The Jaxson

Jacksonville by Neighborhood => Urban Neighborhoods => Topic started by: thelakelander on February 18, 2019, 09:11:58 AM

Title: Vintage Photos: Sugar Hill
Post by: thelakelander on February 18, 2019, 09:11:58 AM
Quote
(https://photos.metrojacksonville.com/photos/3853588592_JwX4DPQ-L.jpg)

Largely razed as a result of mid-20th century discriminatory practices, Sugar Hill was Jim Crow era black Jacksonville's version of upscale inner city living.

Full article: https://www.thejaxsonmag.com/article/vintage-photos-sugar-hill/
Title: Re: Vintage Photos: Sugar Hill
Post by: sandyshoes on February 18, 2019, 10:42:24 AM
Congratulations, Ennis Davis, on another pictorial essay (I could read these for hours).  I know you are published, but I would love to see a handsome "coffee table book" of Black Jacksonville History...and you would be the perfect person to head a Black Jacksonville Historical Society.  (because there's not one - yet!)  I would love to know a lot more about the Sugar Hill residents. 
Title: Re: Vintage Photos: Sugar Hill
Post by: thelakelander on February 18, 2019, 10:59:23 AM
Thanks! A coffee table style black Jacksonville book?! Sounds interesting. Perhaps one day! Stay tuned. I do plan to share more about the history, businesses and accomplishments of various individuals. However, there's so much history out there, it would be better shared as a series of separate stories.
Title: Re: Vintage Photos: Sugar Hill
Post by: Adam White on February 18, 2019, 11:03:58 AM
Not trying to be melodramatic, but reading articles like this brings cultural genocide to mind. Very sad.
Title: Re: Vintage Photos: Sugar Hill
Post by: thelakelander on February 18, 2019, 11:19:38 AM
True but the other side of it is that we have to know, understand and accept the past to plan for a better future. While much of Sugar Hill has been lost, some parts of it still remain. These areas can certainly become a part of a revitalized neighborhood's future, while the moonscape created from failed urban renewal can serve as land for infill development.
Title: Re: Vintage Photos: Sugar Hill
Post by: Steve on February 18, 2019, 11:24:10 AM
Yea, it's really unreal the placement of the highways. I realize that realistically they were going to be going somewhere, but I feel like if we gave a damn about our citizens and didn't try to destroy neighborhoods just because the residents weren't white people, we could have figured out a less crappy place to put them.
Title: Re: Vintage Photos: Sugar Hill
Post by: Steve on February 18, 2019, 11:46:04 AM
On that note...lakelander....if you were a city planner in the late 1940s/early 1950s and you knew that what is now 90 and 10 were coming but you could place them in a better location, where would you put them?
Title: Re: Vintage Photos: Sugar Hill
Post by: thelakelander on February 18, 2019, 12:08:08 PM
Highways were purposely used as a tool to get rid of areas viewed as blight, so in many cases, the selected routes were certainly intentional. So probably right along a railroad line, meaning you'd end up with a Hart Bridge type viaduct through industrial areas, on the edge of the developed city at the time or allowing streets to become congested and focusing on other forms of mobility within the central city.
Title: Re: Vintage Photos: Sugar Hill
Post by: Steve on February 18, 2019, 12:30:28 PM
Highways were purposely used as a tool to get rid of areas viewed as blight, so in many cases, the selected routes were certainly intentional. So probably right along a railroad line, meaning you'd end up with a Hart Bridge type viaduct through industrial areas, on the edge of the developed city at the time or allowing streets to become congested and focusing on other forms of mobility within the central city.

The rail thing does make sense, since the neighborhoods grew up around the rail lines. Not that anyone is moving I-95 anytime soon; more just curious the thought.
Title: Re: Vintage Photos: Sugar Hill
Post by: thelakelander on February 18, 2019, 12:35:48 PM
I-95, the Jax Expressway Authority part between the Trout River and Gilmore Street, was purposely constructed to take out those areas. If you align that route with a racial demographic map at the time, you can easily see how it served as a racial divider line that also happened to take out some of the healthiest minority areas and public spaces. They say if you're not at the table, you're probably the meal. That pretty much was the case of black Jax during the 1940s and 50s.
Title: Re: Vintage Photos: Sugar Hill
Post by: Charles Hunter on February 18, 2019, 02:09:09 PM
One of the first transportation / urban planning books I bought was Helen Leavitt's "Superhighway - Superhoax" (1970). One of the themes is just what thelakelander stated, that the Interstates and other urban expressways were located to either divide "white" neighborhoods from "black" ones; or to just remove black neighborhoods. In the 1950s and 1960s when much of this took place, African-Americans had little political power in most cities.  It was abuses like this that led to the requirement for more public involvement in highway planning, including a demonstration that minority neighborhoods were not bearing a disproportionate share of the negative effects of highway construction.
Title: Re: Vintage Photos: Sugar Hill
Post by: Kiva on February 18, 2019, 03:58:48 PM
Thanks! A coffee table style black Jacksonville book?! Sounds interesting. Perhaps one day! Stay tuned. I do plan to share more about the history, businesses and accomplishments of various individuals. However, there's so much history out there, it would be better shared as a series of separate stories.
Easy. Each story is one chapter. Problem solved!
Title: Re: Vintage Photos: Sugar Hill
Post by: Wacca Pilatka on February 18, 2019, 05:09:20 PM
Is there or will there be a photo essay on the site highlighting historic Sugar Hill buildings and parks that remain?  Thanks!
Title: Re: Vintage Photos: Sugar Hill
Post by: Bill Hoff on February 18, 2019, 05:25:44 PM
Groundwork Jacksonville will be unveiling their very large, very cool mosiac tribute to the Sugar Hill neighborhood underneath I-95 on March 23rd. It'll rival the river mosiac (underneath the Main Street bridge on the Southbank) as the "best" one in Jax, made by the same artist, Roux Art.

Check it out:
https://www.facebook.com/events/2018916171740007/?ti=as