Author Topic: Elements of Urbanism: Ann Arbor  (Read 3314 times)

Metro Jacksonville

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Elements of Urbanism: Ann Arbor
« on: September 15, 2009, 05:06:19 AM »
Elements of Urbanism: Ann Arbor



Integrated with the University of Michigan's main campus, Downtown Ann Arbor is known for being one of the Midwest's most vibrant urban centers.

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http://www.metrojacksonville.com/article/2009-sep-elements-of-urbanism-ann-arbor

jaxlore

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Re: Elements of Urbanism: Ann Arbor
« Reply #1 on: September 15, 2009, 11:52:45 AM »
We do have FCSJ or whatever they call it and if only they could plan there growth around there downtown campus and tie in with city growth, it would be a change for the better for our downtown. Maybe buy a downtown building and put in dorms!!!

Lunican

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Re: Elements of Urbanism: Ann Arbor
« Reply #2 on: September 15, 2009, 03:07:28 PM »

Ocklawaha

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Re: Elements of Urbanism: Ann Arbor
« Reply #3 on: September 16, 2009, 12:21:26 AM »
Don't know if you youngsters knew about this interesting railroad that offered shippers a shortcut across the Lake, avoiding Chicago. It was called, (what else) THE ANN ARBOR, parts of which are still running, but the car ferrys are gone.


Check out the photos on the Timetable cover.


Here is a view of the Ann Arbor


This is a "DMU" well, sort of. It is a McKeen Motor Car, quite a rare vehicle, a completely self contained train. The McKeens weird boat shaped front and port hole windows make it easy to spot in a crowd of similar motor cars - they were generally called "Doodlebugs".  The SCL (todays CSX) in Florida operated one of the last Doodlebugs in America, connecting with their passenger trains in Lakeland and pulling a coach and sleeper to Ft. Myers and Naples. Amtrak killed the connection, and SCL SCRAPPED THE ALMOST ONE OF A KIND ANTIQUE.

The McKeen cars go back so far that to start one, the engineer had to set all of the controls, then use a special little hammer to smack a spark into each cylinder, in perfect time and perfect firing sequence!


Yep, still possible to find that Ann Arbor Name.



This WAS the Florida version about 1970


OCKLAWAHA

« Last Edit: September 16, 2009, 12:25:31 AM by Ocklawaha »

DetroitInJAX

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Re: Elements of Urbanism: Ann Arbor
« Reply #4 on: September 18, 2009, 08:52:48 AM »
Used to visit A2 (as the locals call it), very regularly, as I grew up about 30 minutes from the Downtown area.  The city really is great.  Even during the winter, the shopping districts and restaurants are full.  Main street is a real treat, with all the unique bars and restaurants (most of which are NOT chain, imagine that)... You can pretty much get any kind of cuisine you feel like in Downtown Ann Arbor.  As for the stores, there's ALOT of used (as well as new) booksellers in this city.  Imagine quite a few "mini-chamblins" sprinkled throughout the town.  During the summer they shut down Main Street and hold the Ann Arbor Art Fair, which is absolutely huge.  Another great thing about this city?  Totally walkable.  Its core is very compact and flows freely into the UM campus (except North Campus).  Anywhere you cant get by walking you can get to by AATA bus (yes, this little city has its own bus system and its more reliable, cleaner, and safer than JTA)... Or, if youre a UM student, the University runs its own bus network and has a fleet of buses. 

All in all there's plenty of hole-in-the-wall bars, shops, boutiques, and fun things to do in this city... And you will see things you wont see anywhere else in Michigan, due to the liberal, "free-thinking" feel of the area.

JFman00

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Re: Elements of Urbanism: Ann Arbor
« Reply #5 on: June 19, 2013, 07:01:01 PM »
Near Ann Arbor for a couple days after being in New York and I'm more impressed by Ann Arbor. Buses in Washtenaw County seem to be all hybrid (starting in 2008) or biodiesel. The middle/lower-class suburb of Ypsilanti offers free WiFi in its downtown. The Whole Foods is gigantic. There's a Trader Joe's. It's just a summer half-session, guessing the vast majority of the student body is gone, but walking around downtown Ann Arbor you wouldn't know it. It's a much different vibe than other college towns I've visited, seriously making me reconsider my anti GO BLUE prejudice.

I wonder though, are there really any lessons unique to Ann Arbor that apply to Jacksonville? Seems like the chances to capitalize on urban campuses have passed by.

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CCMjax

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Re: Elements of Urbanism: Ann Arbor
« Reply #7 on: June 16, 2016, 01:18:56 PM »
We do have FCSJ or whatever they call it and if only they could plan there growth around there downtown campus and tie in with city growth, it would be a change for the better for our downtown. Maybe buy a downtown building and put in dorms!!!

I'm not sure if your message was sarcastic or not but comparing FSCJ to an institution like UM is not apples to apples.  It's not even comparing fruit.  UM is a large ultra progressive top tier public university in an ultra progressive town with more than 50,000 students and faculty living right in the core of a city that is much smaller than Jacksonville.  I don't mean to offend anyone but the capacity and ability to create and sustain healthy urban environments is much greater in a place like that.  FSCJ is not going to turn this city into an Ann Arbor, I'm sorry but it's just not.   Even though they are in fact building/renovating a dorm of sorts downtown as we speak on Adams Street.
"The first man who, having enclosed a piece of ground, bethought himself of saying 'This is mine,' and found people simple enough to believe him, was the real founder of civil society." - Jean Jacques Rousseau

CCMjax

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Re: Elements of Urbanism: Ann Arbor
« Reply #8 on: June 16, 2016, 01:23:17 PM »
Don't know if you youngsters knew about this interesting railroad that offered shippers a shortcut across the Lake, avoiding Chicago. It was called, (what else) THE ANN ARBOR, parts of which are still running, but the car ferrys are gone.



Actually, you can still take a car ferry across.  I believe they go from Muskegon, MI to Milwaukee, WI and Ludington, MI to Manitowoc, WI.
"The first man who, having enclosed a piece of ground, bethought himself of saying 'This is mine,' and found people simple enough to believe him, was the real founder of civil society." - Jean Jacques Rousseau