The Jaxson

Jacksonville by Neighborhood => Downtown => Topic started by: Metro Jacksonville on December 14, 2011, 03:07:49 AM

Title: Downtown's Proposed Sustainability Resource Center
Post by: Metro Jacksonville on December 14, 2011, 03:07:49 AM
Downtown's Proposed Sustainability Resource Center

(http://photos.metrojacksonville.com/photos/1630521877_XF44BGB-M.jpg)

Metro Jacksonville shares the presentation of the proposed Sustainability Resource Center recently given to the Downtown Development Review Board (DDRB).  The Sustainability Resource Center will occupy a long-vacant parking garage storefront on West Duval Street near the public library.

Full Article
http://www.metrojacksonville.com/article/2011-dec-downtowns-proposed-sustainability-resource-center
Title: Re: Downtown's Proposed Sustainability Resource Center
Post by: Noone on December 14, 2011, 05:14:20 AM
I want to be a 501-c

Is Chelsea St. on McCoys Creek ahead of the curve in adoption of green development practices? Which part of the Public/Private Partnership is this? Brooklyn Park is close.

Looking forward to participating and learning more. This sounds like a Downtown Destination that I would visit. 
Title: Re: Downtown's Proposed Sustainability Resource Center
Post by: Non-RedNeck Westsider on December 14, 2011, 08:14:51 AM
My political statement of the day that goes out to all engineers, architects and designers:  When thinking green, think 'lots of wood' in your future designs - Trees. The original renewable resource!
Title: Re: Downtown's Proposed Sustainability Resource Center
Post by: urbaknight on December 14, 2011, 11:57:17 AM
I like this idea and hope it can achieve all of the goals listed above. The greatest challenge is to get the ignorant segment of the population (which unfortunately is most people in JAX) on board with it's mission.
Title: Re: Downtown's Proposed Sustainability Resource Center
Post by: Timkin on December 14, 2011, 12:10:13 PM
I Like it as well.  +1
Title: Re: Downtown's Proposed Sustainability Resource Center
Post by: dougskiles on December 14, 2011, 01:46:02 PM
The greatest challenge is to get the ignorant segment of the population (which unfortunately is most people in JAX) on board with it's mission.

That and we become an attractive place to live for those who value sustainability and those other voices get smaller.
Title: Re: Downtown's Proposed Sustainability Resource Center
Post by: Coolyfett on December 14, 2011, 02:14:37 PM
In Jacksonville????? Ill believe it when I see it....
Title: Re: Downtown's Proposed Sustainability Resource Center
Post by: jerry cornwell on December 14, 2011, 02:26:30 PM
In Jacksonville????? Ill believe it when I see it....
Hear! Hear! Too little, too late!
Title: Re: Downtown's Proposed Sustainability Resource Center
Post by: Non-RedNeck Westsider on December 14, 2011, 02:33:33 PM
I can't speak for other trades, but LEED in division 6 is a joke.

Title: Re: Downtown's Proposed Sustainability Resource Center
Post by: dougskiles on December 14, 2011, 02:39:28 PM
In what way?  Too easy, too expensive?

I deal mostly with division 2 and it does a good job of promoting less irrigation and less stormwater pollution.  The problem we (civil engineers) run into is that the state codes are so prescriptive that we don't have much room for innovative solutions.
Title: Re: Downtown's Proposed Sustainability Resource Center
Post by: Non-RedNeck Westsider on December 14, 2011, 03:39:45 PM
In what way?  Too easy, too expensive?

I deal mostly with division 2 and it does a good job of promoting less irrigation and less stormwater pollution.  The problem we (civil engineers) run into is that the state codes are so prescriptive that we don't have much room for innovative solutions.

First, 95% of any US sourced lumber is coming from a mill recognized by the National Hardwood Lumber Association (NHLA) and they all require each producer to maintain a certain level of reforestation with most already exceeding the requirement for business' sake.  Just because it's certified by the Forestry Stewardship Council (FSC Cert) doesn't mean that they are doing anything differently, just paying a yearly fee to maintain their CofC certificates.  On a side note, if the shop supplying the products are not FSC members, then the product supplied isn't, even if it came from the proper source.

Secondly, the majority of your engineered products, Corian, Zodiaq, 3-Form, Lumicor all have SOME recycled content, but even so, the processes that are used to fabricate them are typically more harmful than not.  Not to mention the 'recycled' parts are the scraps from the fabrication process for their non-LEED products.  They are charging more to use the stuff they would throw away anyhow.  Genius.

Thirdly, due to our location, we rarely receive any of the credits for locally sourced products.  The majority of your countertop materials and laminates come from New York & Canada.  The majority of hardwoods comes from the midwest.  And you're acrylic products come from either Washington or Cincinnati.  I've never been able to claim that credit in all of the jobs I've done.

Nutshell Version:  It costs us more to maintain a certification that we don't need; to use 'recycled' products that really aren't; shipped to us from places that aren't close enough to matter; to install for a project that probably won't even properly check to begin with.  LEED projects are supposed to be verified by a third party.
Title: Re: Downtown's Proposed Sustainability Resource Center
Post by: Jason on December 15, 2011, 02:11:15 PM
The most common credits I've claimed on various projects all pertain to energy effeciency and control of lighting (division 16).  These, to me, are meaningful investments and despite the up front costs, have a measurable payback.  When daylight harvesting, occupancy sensors or building control systems, and high effeciency/low maintenance fixtures are implemented its almost always a win for the building owners.

On the other hand, the process of applying for a LEED certification uses more paper and ink than half of DC in a year!!!  Damn what a wast and a beurocratic nightmare.  The fact is that we can get just as much environmental and economic benefit by simply tightening our building codes.
Title: Re: Downtown's Proposed Sustainability Resource Center
Post by: crwjax on January 07, 2012, 01:55:45 PM
This is awesome; and good news for the city.  Maybe at some point the ivy (or whatever is supposed to be growing on that building) can be this-->  http://solarivy.com/
Looks like a great concept with many partners!
Title: Re: Downtown's Proposed Sustainability Resource Center
Post by: joshuataylor on January 11, 2014, 02:36:29 PM
Any news on this project? Have we lost it completely? The banners still hang inside the space, but it's been quiet for what seems like too long.
Title: Re: Downtown's Proposed Sustainability Resource Center
Post by: Noone on January 11, 2014, 11:21:34 PM
^Probably waiting for lollipop money like everyone else. DIA Board meeting 4 days out.