Author Topic: Where are they and what do they have in common?  (Read 2045 times)

Metro Jacksonville

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Where are they and what do they have in common?
« on: August 14, 2007, 11:15:00 AM »
Where are they and what do they have in common?



Where are these locations, and what do they have in common?

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jbm32206

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Re: Where are they and what do they have in common?
« Reply #1 on: August 14, 2007, 11:54:07 AM »
They would, indeed, be idea locations for rail tranist

thelakelander

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Re: Where are they and what do they have in common?
« Reply #2 on: August 14, 2007, 12:43:34 PM »
With vision, these areas could easily be recreated in a fashion similar to Portland's Pearl District.  Imagine, the economic results of such a thing in the Northside and it's affect on the downtown core.  This would be a great way to introduce quality affordable housing into inner city Jacksonville outside of the heart of downtown, yet still be physically connected to the central business district's activities.

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Portland's Pearl District



The Pearl District is a former warehouse and light industrial area just north of downtown Portland, Oregon now noted for its art galleries and upscale businesses and residences. Its boundaries are West Burnside Street on the south, NW Broadway on the east, the Burlington Northern Railroad tracks to the north, and the Interstate 405 Freeway on the west. The area has undergone significant development since the late 1990s and is now full of high-rise condominiums and warehouse-to-loft conversions.

In the late 1980s, an elevated highway ramp that ran along NW Lovejoy St. from the Lovejoy bridge past NW 10th Ave. was demolished, opening dozens of surrounding blocks (including some brownfield sites) for development, which peaked in the 2000s. The increasing density has attracted a mix of restaurants, brewpubs, shops, and art galleries, though in some cases pioneering tenants have been priced out of the area.

According to the Pearl District Business Association, Thomas Augustine, a local gallery owner, coined the name Pearl District more than 10 years ago to suggest that its industrial buildings were like crusty oysters, and that the galleries and artists' lofts within were like pearls. "There were very few visible changes in the area," says Al Solhiem, a developer who has been involved in many projects in the district. "People would drive by and not have a clue as to what was inside." As local business people were looking to label the growing area—the "warehouse district" or the "brewery district" were two suggestions—a writer for Alaska Airlines borrowed Augustine's phrase, according to Solheim. The name stuck.

The area is home to several Portland icons, including Powell's City of Books. The former Weinhard Brewery, which operated continuously from 1864 to September 1999, was shut down by Stroh's upon the purchase of the Weinhard's brand by Miller Brewing and sold for redevelopment as the Brewery Blocks. Art galleries, boutiques, and restaurants abound, and there are also a number of small clubs and bars. The United States Post Office main processing facility for all of Oregon and SW Washington was built in the Pearl in 1964, next to Union Station. This location was chosen in order for the post office to be able to better serve towns outside the Portland metro area.

For more information on the Pearl District: http://www.pearldistrict.org/

Streetcar Lofts (still searching for the bus rapid transit lofts)


New infill projects line the streetcar system running through the district


Older obsolete warehouse structures have been restored into new uses


Pearl District map (not the streetcar lines shown in the illustration)
"A man who views the world the same at 50 as he did at 20 has wasted 30 years of his life.” - Muhammad Ali

avonjax

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Re: Where are they and what do they have in common?
« Reply #3 on: August 14, 2007, 12:58:01 PM »
Converting the S line into a jogging path could very well prove to be a monumental mistake. Not only is it a waste to not use this line for rail transit but it could become a city developed crime district.
In it's current state I can't imagine anyone jogging along this path...
I sure hope I'm wrong.
And does anyone know the REAL reason JTA is so opposed to rail of any kind?

thelakelander

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Re: Where are they and what do they have in common?
« Reply #4 on: August 14, 2007, 03:08:18 PM »
I have no solid idea of why they have fallen hook, line and sinker with the BRT plan. 

A part of me feels this is a simple case of politics.  Although the original report suggested that light rail would be the superior mode, the BRT concept ended up being chosen because the board thought it was cheaper.  A part of this thinking may have evolved from pure ignorance of the many types of rail available out there and the Skyway Express disaster. 

Now years later, we've discovered that this simply isn't the case (in fact dedicated busway cost more), but JTA is now in a position where they may feel they need to move forward or they'll lose the funding they have lobbied to get so far for this white elephant.   It also hasn't helped that until recently, Jacksonville residents normally take it anyway that officials choose to dish it out, allowing the snowball to grow over the years instead of nipping it in the bud, just as soon as the concept of dedicated busways were mentioned.

"A man who views the world the same at 50 as he did at 20 has wasted 30 years of his life.” - Muhammad Ali

avonjax

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Re: Where are they and what do they have in common?
« Reply #5 on: August 14, 2007, 07:20:21 PM »
The citizens of Jacksonville need to be made aware that the BRT is possibly the most expensive mass transit alternative.
And they need to know that any tax money spent will most likely benefit mostly those who have no alternative but to use public transportation.
I'm not opposed to my tax money helping those in need, but it would be so much better if our money was spent to help everyone in Jacksonville, and I believe a decent rail system would cause a lot of people in the suburbs to park and ride.
All my friends in other cities with rail systems and who live in the suburbs always use the local rail to travel into their downtown areas or any destination where there is major traffic congestion.
But, they NEVER use the bus system.
I just don't think most of Jacksonville is aware of BRT plans.


thelakelander

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Re: Where are they and what do they have in common?
« Reply #6 on: August 14, 2007, 10:44:47 PM »
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And they need to know that any tax money spent will most likely benefit mostly those who have no alternative but to use public transportation.

Actually, the ones who will benefit the most will be those involved in the contracting, steel, concrete and the asphalt business.  There's a lot of money to be made in building a 29 mile expressway for buses.  All riders end up getting the short end of the stick, especially those dependent on transit. 

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All my friends in other cities with rail systems and who live in the suburbs always use the local rail to travel into their downtown areas or any destination where there is major traffic congestion.
But, they NEVER use the bus system.

This is universal.  Its also unfortunate that we have those in leadership who believe that JTA, of all entities, will figure out a way to defeat the universal "bus stigma" by allowing them to proceed with spending $750 million on BRT.

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I just don't think most of Jacksonville is aware of BRT plans.

Most aren't.  Most people are only interested in what happens in their backyard today, not something 30 years down the road (although those decisions are being made today).
"A man who views the world the same at 50 as he did at 20 has wasted 30 years of his life.” - Muhammad Ali