Author Topic: Urban Neighborhoods: The Historic Downtown Core  (Read 5022 times)

Metro Jacksonville

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Urban Neighborhoods: The Historic Downtown Core
« on: June 01, 2010, 04:01:29 AM »
Urban Neighborhoods: The Historic Downtown Core



The preservation of historic building fabric is essential to understanding our community's heritage, smart growth, and community walkability. With this in mind, Metro Jacksonville takes a look at the city's most unique historic environment: The walkable Downtown Core.

Full Article
http://www.metrojacksonville.com/article/2010-jun-urban-neighborhoods-the-historic-downtown-core

JeffreyS

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Re: Urban Neighborhoods: The Historic Downtown Core
« Reply #1 on: June 01, 2010, 08:41:54 AM »
Great pictorial.
Lenny Smash

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Re: Urban Neighborhoods: The Historic Downtown Core
« Reply #2 on: June 01, 2010, 08:58:25 AM »
Great history lesson and a good wealth of information as always.

vicupstate

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Re: Urban Neighborhoods: The Historic Downtown Core
« Reply #3 on: June 01, 2010, 09:17:02 AM »
Another advantage to renovation vs. new construction is that with renovation, MORE of the FUNDS STAY LOCAL.  New construction is largely spent on materials, the majority of are manufactured elsewhere.  Renovation, is much more LABOR intensive, which is going to come from the immediate area.  

New floor tiles might be coming from Washington state, but the worker that restores an old tile floor is not going to be from Washington state, but will usually live within 50 miles. The money that is spent locally can 'turn over' again, whereas the money sent to Washington State won't be turning over locally, but there instead.      
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heights unknown

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Re: Urban Neighborhoods: The Historic Downtown Core
« Reply #4 on: June 01, 2010, 11:12:30 AM »
Good stuff to know.  There's not many historic buildings left downtown, but, it's good to know a little about the history and background of the one's that are left.  Great pics too.

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Captain Zissou

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Re: Urban Neighborhoods: The Historic Downtown Core
« Reply #5 on: June 01, 2010, 11:22:41 AM »
Great shots.  I love the Elks building, glad it made the cover shot.  We have some great buildings already downtown, we just need to enhance their utility. 

tufsu1

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Re: Urban Neighborhoods: The Historic Downtown Core
« Reply #6 on: June 01, 2010, 12:49:05 PM »
There's not many historic buildings left downtown, but, it's good to know a little about the history and background of the one's that are left.

I disagree....while many of our older buildings have been knocked down, I think the pictorial shows that there is still a rich tapestry (some might even say a plethora) of historic buildings downtown.

Debbie Thompson

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Re: Urban Neighborhoods: The Historic Downtown Core
« Reply #7 on: June 01, 2010, 12:57:52 PM »
Little known fun fact.  There's a dead-end alley on Forsyth between the old Barnett Building at 100 Laura Street and the Atlantic Bank Building.  Why?  It was an easement for a carriage house that had belonged to a residence that sat on that block at one time.  When they were building the Barnett building, the easement could not be cleared, and it therefore could not be built upon.  It sits vacant waiting for a horse and carriage that will never arrive. :-)

Joe

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Re: Urban Neighborhoods: The Historic Downtown Core
« Reply #8 on: June 01, 2010, 01:08:40 PM »
tufsu1, I have to disagree. There's no "rich tapestry" left - just a few limited reminders that desperately need to be preserved. The vast vast majority of significant structures have already been demolished. (Take a look at the "Jacksonville's Architectural Heritage" book.)

I would agree with the statement that there are still enough historic buildings to warrant a downtown historic district. What little we have left should be celebrated. However, I don't think we should gloss over the fact that downtown's historic remainders are merely a sad shell of an architectural treasure-trove that used to be as big as Savannah or Charleston.

(Just to be clear. I don't wish to belittle the valuable preservation efforts that have been successful. The Planning Department's "Local Landmark" program has preserved most of the buildings listed on Lakelander's fantastic photo tour. So at least the majority of the survivors aren't going anywhere. )
« Last Edit: June 01, 2010, 01:14:33 PM by Joe »

stjr

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Re: Urban Neighborhoods: The Historic Downtown Core
« Reply #9 on: June 01, 2010, 01:35:02 PM »
Great pictorial inventory of what's left in Jax.  Everyone of these "survivors" needs to remain and the City's leadership will be important to doing that.

All of these buildings are loaded with character, quality, craftsmanship, and history just not found in modern buildings anymore.  They are irreplaceable and the loss of each one is an irrevocable diminishment of our community.  As mentioned, they are so unique that they are capable of ATTRACTING activity to them if properly preserved and respected.  Certainly, no suburban development can match what these structures offer.  If Downtown loses these buildings, it will no longer be "special", just an over-sized office park by the river.

My favorite among them is the Greenleaf although it's like trying to pick your favorite child.

I gave Ted Pappas grief on La Villa but will give him an "atta boy" on the project cited (below).  Now, if he could repeat this process over and over....

Hey!  Whatever happened to just plain ol' COMMON SENSE!!

Wacca Pilatka

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Re: Urban Neighborhoods: The Historic Downtown Core
« Reply #10 on: June 01, 2010, 01:36:16 PM »
Little known fun fact.  There's a dead-end alley on Forsyth between the old Barnett Building at 100 Laura Street and the Atlantic Bank Building.  Why?  It was an easement for a carriage house that had belonged to a residence that sat on that block at one time.  When they were building the Barnett building, the easement could not be cleared, and it therefore could not be built upon.  It sits vacant waiting for a horse and carriage that will never arrive. :-)

Thanks for sharing this story!
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Re: Urban Neighborhoods: The Historic Downtown Core
« Reply #11 on: June 01, 2010, 02:14:02 PM »
The Morocco Temple is my favorite, seem like there should lighted torches on top and hidden treasure inside.

jbroadglide

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Re: Urban Neighborhoods: The Historic Downtown Core
« Reply #12 on: June 01, 2010, 02:59:01 PM »
Little known fun fact.  There's a dead-end alley on Forsyth between the old Barnett Building at 100 Laura Street and the Atlantic Bank Building.  Why?  It was an easement for a carriage house that had belonged to a residence that sat on that block at one time.  When they were building the Barnett building, the easement could not be cleared, and it therefore could not be built upon.  It sits vacant waiting for a horse and carriage that will never arrive. :-)
Great story. But has that alley been filed in because the only space I can see in that block, using Google Street View is about 6 feet wide. Too narrow for a horse and buggy. The Sanborn maps from 1913 do show a very wide alley on Laura behind the Fla National Bank Bldg at Adams and Laura, but its a vacant lot now. Still a great story.
jb
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Re: Urban Neighborhoods: The Historic Downtown Core
« Reply #13 on: June 01, 2010, 09:31:20 PM »
Was any city/state/federal money used to convert the Churchwell Lofts or W.A. Knight building?

thelakelander

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Re: Urban Neighborhoods: The Historic Downtown Core
« Reply #14 on: June 01, 2010, 09:52:20 PM »
Churchwell has some type of lease agreement with the city for a nearby parking lot that was developed on city property.  Without it the project would not have been feasible.  The city put up two low-interest $300,000 loans to support the $1.7 million acquisition and restoration costs for the W.A. Knight building in 2001.
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