Author Topic: Elements of Urbanism: Kalamazoo  (Read 2847 times)

Metro Jacksonville

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Elements of Urbanism: Kalamazoo
« on: January 26, 2010, 06:02:05 AM »
Elements of Urbanism: Kalamazoo



Metro Jacksonville explores the downtown of Southwest Michigan's largest city and the home of the country's first urban pedestrian mall: Kalamazoo


Full Article
http://www.metrojacksonville.com/article/2010-jan-elements-of-urbanism-kalamazoo

Hurricane

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Re: Elements of Urbanism: Kalamazoo
« Reply #1 on: January 26, 2010, 06:20:52 AM »
I never knew that Kalamazoo had so many people.  I love that Radisson design, which you can see a glimpse of in almost every view of the city (or at least from these pictures).  Too bad the city is covered in snow for 8 months of the year...  :)

vicupstate

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Re: Elements of Urbanism: Kalamazoo
« Reply #2 on: January 26, 2010, 07:18:43 AM »
Nice city.  I think you have Huntsville in the overlay graphic.  That looks too big to be 25 sq. miles.
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thelakelander

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Re: Elements of Urbanism: Kalamazoo
« Reply #3 on: January 26, 2010, 07:44:00 AM »
Yeah, it was a miscommunication on our end.  The Kalamazoo article wasn't fully complete.  I used the Huntsville article as a place holder, while making my updates.  I'll update the aerial graphics on it tonight after work.
« Last Edit: January 26, 2010, 07:48:32 AM by thelakelander »
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thelakelander

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Re: Elements of Urbanism: Kalamazoo
« Reply #4 on: January 26, 2010, 10:10:52 AM »
Yes, we are building an online information database that no one can match.  If the cities from time to time are too small and you're not interested that particular place, just skip over the individual article.
"A man who views the world the same at 50 as he did at 20 has wasted 30 years of his life.” - Muhammad Ali

AaroniusLives

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Re: Elements of Urbanism: Kalamazoo
« Reply #5 on: January 26, 2010, 12:34:31 PM »
Quote
are you guys going to try to do one of these for every obscure spot in america... they're getting really boring.

As if Jacksonville is Paris on the St. Johns. (Not dissing Jville, but putting the snark into context.)

However, with regards to these articles, it might be helpful to include the following:
1. A "size" indicator, just so on first glance we can see how the metro area compares to Jax.
2. A bit of the "why." Perhaps this is too editorial for the site, and I don't think it should be too stringent (as I like to draw my own conclusions,) but it might be interesting to see a compare-and-contrast, a POV regarding the "why," and as it pertains to redevelopment, an explanation of the "how." For example, the "how" regarding Arlington's transformation into the present is just as remarkable as the "why" its model of TOD is relevant to Jax.

Kalamazoo reminds me a great deal of Harrisonburg, Virginia, although without the religious nuts (home of the Mnemonite Church.) They took a small city and made it livable. I will say this, Hburg gets the roads right, while Kzoo doesn't: way, WAY too wide to encourage pedestrian activity. I want to live whilst crossing the street!


vicupstate

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Re: Elements of Urbanism: Kalamazoo
« Reply #6 on: January 26, 2010, 01:32:32 PM »
The size of the city is really irrelevant.  The application of good urban design concepts is the reason it is highlighted.  Much of this site is devoted to Springfield, which has less than 10,000 residents.  Why wouldn't the main Street of a city of 10-20,000 be an appropriate model for Springfield?

   
"The problem with quotes on the internet is you can never be certain they're authentic." - Abraham Lincoln

thelakelander

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Re: Elements of Urbanism: Kalamazoo
« Reply #7 on: January 26, 2010, 01:55:43 PM »
Quote
are you guys going to try to do one of these for every obscure spot in america... they're getting really boring.

As if Jacksonville is Paris on the St. Johns. (Not dissing Jville, but putting the snark into context.)

However, with regards to these articles, it might be helpful to include the following:
1. A "size" indicator, just so on first glance we can see how the metro area compares to Jax.

Every article on other cities already includes this information for density, area, city, metro & urban area population and more.

Quote
2. A bit of the "why." Perhaps this is too editorial for the site, and I don't think it should be too stringent (as I like to draw my own conclusions,) but it might be interesting to see a compare-and-contrast, a POV regarding the "why," and as it pertains to redevelopment, an explanation of the "how." For example, the "how" regarding Arlington's transformation into the present is just as remarkable as the "why" its model of TOD is relevant to Jax.

We do this on a routine basis.  However, sometimes its best to remain silent and let readers draw their own conclusions.  We found over the years that the best dialogue comes from the readers themselves and their personal experience with various communities.

Quote
Kalamazoo reminds me a great deal of Harrisonburg, Virginia, although without the religious nuts (home of the Mnemonite Church.) They took a small city and made it livable. I will say this, Hburg gets the roads right, while Kzoo doesn't: way, WAY too wide to encourage pedestrian activity. I want to live whilst crossing the street!

Kalamazoo was a pleasent suprise when I visited a few years ago, given the size of the community.  So when I got the opportunity to do the drive from Detroit to Chicago a few months ago, I made sure to stop and walk around a little with the camera.
"A man who views the world the same at 50 as he did at 20 has wasted 30 years of his life.” - Muhammad Ali

thelakelander

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Re: Elements of Urbanism: Kalamazoo
« Reply #8 on: January 26, 2010, 01:57:04 PM »
The size of the city is really irrelevant.

I definitely agree with this!  When it comes to rightfully applying urban design principles, you can have success in any sized city.
"A man who views the world the same at 50 as he did at 20 has wasted 30 years of his life.” - Muhammad Ali

north miami

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Re: Elements of Urbanism: Kalamazoo
« Reply #9 on: January 26, 2010, 04:51:40 PM »
I never knew that Kalamazoo had so many people.  I love that Radisson design, which you can see a glimpse of in almost every view of the city (or at least from these pictures).  Too bad the city is covered in snow for 8 months of the year...  :)

My parents, natives of beautiful waterfront Charlevoix,Michigan,moved to south Florida in the 50's.My cousins always remained in Kalamazoo.They would make trips to the "Sunshine State" and my native North Miami ,but they remained stuck on Kalamazoo.I was always impressed (horrified) that my cousins seemingly lived many months underground in a basement.They are still there.

north miami

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Re: Elements of Urbanism: Kalamazoo
« Reply #10 on: January 26, 2010, 08:08:24 PM »
I never knew that Kalamazoo had so many people.  I love that Radisson design, which you can see a glimpse of in almost every view of the city (or at least from these pictures).  Too bad the city is covered in snow for 8 months of the year...  :)

My parents, natives of beautiful waterfront Charlevoix,Michigan,moved to south Florida in the 50's.My cousins always remained in Kalamazoo.They would make trips to the "Sunshine State" and my native North Miami ,but they remained stuck on Kalamazoo.I was always impressed (horrified) that my cousins seemingly lived many months underground in a basement.They are still there.

    P.S.   Pool covered with heavy plastic tarp.During my visits 'up there'- during the summer,everyone seemed to be making up for the perceived 'lack' or 'hardship'.Go figure.
Fact is- many,as in......many, would not assume blind migration to the First Coast,regardless of 'city' 'size'.

starrman69

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Re: Elements of Urbanism: Kalamazoo
« Reply #11 on: September 13, 2010, 07:55:42 AM »
Aahh, Kalamazoo!  I lived there for the 5 1/2 years I worked at WMU.  Always something to do and things to see.  With WMU and K-College there's usually a theatre event, concert or game to attend.  Amazing to see the changes that's gone on over the past 35 years.