Author Topic: The Impact of the Built Environment on Health  (Read 2938 times)

Metro Jacksonville

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The Impact of the Built Environment on Health
« on: January 15, 2010, 06:18:09 AM »
The Impact of the Built Environment on Health



Will power, genetics and meds affect our weight, fitness and health, but profoundly do the urban, suburban, park, school, nutritional, commercial, transportation and social environments we live in. The outdated 20th century American life‐style adds pounds, reduces vitality, and burns fuel rather than fat.

Full Article
http://www.metrojacksonville.com/article/2010-jan-the-impact-of-the-built-environment-on-health

Jason

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Re: The Impact of the Built Environment on Health
« Reply #1 on: January 15, 2010, 11:21:17 AM »
Wow.  That really makes you think.

Very well stated.

Captain Zissou

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Re: The Impact of the Built Environment on Health
« Reply #2 on: January 15, 2010, 01:20:15 PM »
A really great and well written article.  A great contribution to metrojax.

brainstormer

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Re: The Impact of the Built Environment on Health
« Reply #3 on: January 16, 2010, 11:48:51 AM »
How interesting that the Springfield gossip posts generate dozens of comments and sometimes pages, yet an article like this can't even get a handful.  It makes me wonder if all of the motivated individuals on this forum are losing spirit for changing this city.  Are our current city leaders really taking all of the fight out of us?  We have to find a way around them.  They are worthless in my opinion and incapable of change.

Jacksonville is a perfect example of what's wrong with current growth patterns in most large cities in the US.  We live in a warm climate, yet have high obesity rates.  Children continue to be diagnosed with diabetes at alarming rates.  Parents complain about how unsafe their neighborhoods are.  Downtown is desolate after 5pm.  We have enough apathy for the entire US in one city (I'm probably adding to it right now)....and the list goes on.  It is my generation that must wake up and demand change!  I'm not sure what the next 50 years hold but I think if we continue down the path we are on as a society we are going to implode mentally and probably die young.  I'm not sure what all of the answers are, but we can't be afraid of having the discussion.  Don't lose heart.  Let's get back to healthy discussion about what we must do to make this city a better place for all of us.  After all that's how I first found metrojacksonville.  We must broaden the conversation and scope of thought to include not just next month, but five, ten and 25 years from now.

stjr

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Re: The Impact of the Built Environment on Health
« Reply #4 on: January 16, 2010, 01:42:27 PM »
I think this article highlights a point:  The true costs of our current "planning" and "development" protocols are far more than the up front dollars initially invested.  At some point, to be truly "efficient", which includes providing us the highest quality of life for the least overall costs to society, we need to start assigning value to intangibles such as impacts on environment, health, safety, people's time, sustainability, our social and educational fabric, surrounding aesthetics, etc.  And, we need to stop distorting the economic process with unquantified or underreported subsidies for projects that lead to urban sprawl while underplaying the benefits of mass transit and good high-density urban design.

Perhaps, the study of feng shui should be required for urban planners, developers, and public officials who approve and enable their projects.  ;D  (See Wikipedia article for more at: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Feng_shui )
Hey!  Whatever happened to just plain ol' COMMON SENSE!!

buckethead

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Re: The Impact of the Built Environment on Health
« Reply #5 on: January 16, 2010, 02:53:04 PM »
Regarding Nocatee, it is a shame that the design is nothing more that a sprawling collection of subdivisions. A much smaller footprint coupled with a form of municiple transit, such as a trolley or two, could have produced a very enjoyable, convenient community. Driving to walk the dog? Driving to the amenities? Driving to the nature trails?

Did GM have a hand in designing this community?

Perhaps people desire driving for the sake of seclusion and quiet? If density was selling it seems we'd see more of it.

thelakelander

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Re: The Impact of the Built Environment on Health
« Reply #6 on: January 16, 2010, 09:16:10 PM »
Great article indeed.  It really makes you think.  Jacksonville, we have some work to do.
"A man who views the world the same at 50 as he did at 20 has wasted 30 years of his life.” - Muhammad Ali

Lunican

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Re: The Impact of the Built Environment on Health
« Reply #7 on: January 17, 2010, 02:32:52 PM »
This is an interesting article. He makes a good point that we seem to have won the battle against infectious diseases like tuberculosis and small pox, only to have replaced them with cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and depression.

Burning fuel instead of fat is another good quote.

CS Foltz

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Re: The Impact of the Built Environment on Health
« Reply #8 on: January 17, 2010, 03:42:25 PM »
Kids.....we have our work cut out for us! Just thinking where we could be 10 years from now gives me a chill!

brainstormer

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Re: The Impact of the Built Environment on Health
« Reply #9 on: January 18, 2010, 09:33:44 AM »
I think Jacksonville really needs to develop a two-fold approach.  We first need to create a development plan that encourages infill, high density, mixed use, and rehab investment.  Continuing to fill in swamp land at the outer edges is irresponsible.

The second thing to address would be asking ourselves, "How can we make current development better?  What investments can we make to give people neighborhoods that encourage live, work, play and healthier lives?"  

A perfect example of this is the Touchton, Southside, Gate Pkwy area.  Thousands of people live within a few square miles here and if one includes the SJTC there are dozens of restaurants and about all the retail one needs.  There are also large businesses located here including BCBS.  However, not a bike lane or hardly even a sidewalk to connect everything!  Wouldn't it be great to have a wide bike lane/walking path down each side of Southside?  There aren't even safe places or crosswalks crossing Southside!  On a daily basis I see runners, bikers, moms with strollers trying to cross Southside and then when they do they are running in the grass along side the road.  On Touchton you really have to bike/run in the road and Gate Parkway has a sidewalk here or there.  

How hard would it be to have a looping electric bus or trolley that connected these areas easily to one another?  Would BCBS employees take a trolley to get to the SJTC for lunch?  It worked in the downtown-Riverside experiment.  Would residents of Tapestry Park take it to get to a movie at Tinseltown?

To really think out of the box, let's put Southside from Touchton to Gate underground and create a green central park on top.  That would really connect the two sides!  The naysayers will always claim that there isn't money.  But if we stopped the planned widening of just one road in Jacksonville we would have money to get started.  This will all take an attitude adjustment, one I'm not sure this city is ready for.  We need to discuss ways we can make failures of the past into healthy communities of the future.
« Last Edit: January 18, 2010, 11:22:14 AM by brainstormer »

thelakelander

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Re: The Impact of the Built Environment on Health
« Reply #10 on: January 18, 2010, 10:18:30 AM »
All I can say at this point is that 2010 will be an interesting year.  A lot of the things you just mentioned will at least be put on the public table for discussion.  It will be up to the community to push for them when the time comes.
"A man who views the world the same at 50 as he did at 20 has wasted 30 years of his life.” - Muhammad Ali

fsu813

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Re: The Impact of the Built Environment on Health
« Reply #11 on: March 16, 2010, 06:27:25 PM »
This is a great piece. Worth reading again.
You know i'm just kiddin'.............unless you're gonna do it   -Kanye

Miss Fixit

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Re: The Impact of the Built Environment on Health
« Reply #12 on: March 16, 2010, 08:21:07 PM »
Walkability is where it's at!

danem

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Re: The Impact of the Built Environment on Health
« Reply #13 on: March 27, 2011, 10:32:43 PM »
Quote
To really think out of the box, let's put Southside from Touchton to Gate underground and create a green central park on top.  That would really connect the two sides!  The naysayers will always claim that there isn't money.  But if we stopped the planned widening of just one road in Jacksonville we would have money to get started.  This will all take an attitude adjustment, one I'm not sure this city is ready for.  We need to discuss ways we can make failures of the past into healthy communities of the future.

You truly are a brainstormer, brainstormer. That idea sounds awesome. I am curious if this has been done anywhere else before?

uptowngirl

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Re: The Impact of the Built Environment on Health
« Reply #14 on: March 27, 2011, 10:42:08 PM »
Fantastic article!!!! More Please!