Author Topic: Distinguish Jacksonville: Asa Philip Randolph  (Read 2221 times)

Metro Jacksonville

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Distinguish Jacksonville: Asa Philip Randolph
« on: September 03, 2007, 04:00:00 AM »
Distinguish Jacksonville: Asa Philip Randolph



Sometimes we forget the influence and role many former Jacksonville residents have played in shaping the society we live in today.  Raised in Jacksonville, Asa Philip Randolph (1889-1979) was a prominent 20th century African-American Civil Rights leader and founder of the first black labor union in the United States.

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http://www.metrojacksonville.com/content/view/460

rebelyell

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Re: Distinguish Jacksonville: Asa Philip Randolph
« Reply #1 on: September 10, 2007, 11:12:04 PM »
Unfortunantely, this ballpark is not in the best part of town.

Coolyfett

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Re: Distinguish Jacksonville: Asa Philip Randolph
« Reply #2 on: January 24, 2008, 07:05:11 PM »
Hmmmmmmmmmmm
Mike Hogan Destruction Eruption!

Lunican

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Re: Distinguish Jacksonville: Asa Philip Randolph
« Reply #3 on: April 06, 2009, 10:07:06 AM »
Quote
The Last Pullman Porters Are Sought for a Tribute

For more than a century, Pullman porters were a part of American train travel, until competition from planes and automobiles led to the decline of sleeper cars. Now the last generation of porters — who played a critical role in African-American history — is rapidly dying off. And Amtrak is attempting to locate the last few for National Train Day.

In 2001, the A. Philip Randolph Museum compiled a national registry of black railroad employees who worked from the late 1800s to 1969, a record that could be useful for historians and genealogists.

“There are a thousand people on this list — as we mark it up, it’s not looking like the same list anymore,” said Hank Ernest, who is coordinating the publicity for Amtrak. Asked how many they had found, he said, “Double digits.”

Full Article:
http://www.nytimes.com/2009/04/04/us/04porters.html