not consolidated, and Jax would have annexed most or all of the area in green, whatever the population is in that area is probably what our "city proper" population would be today.

"HU"
Title: Re: 2030 Mobility Plan: Development Zones
Post by: Fallen Buckeye on July 17, 2010, 03:51:20 PM
Thanks. That's about what I thought it might be. Sounds like a good idea. Especially if this were paired with smart zoning and build code regulations.

A mobility fee is a fee assessed to new development to mitigate its traffic impacts...in the case of Jax, it will be based on the number of new trips and the average distance of those trips (that's what the zones are for)....right now, the plan proposes a fee of about $400-$600 per daily trip depending on location.

For comparison, a single family house generates about 10 trips/day...so the mobility fee in the urban zones would be around $4,000

A shopping center generates about 40 trips/day per 1000 square feet...so a 50,000 square foot grocery store in the urban zones would pay about $800,000
Title: Re: 2030 Mobility Plan: Development Zones
Post by: ricker on December 16, 2010, 08:34:23 PM
so much to absorb...
anyone out there know for certain as of late, if the bike/ped portion of the 2030plan will actually kick off to completion within these next 5 years? by 2015?

I have reports and and an overlay to finish drafting.. .

HELP (with facts_no speculation_no teasing please)
Title: Re: 2030 Mobility Plan: Development Zones
Post by: Ocklawaha on December 16, 2010, 08:57:12 PM
To completion? Maybe not, but well under way? If this is approved without some yahoo's cutting the hell out of it, then it's a given that funding will be in place and steps toward construction could began almost immediately. Remember that SB360 DOES NOT leave much wiggle room for the tire-hugger's to hide behind.

BTW, If you are drawing official plans, PLEASE look into the Pottsburg Creek - Julington Creek Greenway and trail that was proposed by Lakelander? MJ? Anyway it might just be the single best idea for bikes and pedestrians the Southside of the city has ever had.


OCKLAWAHA
Title: Re: 2030 Mobility Plan: Development Zones
Post by: ricker on December 17, 2010, 02:32:47 PM
thank you!
I will!
I love homework.
Title: Re: 2030 Mobility Plan: Development Zones
Post by: north miami on December 17, 2010, 02:58:47 PM
Does this plan have any teeth that will prevent sprawl, or is it another study that will get tossed aside?

Pivotal events during the mid-late 90's and early 2000 -all upfront under the heading and guise of "Growth Mamanagement" will assure 'sprawl'.The 2030 Plan incorporates the decisions and features of that era.

Our recent furious glares at evil Central Florida during water wars were myopic.
Title: Re: 2030 Mobility Plan: Development Zones
Post by: Ocklawaha on December 17, 2010, 03:45:52 PM
This plan makes it more expensive to build farther out then close in. It incorporates none of the previous thought was was 100% SPRAWL based, and in fact was drawn with huge input from MetroJacksonville and its readers. Do tell North Miami, just what parts of it are in fact found per your statement, "The 2030 Plan incorporates the decisions and features of that era."

REALLY?


OCKLAWAHA
Title: Re: 2030 Mobility Plan: Development Zones
Post by: north miami on December 17, 2010, 05:05:24 PM
[b

 Do tell North Miami, just what parts of it are in fact found per your statement, "The 2030 Plan incorporates the decisions and features of that era."

REALLY?[/b]

OCKLAWAHA


?????  Are you kidding??
MJ forum becomming fuzzy-

Not the Mobility Plan per se
My comments were to the comment abvout limiting future 'sprawl. and my point is that we have committed.

SW Duval County Brannon/Chaffee  The westward leap frog over Little Black Creek belt is classic sprawl. Beltway.Key events included Mayor Delaney's nudge for approval of the DOT Brannon Chaffee permit application for what was widely acknowledged to be the first leg of the Beltway.I could go on but there is no point.

Title: Re: 2030 Mobility Plan: Development Zones
Post by: CS Foltz on December 17, 2010, 05:37:13 PM
north miami...........I agree with you! The stepping stones for sprawl are being put into place! The 9A extension is one part and the Beltway is slowly coming into fruition........not good over the long haul I would think!
Title: Re: 2030 Mobility Plan: Development Zones
Post by: tufsu1 on December 17, 2010, 07:55:09 PM
but wait...some of you live in sprawl!
Title: Re: 2030 Mobility Plan: Development Zones
Post by: Ocklawaha on December 17, 2010, 08:38:05 PM
Who lives in SPRAWL TU... Hell, we're building our own live-work-play city out here in the sticks... hee hee!  i don't think WGV, SAWGRASS, NOCATEE or PALENCIA communities are the problem as much as the quick tract developers that slap 300 homes up without anything but the minimum supporting infrastructure.

OCKLAWAHA

http://www.youtube.com/v/p_B0jVO4cvA?fs=1&hl=en_US

Title: Re: 2030 Mobility Plan: Development Zones
Post by: Ernest Street on December 17, 2010, 08:46:11 PM
I hate to sound retro in this thread,But I happen to live in the Historic 5-Points neighborhood that was a strong CORE part of the downtown link after the Great Fire.I am Riverside.
We had to swallow this enlargement of I-10 for the sake of progress..now our neighborhood is enveloped in this LOUD snarling ribbon of freeway so folks can conveniently get to the Southside or Northside. We watched 60 foot concrete towers make shadows on a former street car line road (Margaret st) and we haven't gotten those sound barrier walls that you see on I-95
This incorporation of our County has not been good to anyone.  Just stretching things too thin..
To those that cut through our neighborhood in your daily commute..please take the Monster expressway.
If you use Post or College, please put your exhaust from your V-8 Trucks and SUV'S on the expressway!
When it's foggy around here the carbon Monoxide from your Soccer Mama Pick-up or  Explorer is Choking us! :P
It blows in 4 blocks and settles around our windows...
Does everyone in this town HAVE to drive a HUGE V-8 Pick-up? Kinda funny watching tiny men and woman try to drive such Huge vehicles..Yea this is you if the shoe fits.

Title: Re: 2030 Mobility Plan: Development Zones
Post by: Charles Hunter on December 17, 2010, 09:37:49 PM
Sprawl?  I have heard there is a 500+ acre development going thru the process out near Maxville.  Will the Mobility Fee disincentivize this, or are they getting in before it becomes effective?
Title: Re: 2030 Mobility Plan: Development Zones
Post by: dougskiles on December 18, 2010, 08:13:11 AM
I'm concerned that the cost differential in the Mobility Plan between the urban core areas and the rural fringe isn't enough to truly encourage infill development....that said, I've also heard that developers think the mobility fees are too high...so time will tell.

I was very concerned about this too when I first read the plan because the difference is only about 25% which may not be quite enough to make a significant difference.  However, there is an adjustment to the fee which I believe may lead to a more significant change:

From the 2030 Multimodal Transportation Study:
Quote
The developer will benefit from locating a new project within a half mile of established jobs, shopping, transit, bicycle and pedestrian facilities by receiving the following trip adjustment measures.
Title: Re: 2030 Mobility Plan: Development Zones
Post by: dougskiles on December 18, 2010, 08:15:02 AM
For comparison, a single family house generates about 10 trips/day...so the mobility fee in the urban zones would be around $4,000

The numbers that we heard in the presentation were based on $24/VMT, so the single family home fee would be $2400.
Title: Re: 2030 Mobility Plan: Development Zones
Post by: tufsu1 on December 18, 2010, 09:03:52 AM
correct....the fee was reduced from $51 to $24 through the task force review process
Title: Re: 2030 Mobility Plan: Development Zones
Post by: ricker on December 20, 2010, 12:48:19 AM
I hate to sound retro in this thread,But I happen to live in the Historic 5-Points neighborhood that was a strong CORE part of the downtown link after the Great Fire.I am Riverside.
We had to swallow this enlargement of I-10 for the sake of progress..now our neighborhood is enveloped in this LOUD snarling ribbon of freeway so folks can conveniently get to the Southside or Northside. We watched 60 foot concrete towers make shadows on a former street car line road (Margaret st) and we haven't gotten those sound barrier walls that you see on I-95
This incorporation of our County has not been good to anyone.  Just stretching things too thin..
To those that cut through our neighborhood in your daily commute..please take the Monster expressway.
If you use Post or College, please put your exhaust from your V-8 Trucks and SUV'S on the expressway!
When it's foggy around here the carbon Monoxide from your Soccer Mama Pick-up or  Explorer is Choking us! :P
It blows in 4 blocks and settles around our windows...
Does everyone in this town HAVE to drive a HUGE V-8 Pick-up? Kinda funny watching tiny men and woman try to drive such Huge vehicles..Yea this is you if the shoe fits.



AMENAMENAMENAMENAMENAMEAMENAMENAMENAMENAMEN

x infinity.

Thank you neighbor for your bellyachin'
Title: Re: 2030 Mobility Plan: Development Zones
Post by: ricker on December 27, 2010, 04:07:31 AM
though hammering the accelerator up the ramp from Irene to 17, crossing what feels like an acre square of road width as you see people look on with amazement from within your rearview at the speed with which you adroitly launch yourself clear out of their way slicing down and off, politely using your turnsignal for what may seem a forgetful eternity to others, but negating their attempt to edge you off as you were previously side by side for a few car laengths .. . is awesome.
"is that a turbodiesel? "

Title: Re: 2030 Mobility Plan: Development Zones
Post by: Charles Hunter on December 27, 2010, 09:50:58 AM
WTF?